15 results in English
The Fortunate Victory of Spain Against Forty Enemy Ships that Were on the Shore and Coast of the City of Valencia on April 4
Vitoria felicissima de Eʃpaña contra quarenta nauios de enemigos que andavan en la playa y Coʃta de la ciudad de Valencia a quatro de Abril (The fortunate victory of Spain against forty enemy ships that were on the shore and coast of the city of Valencia on April 4) was published in Lima, Peru, in 1618. The first printing press in South America was established in Lima by Antonio Ricardo (circa 1540−1606), an Italian who had worked for a time as a printer with the Jesuits in Mexico City ...
Contributed by National Library of Peru
Report of All that Has Happened in Rome, Naples, Venice, Genoa, Sicily, France, Germany, England, and Malta
Relacion de avisos de todo lo qve ha svcedido en Roma, Napoles, Venecia, Genova, Sicilia, Francia, Alemania, Inglaterra, y Malta (Report of all that has happened in Rome, Naples, Venice, Genoa, Sicily, France, Germany, England, and Malta) was published in Lima, Peru, in 1618. The first printing press in South America was established in Lima by Antonio Ricardo (circa 1540−1606), an Italian who had worked for a time as a printer with the Jesuits in Mexico City. This book is part of a collection of 39 first editions in ...
Contributed by National Library of Peru
The Art of the Quechua Language
Arte de la lengva qvichva (The art of the Quechua language) was published in Lima, Peru, in 1619. The book is by Diego de Torres Rubio (1547−1638), a Spanish-born Jesuit priest who came to Peru in 1579, where he devoted himself to the study of Indian languages, especially Aymara and Quechua. The first printing press in South America was established in Lima by Antonio Ricardo (circa 1540−1606), an Italian who had worked for a time as a printer with the Jesuits in Mexico City. This book is part ...
Contributed by National Library of Peru
Truthful Report of a Letter Sent by Father Prior of the Order of Santo Domingo of the City of Ubeda to the Abbot of San Salvador of Granada
Relacion verdadera de vna carta qve embio el padre prior dela orden de ʃanto Domingo, de la ciudad de Vbeda, al Abad mayor de ʃan Saluador dela Ciudad de Granada (Truthful report of a letter sent by Father Prior of the order of Santo Domingo of the city of Ubeda to the abbot of San Salvador of Granada) was published in Lima, Peru, in 1617. The first printing press in South America was established in Lima by Antonio Ricardo (circa 1540−1606), an Italian who had worked for a time ...
Contributed by National Library of Peru
Decree of Our Most Holy Father Pope Paul V in Favor of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God
Decreto de Nvestro Sanctissimo Padre el Papa Pavlo V. en favor dela Immacvlada Concepción dela Sanctiʃsima Virgen Madre de Dios y Señora Nueʃtra (Decree of our most holy father Pope Paul V in favor of the Immaculate Conception of the blessed Virgin Mary, mother of God) was published in Lima, Peru, in 1618. This one-page decree concerns the Immaculate Conception, the doctrine promulgated by the Roman Catholic Church, which holds that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was born without sin. The first printing press in South America was established in ...
Contributed by National Library of Peru
Decree of Francisco de Borja, Prince of Esquilache, Viceroy of Peru, 1617
Don Francisco de Boria Principe de Esqvilache Conde de Mayalde Gentilhombre dela Camara del Rey Nueʃtro ʃeñor ʃu Vírrey lugar teníente, Gouernador, y Capitan General (Francisco de Borja, prince of Esquilache, count of Mayalde, gentleman of the Our Lord’s royal chamber, his lieutenant viceroy, governor, and captain general) was published in Lima, Peru, in 1617. It is a one-page decree by Francisco de Borja y Aragón, prince of Esquilache (1582−1658), a Spanish nobleman and official who was viceroy of Peru in 1615−21. The first printing press in ...
Contributed by National Library of Peru
Constitutions of the Province of the Twelve Apostles of Peru, 1617
Constitvciones dela provincia delos Doze Apostoles del Pirv (Constitutions of the province of the Twelve Apostles of Peru) was published in Lima, Peru, in 1617. The first printing press in South America was established in Lima by Antonio Ricardo (circa 1540−1606), an Italian who had worked for a time as a printer with the Jesuits in Mexico City. This book is part of a collection of 39 first editions in the National Library of Peru, produced at the press between 1584 and 1619. The collection was inscribed on the ...
Contributed by National Library of Peru
Labyrinth of Terrestrial and Naval Commerce, in Which the Types of Merchandise and Forms of Contracting on the Land and Sea are Briefly and Concisely Treated, in a Useful and Productive Manner for Merchants
Labyrintho de comercio terrestre y naval (Labyrinth of terrestrial and naval commerce) was published in Lima, Peru, in 1617. Written by Juan de Hevia Bolaños (1570−circa 1623), a legal scholar who was born in Spain but lived much of his life in Lima, the book is compendium of the laws and customs regulating commerce in different countries of the world. Intended for practical use by mariners and merchants, it was the first such book published in the Western hemisphere. The first printing press in South America was established in ...
Contributed by National Library of Peru
Danzig, Nowadays a Very Crowded Market Town for the North, the West, and the Whole World
This panoramic view of Danzig (present-day Gdańsk) in 1617 is from the collection of cityscapes and broadsheets that once belonged to the Swedish statesman Count Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie (1622−86). ‏In the upper-left corner appear the coat of arms of Poland; in the upper-right hand corner, the coat of arms of Danzig. Below is a separately printed key in both Latin and German. At the bottom of the engraving is a description of the city, addressed to the reader, printed in 13 columns, in Latin and in German ...
The Very Large Portuguese City of Lisbon, a Most Famous Market Town for the Whole East and West India
This panoramic view of Lisbon in 1619 is from the collection of cityscapes and broadsheets that once belonged to the Swedish statesman Count Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie (1622-86). ‏The coat of arms of Portugal is in the upper-left corner; the coat of arms of Lisbon on the right. At the bottom of the engraving is a description of the city, printed in 16 columns, in French and in Latin. The Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie collection consists of 187 engravings from the late 1500s and early 1600s. The prints ...
Representation of Hispalis, Generally Known as Seville, World-Famous City and Renowned in Spain
This panoramic view of Seville in 1619 is from the collection of cityscapes and broadsheets that once belonged to the Swedish statesman Count Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie (1622−86). ‏At the bottom of the engraving is a description of the city, printed in 16 columns, in French. The print shows Seville from the right bank of the Guadalquivir River, with the Triana Bridge on the left, and the Spanish fleet below the Golden Tower on the right. The Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie Collection consists of 187 engravings from ...
Log Church of the Epiphany (also known as Nativity of the Virgin), (1617), Northwest View, with Kama River in Background, Pianteg, Russia
This photograph of the southeast view of the log Church of the Epiphany (also known as the Church of the Nativity of the Mother of God) in the village of Pianteg (Perm' Region) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated on the steep left bank of the Kama River some 40 kilometers southwest of Cherdyn', the Pianteg church is the oldest surviving log structure in the western Urals ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Works of Galileo Galilei, Part 3, Volume 12, Astronomy: Discourse on the Comets Produced by him at the Florentine Academy During his Very Consulship
Three comets appeared in the skies over Europe in 1618, a phenomenal series of events that ignited a debate about the nature of these celestial bodies and the implications of their appearance for the Aristotelian theory that celestial bodies were unchanging and “incorruptible.” In 1619, the Jesuit astronomer and mathematician Orazio Grassi published under a pseudonym his treatise on the comets, in which he upheld the established view of celestial bodies as unchangeable and orbiting the Earth. Already under attack for his defense of the theories of Copernicus, Galileo Galilei ...
Depictions of Metals, Minerals, Insects and Plants
Jin shi kun chong cao mu zhuang (Depictions of metals, minerals, insects, and plants) was painted by Wen Shu (1594–1634), a great-great-granddaughter of Wen Zhengming (1470–1559), one of the greatest Ming dynasty painters, calligraphers, and scholars. Married to Zhang Jun, also a painter, and residing in Hanshan, Wen Shu was surrounded by nature and excelled in painting birds, flowers, plants, insects, and butterflies. She spent a number of years copying thousands of illustrations from books of traditional Chinese medicine in the imperial collection. Zhang Jun’s handwritten preface ...
Contributed by National Central Library
Map of the Kingdom of Aragon by Juan Bautista Labaña
This map is the oldest known image of Aragon, the first Spanish map produced according to scientific procedures, and the most important map for 17th- and 18th-century Spanish cartography. It became the basis for all subsequent maps of the region, and is the only one that was made using direct measurement and surveys. The map was created by order of the Deputation of the Kingdom of Aragon by cartographer Juan Bautista Labaña (1555–1624), who employed the triangulation method. In 1610–15, Labaña travelled around the country making the necessary ...
Contributed by National Library of Spain