5 results in English
Constantinople
This colored travel sketch of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) as seen from the eastern part of the town of Scutari (present-day Üsküdar) across the Bosporus Strait is by the Danish painter Martinus Rørbye (1803–48), a central figure in the "Golden Age" of Danish art (circa 1770–1900). After training at the Kunstakademiet, Rørbye travelled widely, to France, Italy, Greece, and Turkey. In 1833 he was one of the first artists to paint in Skagen, in the far north of Denmark, some 45 years before it became an artists’ haven. He ...
Cypresses and Road Leading to the Cemetery, Scutari, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of a scene from Scutari (present-day Üsküdar) on the edge of Constantinople (Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Resting on the Asian side of the Bosphorus, Scutari was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as a “large suburb of Constantinople… its fine old mosques, its crooked streets, and its small timber houses give it a more Oriental characteristic than Stambul. Until a ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Mosque and Street, Scutari, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of a mosque and street scene in Scutari (present-day Üsküdar) on the edge of Constantinople (Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located on the Asian side of the Bosporus, Üsküdar was settled in the seventh century BC and was called Skoutarion in Byzantine times, probably after the leather shields of the imperial guards (scutari means “raw tanned leather”). It was known as Escutaire or Eksüdar to the successive waves of invading Persians, Macedonians ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Scutari, Constantinople, Turkey, I
This photochrome print of a street scene in Scutari (present-day Üsküdar), located on the edge of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul), is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The area is where, during the Crimean War (1853–56), Florence Nightingale worked for the British Army at Scutari Barracks Hospital. Located on the Asian side of the Bosphorus, Scutari was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as a “large suburb ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Scutari, Constantinople, Turkey, II
This photochrome print of a street in Scutari (present-day Üsküdar), located on the edge of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul), is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Situated on the Asian side of the Bosphorus, Scutari was one of several areas outside the Constantinople city walls and was known for its important cemeteries and busy waterfront. It was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as a “large suburb of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress