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Memoirs and Travels of Mauritius Augustus Count de Benyowsky: Consisting of His Military Operations in Poland, His Exile into Kamchatka, His Escape and Voyage from that Peninsula through the Northern Pacific Ocean, Touching at Japan and Formosa, to Canton in China, with an Account of the French Settlement He Was Appointed to Form upon the Island of Madagascar
Maurice Benyowsky (1741 or 1746-1786) was born near Trnava in present-day Slovakia, at the time part of Hungary and the Austrian Empire. After service in the Austrian Army, he joined a Polish nationalist movement fighting for freedom against Russia. He was arrested and exiled to Kamchatka in the Russian Far East. He escaped captivity and undertook an expedition to explore Kamchatka and the North Pacific. In 1772, he made his way to France, where he secured permission from King Louis XV to establish trading posts on Madagascar. In Paris, he ...
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Church of the Trinity in Green Fisher's Quarter (1768-72 and 1780-88), Southeast View, Tot'ma, Russia
This southeast view of the Church of the Trinity at Zelenskaia Fishermen’s Quarter in Tot'ma (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Sukhona River, Tot’ma for centuries was part of an important trading network that led from the Russian heartland northward to the White Sea. This network, and its links to Saint Petersburg and Moscow, sustained the prosperity of local merchants ...
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Church of the Trinity in Green Fisher's Quarter (1768-72 and 1780-88), Southwest View, Tot'ma, Russia
This southwest view of the Church of the Trinity at Zelenskaia Fishermen’s Quarter in Tot'ma (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Sukhona River, Tot’ma for centuries was part of an important trading network that led from the Russian heartland northward to the White Sea. This network sustained the prosperity of local merchants who made donations for church construction. An example ...
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Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Icon of the Sign (1768-1801), Early 20th Century, South View, Tiumen', Russia
This photograph of the south façade of the Cathedral of the Icon of the Sign (Znamenie) in the western Siberian city of Tiumen' was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Founded in 1586 on the site of a Tatar settlement at the confluence of the Tiumenka and Tura rivers, Tiumen' is considered the oldest permanent Russian settlement in Siberia. Until the 19th century, it existed in the shadow of ...
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The First Maqtaa Bridge under Construction
This 1968 photograph shows construction of Al-Maqtaa Bridge in Abu Dhabi. The single-span steel bridge connects the city of Abu Dhabi to the mainland. Seen in the background is the 200-year old Maqtaa watchtower, part of the Al-Maqtaa Fort, which served as a watchtower and line of defense against invasion. The fort is built in a traditional style, using wood and soft, sand-colored stone. The photograph is from the Colonel Edward "Tug" Bearby Wilson Collection in the National Library, Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage, and was taken by ...
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Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage
Bukovina
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Bukovina is Number 5 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Bukovina, a region in southeastern Europe that is today partly in Ukraine and partly in Romania, was, at the time ...
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Library of Congress
A Plan of the West Line or Parallel of Latitude
This map shows the original Mason-Dixon Line, traditionally thought of as the divide between North and South in the United States and, before the Civil War, between the slaveholding and non-slaveholding states. In the 1700s, a boundary dispute arose between the British colonies of Maryland and Pennsylvania. They agreed to resolve the dispute by having two English astronomers, Charles Mason (1728–86) and Jeremiah Dixon (1733–79), survey the border. Mason and Dixon completed their survey in 1767 and set up milestones to mark the line. This map was made ...
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Library of Congress