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The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
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National Library of Uganda
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Montevideo Celebrates Carnival Dancing Candombe
This photograph from the carnival celebrations in Montevideo, Uruguay, shows women dressed in costume, part of a carnival band dancing Candombe. Candombe is a drum-based Afro-Uruguayan rhythm that has roots in the Bantu regions of eastern and equatorial Africa, the original home of many slaves brought to Uruguay in the 18th century. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Montevideo Celebrates Carnival
This photograph of storybook figures on a rooftop depicts part of the carnival celebrations in Montevideo, Uruguay. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the pursuit ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
White Springs School 5th Graders Dancing
This photograph of children dancing is from the 1959 Florida Folk Festival. The festival first took place in 1953, on the grounds of the Stephen Foster Memorial along the banks of the Suwanee River in White Springs. The Suwannee formed the boundary between the Timucuans and the Apalachees, and the area was also considered special by the Seminole and Miccosukee peoples. The springs were considered by several indigenous American peoples to have healing powers. Settlers who began arriving in the area in the 1830s also advocated taking the waters, and ...
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State Library and Archives of Florida
Traditional Seminole Song - Rev. Josie Billie
Josie Billie was a member of the Florida Seminole people who lived his entire life on the Big Cypress Indian Reservation in Hendry County, Florida. Born December 12, 1887, Josie Billie was the son of Connie Pajo, also known to Floridians as Billie Cornpatch, the first Indian to receive a Western education in Florida. A Seminole medicine man and long-time public spokesman for the Florida Seminoles, Billie later continued his medical work as an herbalist and became a Baptist minister. He was a frequent participant in the Florida Folk Festival ...
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State Library and Archives of Florida
Report of the Constitutional Committee 1959
This four-part report was prepared in 1959 by a constitutional committee established by Sir Frederick Crawford, Governor of Uganda, as the then-protectorate of Uganda prepared for independence from Great Britain. The committee was chaired by John Wild, and included two other Europeans, two Asians, and ten Africans. It was “to consider, and to recommend to the Governor, the form of direct elections on a common roll for the representative members of the Legislative Council to be introduced in 1961, the number of seats to be filled under the above system ...
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National Library of Uganda