13 results in English
The Art of Making Mechanical Timepieces for Church Towers, Rooms, and Pockets
Manuel del Río was a Spanish Franciscan, said to have been a skilled watchmaker, who probably learned the trade in Oporto, Portugal, with Tomás Luis de Sáa. Del Río belonged to the Franciscan community in Santiago, where in 1759 he published Arte de los reloxes de ruedas (The art of making mechanical timepieces). The work was reissued in 1789 in Madrid by del Río’s disciple Ramón Durán. That edition is presented here. The prologue states that one of the reasons for writing the book was the lack of manuals ...
Contributed by National Library of Spain
Map in Which the Rivers on Argentina, Parana and Paraguay are Described Most Exactly for the First Time, When a Beginning was Made by the New Colony as Far as the Mouth of the Jauru River
This atlas of colonial South America is by Miguel Antonio Ciera. A noted mathematician and professor of astronomy at the University of Coimbra in Portugal, Ciera was part of an expedition sent to demarcate the border between Spanish and Portuguese holdings in South America following signature of the 1750 Treaty of Madrid and the 1756 Guarani War. The atlas focuses on the southern part of the continent, in the watershed of the Paraná River, where the borders were most disputed. The territory in the atlas includes present-day Argentina and Paraguay ...
The Western part of New France, or Canada, Done by Mr. Bellin, Royal Marine Engineer, in Order to Further Understanding of Present-Day Political Matters in America
This detailed map of the Great Lakes region of western “New France” by Jacques Nicolas Bellin was published by the Heirs of Homan in 1755, shortly before the outbreak of the Seven Years’ War, the conflict that resulted in the transfer of New France to British hands. Bellin was just one representative of a greater movement by French royal and military cartographers in the 18th century to map New France using the knowledge possessed by Native Americans. This map shows details not only of the Canadian waterways, but also of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of Quebec, Capital of Canada
This illustrated map, from the Rochambeau Collection of the Library of Congress, presents a striking panorama of the City of Quebec during its last years as the capital of New France, the French colony of Canada. Drawn in 1755 by Royal Geographer Georges-Louis Le Rouge, the map identifies ten key sites throughout the city. Located on the St. Lawrence River, Quebec was an administrative, military, and commercial hub, as well as a religious center that was home to a cathedral, bishop’s palace, seminary, and Jesuit mission. Originally established in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Little Treatise on the Medical Treatment of the Back and of Hemorrhoids
The present manuscript preserves a copy of a brief medical treatise by the erudite polymath Aḥmad ibn ʻAbd al-Munʻim al-Damanhūrī (1690–1778). The name of al-Damanhūrī more traditionally is connected with his activity as a professor at Al-Azhar University in Cairo and with his numerous treatises on politics, Islamic law, logic, and rhetoric. One of his works, a fatwa in which he criticized the building of new churches and the reopening of old ones in 18th-century Cairo, recently has been published in English translation. The treatise in this manuscript shows ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Arabic-Italian Dictionary
This mid-18th century volume, entitled Repertorio Arabo–Italiano in Italian, forms a kind of lexical vade mecum (a book for ready reference) for Arabic and Italian. Its principal components are an Arabic–Italian dictionary (Arabic on the right, Italian on the left) and a classified word list. The dictionary is the largest portion of the book, arranged according to the Arabic alphabet. The word list in the second part consists of 55 classified sections on various topics, including animals, clothing, precious stones, months and days, logical terms, and Christian themes ...
General Map of the Diocese of Pará: Shows the Division of Parishes Where the Venerable Father Miguel de Bulhões III, Bishop from Pará, Founded and Built the Diocese
This map shows the territory of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Belem do Pará. The diocese was founded in 1720, following its separation from the Diocese of São Luis do Maranhão, and was centered in the city of Belém, the capital of Pará state. The map shows the extent of the diocese under Bishop Miguel de Bulhões e Souza (1706-78), who served as a bishop in Singapore before coming to Brazil in 1749. Bulhões oversaw the construction and consecration of a new cathedral in Belém as well as the reopening ...
Collection of the Prospects of the Villages, Remarkable Places and People who are Depicted in the Map Drawn by the Engineers During Their Expedition that Began from the City of Pará to the Village of Mariua on the Negro River
This collection of maps shows villages along the Rio Negro and the Amazon. They are the product of an expedition undertaken by a group of engineers tracing the route of the Negro from Pará to Mariua. The drawings mostly feature local houses, churches, and other buildings along the banks of the river. The maps are attributed to the German engineer João André Schwebel, who was a partner of Mendonça Furtado on this expedition.
An Account of a Selection of Plants of America
The first world-renowned natural scientist to set foot on Colombian soil was the Dutch physician and botanist Baron Nikolaus Joseph Jacquin (1727–1817). As a young man he showed such ability in his studies in Vienna that he attracted royal patronage. Emperor Francis I commissioned him to travel to the Americas for the purpose of collecting rare and exotic plants for the imperial parks of Vienna and Schönbrunn Palace. This tour occupied him from 1755 to 1759. Jacquin was the first person to show the world the botanical treasures of ...
An Account of a Selection of Plants of America
The first world-renowned natural scientist to set foot on Colombian soil was the Dutch physician and botanist Baron Nikolaus Joseph Jacquin (1727–1817). As a young man he showed such ability in his studies in Vienna that he attracted royal patronage. Emperor Francis I commissioned him to travel to the Americas for the purpose of collecting rare and exotic plants for the imperial parks of Vienna and Schönbrunn Palace. This tour occupied him from 1755 to 1759. Jacquin was the first person to show the world the botanical treasures of ...
Plan of New Orleans the Capital of Louisiana; With the Disposition of Its Quarters and Canals as They Have Been Traced by Mr. de la Tour in the Year 1720
New Orleans was founded in 1718 by Jean Baptiste le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, governor of the French colony of Louisiana. Bienville named the town after Philippe, Duke of Orléans, regent for King Louis XV. This map, published in London in 1759 by Thomas Jefferys, displays the focus and symmetry of the town plan, which was designed by or under the direction of Bienville. The “Mr. de la Tour” in the title refers to one of the earliest detailed manuscript plans of the city and denotes Pierre Le Blond de ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Battle of the Monongahela
This manuscript pen-and-ink map shows the disposition of troops at the beginning of the Battle of Monongahela, which took place on July 9, 1755, in the second year of the French and Indian War. Determined to drive the French out of western Pennsylvania, the British had sent a force of 2,000 army regulars and colonial militia commanded by General Edward Braddock to capture Fort Duquesne, located at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers in what is now downtown Pittsburgh. After an arduous march through northern Virginia and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Country about the Mississippi, Circa 1755
A handwritten note on the back of this manuscript pen-and-ink map from around 1755 states: “Map of the country about the Mississippi. Drawn by Chegeree (the Indian) who says he has travelled through the country.” It is not known who Chegeree was, but he appears to have made the map for an anonymous British official early in the French and Indian War (1754–63). The map and accompanying notes portray the extent of French forces and troop strengths in the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys at the outset of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress