18 results in English
Biographic Sketch of Mohammad Ali, Pacha of Egypt, Syria, and Arabia
Biographic Sketch of Mohammad Ali (1769–1849), composed by an unknown author, was published in Washington in 1837. Muḥammad ʻAlī was pasha and wali (governor) of Egypt within the Ottoman Empire from 1805 until his death. The book begins by comparing him to Napoleon, noting that they shared the same birth year and the same “insatiate ambition.” The author describes Muḥammad ʻAlī’s military service under the Ottoman governor of Kavalla in Rumelia (northeastern Greece). Muḥammad ʻAlī also became a tobacco dealer during this period, an experience that probably inspired ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Front View of the Church of Saint-Eustache, Occupied by the Insurgents
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Back View of the Church of Saint-Eustache and Dispersion of the Insurgents
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
A Fortified Pass. Colonel Wetherall Advancing to the Capture of Saint-Charles
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Passage of the Richelieu River by Night
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Colonel Wetherall's Bivouac Shelter at Saint-Hilaire de Rouville
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Album of a Journey through Southern Russia and the Crimea, by Way of Hungary, Wallachia, and Moldova
This four-volume work documents the expedition undertaken in 1837 by the Russian industrialist and philanthropist Anatolii Demidov (1812-70) through southeastern Europe and the southern parts of the Russian Empire. Demidov was accompanied by a team of French scientists, engineers, and artists. The expedition gathered a wealth of information about the geography, history, archaeology, and peoples and cultures of a region still largely unknown to the rest of the world. Denis Auguste Marie Raffet (1804-60), the staff artist of the expedition, produced 64 lithographed plates for the volumes, along with many ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Landing Place and Cathedral, Belgrade, Servia
This photochrome print of Belgrade as seen from the neighborhood of Kalemegdan is part of “Views of Belgrade, Serbia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. At the top of the hill is the Saborna Crkva (Cathedral church), the great Serbian Orthodox cathedral dedicated to St. Michael, built by Prince Miloš Obrenović in 1837-40. The waterway is the Sava River, which flows into the Danube River. The “landing space,” or the port of Sava, played a role in Belgrade's history since the Roman occupation in the 3rd century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Seventy-two Specimens of Castes in India: "All people, nations and languages shall serve Him." ... Presented to the Reverend William Twining as a Token of Obligation by His...Friend Daniel Poor...
This illustrated manuscript made in southern India in 1837 consists of 72 full-color hand-painted images of men and women of the various castes and religious and ethnic groups found in Madura, India, at that time. As indicated on the presentation page, the album was compiled by the Indian writing master at an English school established by American missionaries in Madura, and given to the Reverend William Twining. The manuscript shows the Madura region's Indian dress and jewelry adornment, as they appeared before the onset of Western influences on South ...
Contributed by Yale University Library
Entrance to Port, Ostend, Belgium
This photochrome print of the port in Ostend is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located in West Flanders on the coast of the North Sea, Ostend is one of Belgium’s main port cities. Baedeker’s Belgium and Holland including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (1905) called Ostend “the second seaport and the most fashionable sea-bathing resort of Belgium.” Visible to the right is the Western Pier, which was built in 1837 to accommodate the city’s ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Topographical Map of Wisconsin Territory
This is the first large-scale map of the Wisconsin Territory based on actual surveys. The map was compiled and published by the surveyors Samuel Morrison, Elisha Dwelle, and Joshua Hathaway and engraved on three copperplates. In 1785, the United States Congress passed the Land Survey Ordinance, which provided for a system of square townships six miles on a side, divided into 36 one-square-mile sections. The map shows townships in the Wisconsin Territory surveyed by 1837. Also depicted are roads, trails, natural land forms, vegetation, mill sites, and the lead and ...
The Taking of Constantine, Algeria, 1837
This unsigned 1837 watercolor depicts French and native forces advancing across cliffs and through a breach in the wall of the fortified city of Constantine in Algeria. France was attempting to secure control of Algeria but was opposed by local tribes under Abd el Kader (circa 1807–83), the emir of Mascara. In October 1837 the French besieged and conquered the city, a victory that enabled them to secure a number of ports, but that still left them with no control over the interior of the country. Little is known ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
In Memoriam. An Address, on the Occasion of the Service in Memory of Queen Victoria, February 2, 1901
“In Memoriam” is an address delivered by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914), bishop of Uganda, in the Cathedral Church of Saint Paul, Mengo, Uganda, on February 2, 1901, on the occasion of the service in memory of Queen Victoria, who had died on January 22. Tucker thanked God for Victoria’s “life and noble example,” her “wise and sympathetic rule,” and “that high and holy courage with which she bore the burdens of state.” Victoria’s reign, he concluded, “will stand out as the brightest and most glorious page in ...
Northeast View of the Old Court House in Market Street, Philadelphia
This lithographic print shows the Old Court House in Market Street, Philadelphia, built in 1707−10 by carpenter Samuel Powell after the justices complained of having to hold court in an ale-house. The lower level was originally a watch-house, and the courtroom was on the second story. Official proclamations were read from the balcony, which was also where newly appointed governors of Pennsylvania made their inaugural addresses and elections for the county and city of Philadelphia were held before the State House was built. A cupola on the roof held ...
Southwest View of the Old Court House in Market Street, Philadelphia at the Time of its Being Taken Down (7th April 1837)
This lithographic print shows the Old Court House in Market Street, Philadelphia, constructed in 1707−10 after the justices complained of having to hold court in an ale-house. In its first four decades, the building fulfilled a number of municipal functions, including those of watch-house, courtroom, and site of official proclamations, inaugural addresses by newly elected governors of Pennsylvania, and elections for the county and city of Philadelphia. A cupola on the roof held the town bell. The print is by William L. Breton (circa 1773−1855), a British-born watercolorist ...
Charles Egner Wine and Liquor Store, 10 North Third Street, Philadelphia
This lithographed advertisement shows the busy four-story storefront for Charles Egner Wine & Liquor Store. Two gentleman converse near a row of stacked barrels within the store and two workers hoist a barrel at the second entranceway. In front of the open cellar to the building, an employee rolls one of several barrels lined on the sidewalk. To the left of the worker, three barrels stand upright and a gentleman approaches. The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia about 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced the first commercial lithographs in Philadelphia. This advertisement was printed in about 1837 by the partnership of Lehman & Duval.
Portico Square
This print is a view of the brick row houses, also known as Portico Row, built in 1833–35 at 900–930 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, also known as Portico Square, after the designs of Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walter (1804−87). Tenants of the row over the years included the Philadelphia High School for Young Ladies (1836–41), Commodore Isaac Hull (1842–43), and author Sarah Josepha Hale (1859–61). The print, which was published as the frontispiece to Philadelphia High School for Young Ladies (Philadelphia, 1837), also shows surrounding ...
Selected Poetry of Zafar
Muntakhib Kulliyat-I Zafar is a collection of poetry by the last Mughal emperor and last ruler of the Timurid Dynasty, Muhammad Bahadur Shah II (1775–1862), generally known as Bahadar Shah Zafar. The son of Akbar Shah II, the ruler of a declining empire, Zafar was a prolific writer and a great Urdu poet. He was influenced by Sauda, Meer, and Insha, eminent Urdu poets of the 18th–early 19th centuries. Zafar was also a noted patron of contemporary poets, including Ghalib, Dagh, Shah Naseer, Momin, and Zauq. He came ...