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28 results
Ismāʻīl, the Persian Ambassador of Ṭahmāsp, King of Persia
Melchior Lorck, or Lorichs (1527–circa 1590), was the most brilliant graphic artist in 16th-century Denmark. He was born in Flensburg of distinguished parents; the Danish kings took up residence in the Lorck house when visiting the city. In 1549 King Christian III gave Lorck financial support to go on an educational journey. Lorck’s wanderlust led him throughout Europe and in the end to Vienna, where he gained employment with Emperor Charles V. From 1555 to 1559 Lorck was one of three ambassadors sent by the emperor to Constantinople ...
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Royal Library (The), Denmark
Constantinople
This colored travel sketch of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) as seen from the eastern part of the town of Scutari (present-day Üsküdar) across the Bosporus Strait is by the Danish painter Martinus Rørbye (1803–48), a central figure in the "Golden Age" of Danish art (circa 1770–1900). After training at the Kunstakademiet, Rørbye travelled widely, to France, Italy, Greece, and Turkey. In 1833 he was one of the first artists to paint in Skagen, in the far north of Denmark, some 45 years before it became an artists’ haven. He ...
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Royal Library (The), Denmark
"Imperial" Menologion
This manuscript, created in the Byzantine Empire in the second quarter of the 11th century, contains the biographies of saints whom the church commemorates in the month of January. It was originally part of a set containing volumes for each month of the year. A companion volume, with texts for March, now survives in Moscow (State Historical Museum, MS gr. 183). Each chapter in both manuscripts opens with a miniature depicting the death of a respective saint, or less often, another significant event from his or her life. Each text ...
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Walters Art Museum
Trebizond Gospels
This Gospel book was probably made in Constantinople in the mid-12th century and is remarkable for the fine execution and monumental quality of its full-page miniatures. The opening for the Gospel of Matthew is missing, but the other three Gospels are prefaced with a pair of miniatures each: the respective Evangelist on the left and a scene from the Gospel story on the right. The combination of Saint John with the Raising of Lazarus is one found only in this manuscript. The text was copied by two scribes with distinctly ...
Contributed by
Walters Art Museum
Baker Standing in Front of the "American Bakery," Ortaköy, Istanbul, Turkey
This photograph of an unusual bakery in Istanbul, Turkey, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives ...
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Library of Congress
Photo-Panoramic View of Constantinople
Hatchik “Christopher” Oscanyan (born 1818) was an author, diplomat, and publisher of the first Armenian-language newspaper in Constantinople. A native of Constantinople, Oscanyan was educated in New York City, to which he would later return as Ottoman consul-general. He energetically promoted the Ottoman Empire in a variety of media, including a London exhibition entitled the “Oriental and Turkish Museum” (1853), a popular book entitled The Sultan and His People (1887), and photographs such as this one. “Panoramic” photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view ...
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Library of Congress
Panorama of Constantinople, Taken from the Galata Tower
The firm of Sébah & Joaillier was a partnership between Jean Pascal Sébah (son of the eminent Ottoman photographer Pascal Sébah) and the Frenchman Polycarpe Joaillier. The firm became official photographer to the Ottoman sultan and was responsible for an enormous number of photographs from throughout the Ottoman Empire. Panoramic photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. This panorama, most likely taken in the late 1880s, is comprised of ten photographs spliced together to give the viewer a broader image than would have been practical ...
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Library of Congress
The Fountain of Sultan Ahmed, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Fountain of Sultan Ahmed III in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The fountain was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as having been “erected in 1728, the finest sebil [fountain] in the city, with a well-preserved timber roof.” The rounded towers at the angles covered with grilles would have allowed kiosk attendants inside to provide cups of ...
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Library of Congress
A Street at Stamboul with Fountain, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of a street in Stambul (on the European side of Constantinople, present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The scene shows the Koca Sinan Pasha complex in the Fatih part of the city. It includes a sebil (fountain) and the tomb of Ottoman architect Sinan (1489 or 1490–1588). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described Stambul as “the chief seat of the Oriental ...
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Library of Congress
Kara-Keui (Galata) Bridge, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Galata Bridge spanning the Golden Horn on the western side of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, the bridge, which links the Stambul and Galata districts of the city, was “originally built of timber in 1845, and called Sultan Valideh Bridge after its founder (the ‘sultan’s mother’), and was rebuilt in ...
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Library of Congress
Kara-Keui (Galata) and View of Pera, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the neighborhood of Kara-Keui (Galata) in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) with a view of Pera is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). One theory, among others, is that the name Galata derives from the Italian term calata (descent), which would be fitting for the neighborhood of steep streets with many stairs sloping down to the Golden Horn. The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers states that Pera ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
A Part of the Eyoub (i.e., Uyüp) Cemetery, I, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Uyüp (now Eyüp) Cemetery in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described the cemetery and its mosque as having been “built of white marble by Mohammed II, the Conqueror, in 1459, adjacent to the türbeh of Abu Eyúb Ensari, the legendary standard-bearer of the prophet, whose tomb here was revealed in a vision a ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
A Part of the Eyoub (i.e., Uyüp) Cemetery, II, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Uyüp (now Eyüp) Cemetery in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Eyüp takes its name from Abū Ayyūb al-Anṣārī (died circa 672), the standard bearer and companion of the Prophet Muhammad, whose tomb is located here, together with a mosque built in his honor. The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers describes how “from the mosque, up the hill-side to the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Burnt Column, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Burnt Column in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described this structure, built of stone brought from Heliopolis, Egypt, as a “great column of porphyry…erected by Constantine on the ancient ‘triumphal way’, to mark the centre of his forum.” Until 1106, the column bore a bronze statue of the emperor, who founded the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
View from the Bridge, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print showing a view of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) from the Galata Bridge is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The large building in the top left of the image is Hagia Sophia (Aya Sofya), originally a Greek Orthodox basilica, later an imperial mosque, and in modern times a museum. According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, the Galata Bridge spanning the Golden Horn between the Stambul ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Stamboul, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The print shows the inner district of Stambul, as seen from across the Golden Horn. The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described Stambul as “the chief seat of the Oriental merchants and the petty traders” in Constantinople, where “the old Oriental characteristics of the city still survive,” despite the ravages of “destructive fires (as in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Seraskierat (i.e., Seraskerat) (War Ministry), Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Seraskerat (Ministry of War) in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described how “the Serasker Kapu, the modern southern gateway, leads into the court, now a drilling-ground, of the Seraskerat (ministry of war). Here once stood the Eski-Serai, the oldest palace of the sultans. The Serasker Tower, about 200 feet [61 meters] high, built ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Sultan Bajazid's (i.e., Beyazit's) Mosque, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Sultan Bayezid II Mosque in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located on the third hill of the city, on the site of the Forum of Theodosius in the old district of Stambul, the mosque was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers:The handsome portals of the forecourt recall Seljuk prototypes. The beautiful forecourt, enlivened ever since the ...
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Library of Congress
Top Capou (i.e. Top Kapı), Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print showing the Topkapi Gate in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Top kapi means “Cannon Gate.” Cannons, which also gave their name to the Topkapi Palace in Constantinople, were the key to the conquest of the city by Mehmed II in 1453. They enabled him to breach the city walls for only the second time since they were fortified by Emperor Theodosius II in the fifth century. The gate and the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Yeni-Djama (i.e., Yeni Cami) by Moonlight, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Yeni Valide Camii (New Mosque of the Sultan’s Mother) in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The mosque adjoins the harbor on the southern bank of the Golden Horn by the Galata Bridge. It was begun in 1597 by Safiye, mother of Mehmed III, and finished in 1663 by order of Turhan Hatice, mother of Mehmed IV, placing it in a tradition of architectural commissions by Ottoman sultan ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Byzantine Wall near Irdikale, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Byzantine wall near Irdikale, Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The ruins of the wall of the ancient Greek city of Byzantium run alongside the Yedikule Gardens in present-day Yedikule, Istanbul. Throughout its history Constantinople was known for its impregnable walls. In 324 AD, the Roman emperor Constantine captured Byzantium, renamed it after himself, and in 330 proclaimed the city the capital of the empire. Constantine constructed a new ...
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Library of Congress