23 results in English
Upper View of the Castillo del Morro Situated at the Mouth of the Bay of Havana
This 18th-century manuscript map shows the plan of Morro Castle, located at the entrance of Havana Bay, Cuba. The fortress was built by the Spaniards, starting in 1585. The Italian military engineer Battista Antonelli (1547–1616) was commissioned to design the fortifications. The structure originally was conceived as a small fort surrounded by a dry moat, but it was expanded and rebuilt on several occasions and became a major fortress of great strategic importance for the island. The map is oriented with north to the left and tilted up at ...
Contributed by National Library of Spain
Map of the Bay of Rio de Janeiro
Jacques Bellin (1703-72) was a prolific cartographer attached to the French Marine Office. His sea atlases reflected the careful mapping of bays, seas, and harbors that characterized 18th-century French naval cartography. In 1764, he published Le Petit Atlas Maritime, a work in five volumes, containing 581 maps. This map, from the second volume of the atlas, shows the Bay of Rio de Janeiro and its important natural harbor.
Voyage Around the World by the King's Frigate La Boudeuse and the Ship L'Etoile in 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769
Following France’s defeat in the Seven Years' War (1756-63), Louis-Antoine de Bougainville (1729-1811), a soldier with a distinguished military record in Canada, received permission from King Louis XV to undertake France’s first major geographical exploration of the Pacific. In 1766-69 Bougainville became the first Frenchman to circumnavigate the globe. His voyage, meticulously recounted in this book, resulted in several significant scientific contributions, including establishing the precise location of a number of Pacific islands and determining the width of the Pacific Ocean. However, it was Bougainville’s observations of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Kingdoms of Siam, Tunquin, Pegu, Ava Aracan
Jacques Bellin (1703-72) was a prolific cartographer attached to the French Marine Office. His sea atlases reflected the careful mapping of bays, seas, and harbors that characterized 18th-century French naval cartography. In 1764, he published Le Petit Atlas Maritime (Small maritime atlas), a work in five volumes, containing 581 maps. This map, from the third volume of the atlas, shows the kingdoms of southeast Asia as they appeared in the mid-18th century, including Ava and Pegu (present-day Burma), Siam (Thailand), Cambodia, and Tonkin (part of present-day Vietnam). Also shown are ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Intercession (1764), Southwest View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This southwest view of the Church of the Intercession of the Mother of God on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two churches, one dedicated to the Transfiguration and the other to the Intercession ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Intercession (1764), Icon Screen, Kizhi Island, Russia
This interior view of the Church of the Intercession of the Mother of God on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing a bell tower and two wooden churches, one dedicated to the Transfiguration and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Intercession (1764), Icon Screen, Kizhi Island, Russia
This interior view of the Church of the Intercession of the Mother of God on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches, one dedicated to the Transfiguration (1714) and the other to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Catching Cicadas
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. This print is a page from an egoyomi (pictorial calendar), which ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Manuscript Edition of Romance of the West Chamber in Manchu and Chinese Languages
This is a manuscript edition of the popular play Xi xiang ji (Romance of the west chamber) by Wang Shifu (circa 1250–1307), a Yuan dynasty playwright about whom little is known. Fourteen plays are attributed to him, of which only three are extant. Perhaps the best known and most popular is this work, which was written in the poetic drama form called za ju that was popular during the Yuan dynasty. Based on a Tang dynasty novel entitled Yingying zhuan (Story of Yingying), the drama narrates a tragic love ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Manuscript Map of Dagua River Region, Colombia
This beautiful pen-and-ink and watercolor map shows the Dagua River and the town of Sombrerillo in what was then the Spanish Viceroyalty of New Grenada. The river empties into the Pacific Ocean near the present-day city of Buenaventura, Colombia. Sombrerillo was a “free town” populated by former slaves who had gained their freedom from the lowland mines and the highland haciendas of the region. The map is oriented with north at the bottom.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Provinces of Nicaragua and Costa Rica
Jacques Bellin (1703-72) was a prolific cartographer attached to the French Marine Office. In 1764, he published Le Petit Atlas Maritime (Small maritime atlas), a work in five volumes containing 581 maps. Nicaragua and Costa Rica, shown in this map from the second volume of the atlas, were at the time provinces of the Captaincy General of Guatemala, part of the Spanish Empire. The left side of the image shows the title page of Bellin’s atlas. Nicaragua and Costa Rica both declared independence from Spain in 1821.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chambers of Bishop Joseph Zolotoy (1764-69), East Facade, Vologda, Russia
This photograph of the chambers of Bishop Joseph Zolotoy in Vologda was taken in 1995 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Before the founding of St. Petersburg in 1703, Russia depended on a northern route through the White Sea for trade with western Europe. One of the main centers on this route was Vologda, whose importance is reflected in architectural monuments such as this distinctive structure. Located in Archbishop's Court adjacent ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Plan de Monaco
Jacques Bellin (1703-72) was a prolific cartographer attached to the French Marine Office. In 1764, he published Le Petit Atlas Maritime (Small maritime atlas), a work in five volumes containing 581 maps. This map is from volume four of the atlas. Oriented with north at the lower right, it shows the city and port of Monaco. The Principality of Monaco is one of the world’s smallest countries. The Italian city-state of Genoa gained control of the region around Monaco in the 1100s and built the first fort there in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The West-India Pilot, Containing Piloting Directions for Port Royal Harbour in Jamaica, in and out through the Kays ...
Captain Joseph Smith Speer was an English mariner who spent many years in Central America and the Caribbean. He created detailed maps and guides based on his personal experiences. In 1766, he published The West-India Pilot, containing 13 maps and detailed navigational instructions for passage between Caribbean ports. An expanded edition with 26 maps appeared in 1771. Speer’s instructions to mariners were practical and straightforward. They pointed out hazards to be avoided, such as rocks and shallow waters, and advised captains on how to sail and anchor along the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The First Maqtaa Bridge under Construction
This 1968 photograph shows construction of Al-Maqtaa Bridge in Abu Dhabi. The single-span steel bridge connects the city of Abu Dhabi to the mainland. Seen in the background is the 200-year old Maqtaa watchtower, part of the Al-Maqtaa Fort, which served as a watchtower and line of defense against invasion. The fort is built in a traditional style, using wood and soft, sand-colored stone. The photograph is from the Colonel Edward "Tug" Bearby Wilson Collection in the National Library, Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage, and was taken by ...
Mitate-e:Crossing at Sano
Suzuki Harunobu (circa 1725–70) was a master of ukiyo-e in Edo (present-day Tokyo) and the key figure in developing nishiki-e (Japanese multicolored woodblock prints), such as this one. It shows a young woman at dusk in heavy snow, trudging across a bridge. Her feet are bare except for black lacquered clogs, and she is holding one long sleeve of her kimono over her head to protect her from the driving snow. The picture is based on the waka (short poem) “Sano no watari” (Crossing at Sano) by Fujiwara Teika ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Storming the Encampment at Gadan-Ola
The “Battle Copper Prints” are a series of prints from copper engravings dating from the second half of the 18th century. They were commissioned by the Qianlong emperor of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), who ruled from 1735 to 1796. They depict his military campaigns in China’s inner provinces and along the country’s frontiers. The master illustrations for the engravings were large paintings done by European missionary artists employed at that time at the court in Beijing. These artists were Italian Jesuit Giuseppe Castiglione (1688–1766), French Jesuit ...
Pacifying and Receiving the Surrender of Yili
The “Battle Copper Prints” are a series of prints from copper engravings dating from the second half of the 18th century. They were commissioned by the Qianlong emperor of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), who ruled from 1735 to 1796. They depict his military campaigns in China’s inner provinces and along the country’s frontiers. The master illustrations for the engravings were large paintings done by European missionary artists employed at that time at the court in Beijing. These artists were Italian Jesuit Giuseppe Castiglione (1688–1766), French Jesuit ...
The Great Victory at Qurman
The “Battle Copper Prints” are a series of prints from copper engravings dating from the second half of the 18th century. They were commissioned by the Qianlong emperor of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), who ruled from 1735 to 1796. They depict his military campaigns in China’s inner provinces and along the country’s frontiers. The master illustrations for the engravings were large paintings done by European missionary artists employed at that time at the court in Beijing. These artists were Italian Jesuit Giuseppe Castiglione (1688–1766), French Jesuit ...
The Battle of Arcul
The “Battle Copper Prints” are a series of prints from copper engravings dating from the second half of the 18th century. They were commissioned by the Qianlong emperor of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), who ruled from 1735 to 1796. They depict his military campaigns in China’s inner provinces and along the country’s frontiers. The master illustrations for the engravings were large paintings done by European missionary artists employed at that time at the court in Beijing. These artists were Italian Jesuit Giuseppe Castiglione (1688–1766), French Jesuit ...
Map of the Region of the Iténez or Guaporé River and Its Tributaries
This pen-and-ink watercolor map shows the Iténez-Guaporé River Basin. The map shows the location of the fortress of Nossa Senhora da Conceição dos Portugueses and the deployment of Spanish troops under command of Alonso Berdugo and Aymerich Tete. This river, now known in Brazil as the Guaporé, forms the border between the Brazilian provinces of Rondônia and Mato Grosso, before flowing north into Bolivia, where it is known as the Iténez.
Map of the Situation of the Three Main Fortresses on the Inlet Entrance of Rio de Janeiro
This 1764 map shows three fortresses located off the coast of Rio de Janeiro in Guanabara Bay: Fortaleza de São João da Barra do Rio de Janeiro, Forte de Santa Cruz da Barra, and Forte de Laje. Located on a rocky outcropping at the entrance to the bay, Santa Cruz da Barra was built by the French in 1555. The Portuguese expelled the French from Guanabara Bay in 1567 and took over the fortress, which they used to control the entrance to the bay.
A Plan of the West Line or Parallel of Latitude
This map shows the original Mason-Dixon Line, traditionally thought of as the divide between North and South in the United States and, before the Civil War, between the slaveholding and non-slaveholding states. In the 1700s, a boundary dispute arose between the British colonies of Maryland and Pennsylvania. They agreed to resolve the dispute by having two English astronomers, Charles Mason (1728–86) and Jeremiah Dixon (1733–79), survey the border. Mason and Dixon completed their survey in 1767 and set up milestones to mark the line. This map was made ...
Contributed by Library of Congress