9 results in English
Church of St. Nicholas (1705), South Facade, Detail, Nyrob, Russia
This photograph of the south façade of the Church of St. Nicholas in Nyrob (northern part of Perm' Territory) was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated near the Kolva River some 160 kilometers north of Solikamsk, Nyrob is first mentioned in historical sources in 1579. Because of its remote location, the settlement was chosen by Tsar Boris Godunov in 1601 as the place of exile for the boyar ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Second Map of Sacred Geography Gathered from the Old and New Testaments: This Map Shows the Promised Land Divided into Its Tribes and Regions
This hand-colored map of the Holy Land is a reprint of a map that appeared in the 1662 edition of Nicolas Sanson’s Geographia sacra (Sacred geography), first published in 1653. Sanson (1600-67) is considered by many to be the founder of the French school of cartography. The map was published in Amsterdam in 1704 by François Halma (1653-1722), a Dutch bookseller and publisher who started a business in Utrecht, later moved to Amsterdam, and finally settled in Leeuwarden.
The Grand Theater of the War in Italy
Pierre Mortier (1661-1711) was a Dutch publisher of atlases, maps, and charts. The grandson of religious refugees from France who settled in Leiden about 1625, Mortier grew up in Amsterdam, which at the time was the center of the international book trade. As a young man, he spent several years in Paris, where he got to know French maps and publishers. Returning to Amsterdam about 1685, he established himself as a publisher of high quality maps, including reprints of works by Alexis-Hubert Jaillot, Nicolas Sanson, and the other great French ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Tobol'sk Kremlin, Merchants' Court (Gostinnyi Dvor), (1703-05), South View, Tobol'sk, Russia
This photograph of the Merchants' Court (Gostinnyi dvor) in Tobol’sk, was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Tobol'sk was founded in 1587 at the confluence of the Tobol and Irtysh rivers. Peter the Great attached much significance to the development of Tobol'sk as a base for Russian expansion in Siberia. In 1708, he designated Tobol’sk as the administrative center for the Province of Siberia, which ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Ascension-Trinity Monastery, Church of the Ascension (1704), Southeast View, Solikamsk, Russia
This southeast view of the Church of the Trinity (formerly Ascension) at the Ascension-Trinity Monastery in Solikamsk was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Founded around 1430 on the middle reaches of the Kama River, Solikamsk is among the oldest Russian settlements in the Ural Mountains. Its wealth was based on salt (hence the first part of its name) and other minerals. The Ascension Monastery was founded circa 1590 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Grammatical Investigations
This clearly written manuscript, dated 1857, is a work on grammatical questions by Gabriel Germanus, or Jirmānūs, Farḥāt (circa 1670–1732), metropolitan of Aleppo and founder of the Lebanese Maronite Order. Maronite synod documents of the 16th century reflect a poor standard of Arabic and are often interspersed with Syriac words. Metropolitan Farḥāt was a writer of correct and elegant Arabic and a forerunner of the Maronite initiative in the 19th century Arabic revival. The work was written in 1705 and then printed in 1836 at the American Protestant press ...
Valentia Edetanorum, Plebs of Cid
This important early map, on four sheets, of the city of Valencia is by Tomas Vicente Tosca (1651–1723), a local priest, scholar, mathematician, cartographer, and theologian, who was a founder of the Novatores group, a scientific society established with the aim of challenging and renewing prevailing ideas and practices. Father Tosca’s most important book was Compendio Matemático (Mathematical compendium), a nine-volume work composed in 1707–15 that covered, in addition to mathematics and geometry, such subjects as astronomy, geography, seamanship, military architecture, optics, and perspective. The success of ...
Contributed by National Library of Spain
The Art and Vocabulary of the Achagua Language
Arte y bocabulario de la lengua achagua: Doctrina christiana, confessionario de uno y otro sexo e instrucción de cathecumenos (The art and vocabulary of the Achagua language: Christian doctrine, the confession of both sexes, and instruction in the catechism) attests to the linguistic effort undertaken by the Jesuit missionaries in the borderlands of present-day Colombia and Venezuela. As its long title explains, this small manuscript volume, written in beautiful calligraphy and now preserved in the National Library of Colombia, contains several items: a grammar of the Achagua language, an extensive ...
Church of St. Nicholas (1705), Southwest View, Nyrob, Russia
This southeast view of the Church of St. Nicholas in the town of Nyrob (northern part of Perm' Territory) was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated near the Kolva River some160 kilometers north of Solikamsk, Nyrob is first mentioned in historical sources in 1579. Because of its remote location, the settlement was chosen in 1601 by Tsar Boris Godunov as the place of exile for the boyar Mikhail ...
Contributed by Library of Congress