162 results in English
Map of New Netherland, Virginia, and New England
Joan Vinckeboons (1617–70) was a Dutch cartographer and engraver born into a family of artists of Flemish origin. He was employed by the Dutch West India Company and for more than 30 years produced maps for use by Dutch mercantile and military shipping. He was a business partner of Joan Blaeu, one of the most important map and atlas publishers of the day. Vinckeboons drew a series of 200 manuscript maps that were used in the production of atlases, including Blaeu’s Atlas Maior. This pen-and-ink and watercolor map ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Route of the Alaska Excursion Steamers
In the years after the Alaska Purchase in 1867, Americans had only a dim appreciation of the value and splendors of their new northern territory. This attitude changed slowly, and it was not fully overcome until the Klondike Gold Rush of 1898 radically altered perceptions of the region’s value. Even earlier, however, certain developments started to shift American views of Alaska. In particular, John Muir’s accounts of his travels to Alaska, beginning in the 1870s, gave Americans an initial feeling for the rare majesty of the Alaskan wilderness ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of Alaska, Yukon Territory, and British Columbia, Showing Connections of the White Pass and Yukon Route
Published in 1904, this map shows the routes and interconnecting service of the White Pass and Yukon Railroad between Skagway, Whitehorse, and Dawson City. It includes both train and boat routes, as well as geographical information on the adjacent areas of Alaska, Yukon, and British Columbia. The reverse side of the map contains a timetable as well as vignettes about points of interest throughout the region. The map was made to be folded as a brochure. The map shows the full course of the Yukon River, the longest river in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Salmon Canneries of the Pacific Northwest
In the late 19th century, salmon canneries became a major industry along the Pacific coastline of the United States and Canada. American fishing interests in the Pacific Northwest pressed for the Alaska Purchase in 1867 and strongly shaped regional politics up until the turn of the 20th century. Imperial Russia had imposed limits on Americans fishing in Alaskan waters. After Russia sold Alaska to the United States in 1867, Americans gained access to new fishing grounds, including some of the world’s best salmon runs. The combination of access to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Good-Natured Map of Alaska Showing the Services Offered by the "The Alaska Line"
This map, published in 1934 for the tourist market with colorful images and motifs, shows various shipping routes of the Alaska Line, which had a near-monopoly at that time on maritime transportation in the region. It also shows key interconnecting routes such as the Alaska Railroad, White Pass and Yukon Railroad, and Richardson Highway. The Alaska Steamship Company, known informally as the Alaska Line, was formed in 1894 by a group of frontier businessmen. Initially intended to service the fishing industry and passenger traffic, by 1898 and the onset the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map Showing Routes of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company
This foldable tourist brochure, published by Rand McNally and Company in 1891, shows the main routes and schedules of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. One side of the large sheet is a map showing the company’s routes from San Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, and other ports. An inset map on the right shows the routes from Seattle and Victoria, British Columbia, through the Inside Passage to Juneau, Sitka, and Glacier Bay in Alaska. A table in the upper right gives distances in nautical miles from San Francisco ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Western Motor Car Route Guide
This automobile guide shows the main highway route between Vancouver, Canada, and San Diego, California, circa 1915. The map lists the distance in miles from Vancouver to cities along the way, and highlights in red lettering the major intermediate stops, such as Seattle, Portland, San Francisco (Oakland), Bakersfield, and Los Angeles. Major civic expositions occurring in San Francisco and San Diego in 1915, which stimulated significant motor travel that year, are noted in red as well. Parts of the route include the Pacific Highway as well as follow segments of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Front View of the Church of Saint-Eustache, Occupied by the Insurgents
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Back View of the Church of Saint-Eustache and Dispersion of the Insurgents
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
A Fortified Pass. Colonel Wetherall Advancing to the Capture of Saint-Charles
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Passage of the Richelieu River by Night
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Colonel Wetherall's Bivouac Shelter at Saint-Hilaire de Rouville
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Holographic Will and Codicil of Jeanne Mance, Co-Founder of Montreal
Jeanne Mance (1606−73) was the first lay nurse to practice in Montreal, founder and first bursar of the Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal, and an iconic figure in the history of Montreal. She first arrived in Canada in 1641, inspired by her religious conviction to serve the settlers and the indigenous people by establishing a hospital. She oversaw construction of the Hôtel-Dieu, and made several journeys back to France to secure resources for the project. She deserves to be recognized as the founder of the city, along with the French military ...
Montreal Winter Carnival, February, 1884
In the late 19th century, the Montreal Winter Carnival changed the way winter was perceived in Quebec. It sought to attract visitors to the city in the heart of the winter, a season they had otherwise avoided. From 1883 to 1889, five such carnivals were organized. A smallpox epidemic caused a break in 1886 and the withdrawal of financing by the train companies caused a cancellation in 1888. Highly publicized, the carnival was attended by a large number of American tourists. Special trains were even chartered for the event. Discount ...
French Opera Theater, 1895−96 Season
Founded in Montreal in 1893, the professional troupe of the Théâtre de l'Opéra Français (French Opera Theater) moved to the Théâtre Français (French Theater), a renovated and electrified auditorium, one year later. The new venue was located at the corner of Sainte-Catherine Street and Saint-Dominique Street. In a context in which Quebec still had very few local professional artists and where theatrical and musical repertoire was primarily Anglophone, comedies, dramas, and operettas of the Théâtre de l'Opéra Français delighted the French-speaking Montrealers. Consisting of singers and actors from ...
Dominion Agricultural and Industrial Exhibition under the Patronage of His Excellency, the Governor General of Canada Will Take Place in the City of Montreal
This impressive poster of the Grande Exposition agricole et industrielle de la Puissance (Dominion Agricultural and Industrial Exhibition), held in Montreal in 1884, is more than two meters high. Dominated by the picture of the Montreal Crystal Palace, this monumental wood engraving was typical of the "mammoth posters" that were used in both Canada and the United States. The poster evokes the exceptional scale of the 1884 exhibition, which attracted a large number of visitors. These exhibitions took place during one week in August or September of each year. The ...
Women of the Empire in War Time: In Honour of their Great Devotion and Self-Sacrifice
This book was published in London in 1916 by the Dominion of Canada News Company to celebrate the contributions and sacrifice of the women of the British Empire in support of the Allies during World War I. Among the individuals extolled is Edith Cavell, a British nurse working in Brussels, who saved both German and Belgian lives and who was executed in 1915 by German authorities for helping Allied soldiers escape to the Netherlands, a neutral country. Different articles express admiration for the women of the Canadian Red Cross Society ...
Contributed by The British Library
Map of the Island of Newfoundland, 1689
This nautical map of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence was drawn in 1689 by the Basque cartographer Pierre Detcheverry at Plaisance (present-day Placentia, Newfoundland, Canada), the French capital of Newfoundland, for Governor Antoine Parat. It contains many place-names in the Basque language and details the many anchorages along the coast between Newfoundland and Tadoussac (present-day Quebec). Along with the Portuguese, the Basques were early arrivals to the fishing grounds off the coast of Newfoundland. They began whaling and fishing for cod in these waters around 1525. Their method was to ...
Course of the Rivers and Streams Flowing to the West from the North of Lake Superior
Shown here is a manuscript map depicting the “course of the rivers and streams flowing westward from the north of Lake Superior.” The anonymous author of the map composed it “following a chart made by the Indian Ochagac and others.” Ochagac’s description of an “undrinkable body of water” with “ebb and flow” led the anonymous French mapmaker to draw conclusions about a great “Western River” that discharged itself into the “South Sea” (Pacific Ocean). The map shows different Native American nations, including the Sioux and the Assiniboine. The scale ...
Map of New Discoveries North of the South Sea, in Eastern Siberia and Kamchatka, and in Western New France
Carte des nouvelles découvertes au nord de la mer du sud tant à l'est de la Sibérie et du Kamtchatka qu'à l'ouest de la Nouvelle France (Map of new discoveries north of the South Sea, in Eastern Siberia and Kamchatka, and in western New France) was created in 1750 by the Philippe Buache (1700−73), son-in-law of the great French cartographer Guillaume de L’Isle (1675−1726), and Joseph-Nicolas de L’Isle (1688−1768), brother of Guillaume de L’Isle. The map is centered on the North ...
Map of the Ocean Showing the Different Routes of the Navigators around the World
Carte de l'Océan où sont tracées les différentes routes des navigateurs au tour du monde (Map of the ocean showing the different routes of the navigators around the world) was made by the French cartographer Jean-Nicolas Buache (1741−1825) to plan and subsequently chart the discoveries made on the voyage around the world of the French explorer Jean-François de Galaup La Pérouse (1741−88). In 1783 the French government decided to send an expedition to the Pacific to complete the work begun by the British explorer James Cook, and ...
Map of the New Discovery Made by the Jesuit Fathers in 1672 and Continued by Father Jacques Marquette, from the Same Group, Accompanied by a Few Frenchmen in the Year 1673, Named “Manitounie”
In May−July 1673 the French cartographer and explorer Louis Jolliet (1645−1700) and the Jesuit priest Father Jacques Marquette (1637−75) were the first Europeans to descend the Mississippi River from the region of the Great Lakes to its confluence with the Arkansas River. Their goal was to locate a passage to the Pacific Ocean. They soon noticed, however, that the Mississippi ran south in the direction of the Gulf of Mexico rather than west to the Pacific. They suspended their journey in present-day Arkansas, after the Quapaw Indians ...
Map of the North Atlantic Ocean, 1674
From the 1500s to the 1700s, explorers, geographers, and the royal government of France continued the search for a passage that would allow easy communication between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and better access to the treasures of the East Indies. Spurred by Indian reports, the idea of a special sea north of California emerged in the mid-17th century. Geographers quickly seized upon this hypothetical Western Sea and gave it a cartographic life. The de L’Isle family was at the heart of this geographic illusion. Denis de Rotis, a ...
Map of Northern America and Part of Southern America from the Mouth of the Saint Lawrence River to Cayenne Island with the New Discoveries of the Mississippi River or Colbert River
Attributed to the Abbé Claude Bernou and dated 1681, this very beautiful mural map of North America and the Gulf of Mexico is from the Navy Hydrographic Office Collection in the National Library of France. The collection goes back to Jean-Baptise Colbert (1619−83), minister of finance under King Louis XIV, whose objective was to gather knowledge about all the seacoasts of the world. The map shows many of the discoveries made by the French expeditions in the Mississippi Valley from 1672 to 1681 and indicates the position of three ...
Montreal Organ Book
The Livre d’orgue de Montréal (Montreal organ book) is the largest extant manuscript of French organ music of the period of Louis XIV (reigned 1643−1715). Labeled “Pièces d’orgue” (Organ pieces) on the spine, the 540-page book is comprised of 40 separate quires, or collections of leaves. The book has no table of contents or indication of composer, but 16 of its 398 pieces have been attributed to Nicolas Lebègue (1631–1702), organist to the king in France. Among Lebègue’s pieces in the manuscript are the “Tierces ...
Authorization Granted to Jacques Hertel de Cournoyer, to Travel to the Pays-d’En-Haut for the Purpose of Trading Furs
With this document dated April 30, 1721, and signed in Montreal, Philippe de Rigaud Vaudreuil (1643–1725), governor of New France, permitted Jacques Hertel de Cournoyer (1667–1748) to go to the Pays d'en Haut (a vast territory to the west of Montreal) with two canoes and eight men. Cournoyer was to serve Father Pierre-François-Xavier de Charlevoix (1682–1761), a priest who was traveling to the region ostensibly to visit missions, but who had been ordered by Philippe, duc d’Orléans, to find the western sea, thought to provide ...
Attack on Saint-Charles
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Views of the Quebec-Lake Saint-John Railway
This album contains 91 photographs taken between 1887 and 1890 by the Livernois Photography Studio of Quebec City. The photographs depict the development and economic expansion of the Saguenay Fjord and Lake Saint-John region of the province of Quebec at the end of the 19th century. Much of this growth was associated with the building of the new railroad system. The photographs show railroad construction, fishing, tourism activities, as well as various locations in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, including the village of Roberval. Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean is a vast area to the north of Quebec ...
Working Catholic Youth’s Second National Congress and Convention of 100 Marriages, Montreal, 1939
The Jeunesse ouvrière catholique (Working Catholic Youth) in Quebec produced this silent film in 1939, which depicts the Congrès des cent mariages (Convention of 100 Marriages) on the occasion of its Second National Congress. The film is in the Fonds d’archives de la Jeunesse ouvrière catholique (Working Catholic Youth Archive) at the Quebec National Library and Archives. The Canadian group was modeled after the “Jeunesse ouvrière chrétienne,” (JOC—Young Christian Workers) a Roman Catholic movement lead by Joseph Cardijn (1882–1967), a Belgian cardinal who founded it in 1912 ...
Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day
This silent film records the festivities of the Fête de la Saint-Jean-Baptiste (Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day or Saint John the Baptist Day) on June 24, 1945. The celebration, which also marks the revival of an older summer solstice rite, has been observed by the Quebecois since 1834, when Ludger Duvernay, editor of the newspaper La Minerve, decided to revive this tradition, previously interrupted by the Conquest of 1760.  He organized a banquet in the garden of lawyer John McDonnell. The celebration spread in subsequent years, until 1837, when Duvernay was exiled during ...
Maple Sugar and Cooperation
Produced by the Producteurs de sucre d'érable du Québec (Maple Sugar Producers of Quebec) and directed by Father Maurice Proulx (1902–88), this 1955 film features the history of the organization and its new techniques for maple syrup production, from scientific standardization in laboratories to advanced wrapping and packaging. Proulx, trained in agronomy before becoming a filmmaker, made 36 films for industry and the provincial government between 1934 and 1961. The film begins with the tapping and collecting of the maple sap in the springtime. It explains how Quebec ...
Catechism of the Diocese of Sens
Catéchisme du diocese de Sens (Catechism of the diocese of Sens) was printed in 1765 by order of Jean Joseph Languet, Archbishop of Sens (1677–1753), and used in the Diocese of Quebec until 1777, when the first edition of the Catéchisme à l'usage du diocèse de Québec (Catechism for use in the Diocese of Quebec) was published. In the absence of a printing press in New France, the availability of catechisms and other books was subject to the same hazards that affected the import of other goods from ...
A Proclamation. Whereas by Information upon Oath it Appears that, Louis Joseph Papineau, of the City of Montreal, Esquire, is Charged with the Crime of High Treason
A passionate advocate of the rights of French Canadians and a critic of British imperial rule, Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871) was a member of the House of Assembly representing Lower Canada (present-day Quebec Province) from 1808 to 1838. He was elected speaker of the Assembly and served from 1815 to 1837. As leader of the Canadian Party he went to London in 1823 to campaign against the union of Upper and Lower Canada. Papineau is known as the leader of the Patriote movement, which led to the rebellions of ...
Monsieur Blondin! The Most Famous Tightrope Dancer in the World
Most likely used as a poster, this 1860 broadside mounted on wall paper advertises the show of the famous French tightrope walker Monsieur Blondin. Jean-Francois Gravelet (1824–97), also known as Charles Blondin or the Great Blondin, was born in France. By the age of five he was able to walk on a rope stretched between two kitchen chairs. He repeated his tight roping feats for the next 70 years, taking more and more risks, until his death in London in 1897. Blondin became a household name in Canada when ...
Quebec and Lake Saint-John Railway: View from Saint-Raymond Station
This image is part of a collection of 91 photographs taken between 1887 and 1890 by the Livernois Photography Studio of Quebec City. The photographs depict the development and economic expansion of the Saguenay Fjord and Lake Saint-John region of the province of Quebec at the end of the 19th century. Much of this growth was associated with the building of the new railroad system. The photographs show railroad construction, fishing, tourism activities, as well as various locations in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, including the village of Roberval. Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean is a vast area ...
Quebec and Lake Saint-John Railway: Saint-Raymond Village
This image is part of a collection of 91 photographs taken between 1887 and 1890 by the Livernois Photography Studio of Quebec City. The photographs depict the development and economic expansion of the Saguenay Fjord and Lake Saint-John region of the province of Quebec at the end of the 19th century. Much of this growth was associated with the building of the new railroad system. The photographs show railroad construction, fishing, tourism activities, as well as various locations in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, including the village of Roberval. Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean is a vast area ...
Quebec and Lake Saint-John Railway: View of Lake Sergent
This image is part of a collection of 91 photographs taken between 1887 and 1890 by the Livernois Photography Studio of Quebec City. The photographs depict the development and economic expansion of the Saguenay Fjord and Lake Saint-John region of the province of Quebec at the end of the 19th century. Much of this growth was associated with the building of the new railroad system. The photographs show railroad construction, fishing, tourism activities, as well as various locations in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, including the village of Roberval. Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean is a vast area ...
Quebec and Lake Saint-John Railway: Lake Saint-Joseph Railroad Station
This image is part of a collection of 91 photographs taken between 1887 and 1890 by the Livernois Photography Studio of Quebec City. The photographs depict the development and economic expansion of the Saguenay Fjord and Lake Saint-John region of the province of Quebec at the end of the 19th century. Much of this growth was associated with the building of the new railroad system. The photographs show railroad construction, fishing, tourism activities, as well as various locations in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, including the village of Roberval. Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean is a vast area ...
Quebec and Lake Saint-John Railway: Lake Saint-Joseph Landing
This image is part of a collection of 91 photographs taken between 1887 and 1890 by the Livernois Photography Studio of Quebec City. The photographs depict the development and economic expansion of the Saguenay Fjord and Lake Saint-John region of the province of Quebec at the end of the 19th century. Much of this growth was associated with the building of the new railroad system. The photographs show railroad construction, fishing, tourism activities, as well as various locations in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, including the village of Roberval. Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean is a vast area ...
Quebec and Lake Saint-John Railway: Lumber Mill, Likely on Lake Saint-Joseph
This image is part of a collection of 91 photographs taken between 1887 and 1890 by the Livernois Photography Studio of Quebec City. The photographs depict the development and economic expansion of the Saguenay Fjord and Lake Saint-John region of the province of Quebec at the end of the 19th century. Much of this growth was associated with the building of the new railroad system. The photographs show railroad construction, fishing, tourism activities, as well as various locations in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, including the village of Roberval. Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean is a vast area ...
Quebec and Lake Saint-John Railway: Lake Saint-Joseph
This image is part of a collection of 91 photographs taken between 1887 and 1890 by the Livernois Photography Studio of Quebec City. The photographs depict the development and economic expansion of the Saguenay Fjord and Lake Saint-John region of the province of Quebec at the end of the 19th century. Much of this growth was associated with the building of the new railroad system. The photographs show railroad construction, fishing, tourism activities, as well as various locations in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, including the village of Roberval. Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean is a vast area ...
Quebec and Lake Saint-John Railway: Sautoriski River
This image is part of a collection of 91 photographs taken between 1887 and 1890 by the Livernois Photography Studio of Quebec City. The photographs depict the development and economic expansion of the Saguenay Fjord and Lake Saint-John region of the province of Quebec at the end of the 19th century. Much of this growth was associated with the building of the new railroad system. The photographs show railroad construction, fishing, tourism activities, as well as various locations in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, including the village of Roberval. Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean is a vast area ...