82 results in English
The Compendium of Graces and Fountain of Charms
This 17th-century manuscript contains the text of Majmoo’a al-Latā’if wa-Yanbu‘ al-Zarā’if (The compendium of graces and fountain of charms), a collection of esoteric and mystic prayers. The work is divided into many chapters, unnumbered and typically only a few pages long, with rubrications indicating the beginning of each chapter. The work discusses the spiritual expediency of praying in a certain manner; on a certain Islamic month, day of the week, or religious occasion, citing sayings of the Prophet Muhammad and other Islamic tradition as supporting arguments. The ...
Mosque of Abderrahman, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Sidi Abderrahman [Abdul Rahman, Abdel Rahman, Abdurrahman] Mosque in Algiers, Algeria, circa 1899. According to Cook’s Practical Guide to Algiers, Algeria, and Tunisia (1904), “With the exception of the Djama el Kebir…this is the oldest religious building in Algiers…. The marabout [popular saint] Abd er Rahman et Thalebi was born in 1387 and died in 1471. The mosque was built between these dates and contains ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Cathedral of St. Philippe in Algiers, originally the Ketchaoua mosque, which had been converted to a Christian place of worship under the French occupation. The structure was rededicated as a mosque following Algeria’s independence in 1962. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Harbor and Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts Algiers's harbor, which had been redesigned and greatly expanded by the French in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Babel-Oued from Casbah, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts Babel-Oued (Bab El Oued), a neighborhood of Algiers, as seen from the fortified citadel, or Casbah. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into color images and printing them ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Harbor by Moonlight, II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Dating from 1899, it depicts a section of the harbor of Algiers. The harbor was first constructed in 1518 under the reign of the Turkish admiral, Khair-ed-in. For hundreds of years, Algerian pirates maintained and secured the harbor against the naval powers of Europe. When the French occupied Algeria in the 1830s, they made the harbor a center of commerce and naval power, and greatly expanded the port, which ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Government Place, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the 1905 catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts Government Place in Algiers around 1899. This square was considered the heart of the city. According to Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911), it was “the noisiest place in the town, crowded with natives at all hours.” The white building is the Djemâa el-Djedid mosque, which Baedeker described as "curiously incongruous" for its mix of Byzantine, Italian, Andalusian, and Turkish architectural styles. Other buildings ...
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Interior of Notre Dame d'Afrique, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Cathedral of Notre Dame d’Afrique, which was established in 1872 under Cardinal Charles Lavigerie (the initiator of the Missionary Order of Our Lady of Africa, or “White Fathers”) and designed by the French architect Fromageau. Baedeker’s 1911 The Mediterranean described the cathedral as “a pilgrimage-church for sick persons and mariners…. From the terrace in front of the church, where the blessing of the sea by ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Museum: Entrance Hall, I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the entrance hall and courtyard of a museum in Algiers--most likely the Musée National des Antiquités Algeriennes, opened in 1897, and described by Baedeker’s The Mediterranean (1911) as “containing the finest collection of the kind in Algeria.” The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Place de la Republique, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Place de la république (Republic plaza) in the capital city of Algiers, circa 1899. Baedeker’s 1911 The Mediterranean spoke admiringly of “the spacious Place de la République, with the gardens of Square Bresson, adorned with bamboos and magnolias, the Théâtre Municipal, and the most showy cafés.” The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Great Mosque in the Marine Street, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Great Mosque (al-Djemaa al-Kabir), which Baedeker’s The Mediterranean described in 1911 as “the oldest and largest mosque in the town, founded in 1018 for believers in the Malekite ritual…. Both the mosque and its minaret, originally built by the Abdel-wadite Abû Tâkhfîn in 1322-3, have now been modernized. The entrance is by a portico in the Rue de la Marine, erected in 1837.” The Detroit Photographic ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Compagnie Algérienne. Subscribe. Liberation Loan
This poster from 1918, the last year of World War I, advertises the “Liberation Loan” issued by the French government. Parts of France had been occupied by Germany since 1914, and by 1918, the exhausted French people were hoping for victory and the liberation of occupied territory. Algeria was an overseas territory administered as an integral part of France, and this poster was commissioned by an Algerian financial institution, the Compagnie Algérienne, seeking subscribers to the loan. The poster shows an Algerian man, presumably a warrior, on horseback. Around 500 ...
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National Loan 1920 - Compagnie Algérienne
This poster, published in 1920, advertises the 5 percent state loan, known as the “Recovery Loan,” issued by the government of France to finance reconstruction after World War I. Algeria was at this time an overseas territory administered as an integral part of France, and the poster was commissioned by an Algerian financial institution, the Compagnie Algérienne. The poster shows Algerian men with a flock of sheep on a pier, watching a ship, most likely bound for France, being loaded with goods. The illustration is by Henri Villain (1878–1938 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
For Your Country. Subscribe to the Loan. Crédit Foncier d'Algérie et de Tunisie
This World War I poster, sponsored by the Crédit Foncier d'Algérie et de Tunisie, a financial institution serving Algeria and Tunisia, urges people to subscribe to the fourth national loan, issued by the French government in 1918. The poster shows Algerian and Tunisian soldiers on horses charging into battle. France recruited troops from its overseas territories and colonies, and between 1914 and 1918, the French army deployed 172,800 soldiers from Algeria and 60,000 soldiers from Tunisia to Europe. Initially, most colonial troops were volunteers, but as the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
For the Return, Subscribe. 4th National Loan. Crédit Foncier d'Algérie et de Tunisie
This World War I poster, sponsored by the Crédit Foncier d'Algérie et de Tunisie, a financial institution serving Algeria and Tunisia, urges people to subscribe to the fourth national loan, issued by the French government in 1918. The poster shows a ship steaming into the beautiful harbor of Algiers, with Algerian women and children overlooking the harbor and as they await the return of their husbands, fathers, and brothers. The poster implies that victory in the war and the return of the men to Algeria will be hastened by ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Western Sahara
This map by Ernest George Ravenstein (1834-1913) appeared in the London Geographical Magazine in 1876. Ravenstein was a British geographer and fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. He is best remembered for his pioneering Laws of Migration, published in 1885, which provided the theoretical underpinning for much subsequent scientific work on migration. This map shows the Sahara Desert, from present-day eastern Mali to the Atlantic Ocean. Shown in red are the tracks of the important 19th-century explorers who crossed the desert, including the Frenchman René-Auguste Callié (1799-1838), who in 1827-28 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Qur’an
This manuscript is a fragment of the Qur'an, consisting of chapters 19 (Sūrat Maryam) through 23 (Sūrat al-mu’minūn). It was produced in the Maghreb and dates from the 12th century AH (18th century AD). The text is written in a large Maghrebī script, with vocalization in red, green, and yellow ink on Italian paper. The codex opens with an illuminated chapter heading for chapter 19 written in the New Abbasid (broken cursive) style (folio 1b) in gold ink within a decorative headpiece. The titles of other chapters are ...
Contributed by Walters Art Museum
General View from Mustapha, I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of Algiers, taken from the neighborhood of Mustapha, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Mustapha, at the southern end of the city, was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as “the industrial quarters of Algiers.” However, as this image shows, Mustapha Supérieur also had fine hotels and villas set in beautiful gardens. The photograph depicts the harbor with a splendid view of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View from Mustapha, II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of Algiers, taken from the neighborhood of Mustapha, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Mustapha, at the southern end of the city and at that time sometimes considered a separate entity, was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as “the industrial quarters of Algiers.” The photograph depicts the harbor with a splendid view of the bay as well as of the Champ de ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
From the Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed by Kheireddin Barbarossa.” Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546) was a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French expanded the port at great cost in the mid-19th ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Harbor from the Lighthouse, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed by Kheireddin Barbarossa.” Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546) was a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French expanded the port at great cost in the mid-19th ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Harbor by Moonlight, I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed by Kheireddin Barbarossa.” Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546) was a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French expanded the port at great cost in the mid-19th ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Moonlight View, with Lighthouse, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Also seen in the image is one of the harbor’s lighthouses, built in 1544, on the site of an old Spanish castle and the fort of Peñón. According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the admiralty in the port of Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The original Spanish port was destroyed and rebuilt by Kheireddin Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546), a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French greatly expanded the port and occupied the neo-Moorish Palais de l’Amirauté (Admiralty Palace). As described by the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “one could traverse ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Cemetery, with Chapel, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (died 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Cemetery, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (died 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Part of the Cemetery, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (d. 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Fountain in Mosque of El Kebir, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the Great Mosque in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Al-Djamaa el-Kabir (the Great Mosque) was first built in about 1097 and, although subsequently much modified, is regarded as a rare architectural survival of the Almoravid period in North Africa. Abu Takhfin added the minaret in 1322–24; the French added the gallery on the outside of the building in 1837–40 when they rebuilt the street. According to the 1911 edition ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Museum: Entrance Hall, II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the Musée National des Antiquités Algériennes in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The museum, which opened in 1897, was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as containing “the finest collection of the kind in Algeria.” The print depicts the museum’s entrance hall, holding part of the collection of ancient columns and sculpture. The hall shows the fine decorative architectural ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Notre Dame d’Afrique and Carmelite Convent, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the Notre Dame d’Afrique church in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Notre Dame d’Afrique was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as “a pilgrimage-church for sick persons and mariners, founded by Card. Lavigerie in 1872, [which] rises conspicuously on a spur of the N.E. slope of Mont Bouzaréah, above the Christian and the Jewish burial-grounds.” The church ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Algiers Viewed from Outside Notre Dame d’Afrique
This photochrome print of Algiers as seen from the Notre Dame d’Afrique church is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Notre Dame d’Afrique was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as rising “conspicuously on a spur of the N.E. slope of Mont Bouzaréah, above the Christian and the Jewish burial-grounds. From the terrace in front of the church, where the blessing of the sea ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Interior of Governors Palace, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the governor’s palace in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The palace, Dar Hassan Pacha, was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as having been “one of the latest specimens of Moorish-Turkish architecture in Algeria; but it has been entirely remodeled to suit its present purpose and has been provided with a new façade.” Pasha Hassan, finance minister to the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Harbor with Warships, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of warships in the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In the early 1900s, the French navy was organized into seven marine districts: Cherbourg, Brest, Lorient, and Rochefort on the Atlantic; Toulon on the Mediterranean coast of France; Cochin-China in Asia; and Algeria on the North African coast. As the headquarters of the Algerian marine district, Algiers was an important strategic point. At the time, the French fleet ranked second in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Warships, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of warships in the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In the early 1900s, the French navy was organized into seven marine districts: Cherbourg, Brest, Lorient, and Rochefort on the Atlantic; Toulon on the Mediterranean coast of France; Cochin-China in Asia; and Algeria on the North African coast. As the headquarters of the Algerian marine district, Algiers was an important strategic point. At the time, the French fleet ranked second in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Warship, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a warship in the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In the early 1900s, the French navy was organized into seven marine districts: Cherbourg, Brest, Lorient, and Rochefort on the Atlantic; Toulon on the Mediterranean coast of France; Cochin-China in Asia; and Algeria on the North African coast. As the headquarters of the Algerian marine district, Algiers was an important strategic point. At the time, the French fleet ranked second ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Disembarking from a Ship, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of passengers disembarking from a ship in the harbor in Algiers, and meeting and greeting people on the quay, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). After seizing Algiers from the Ottomans in 1830, the French made the city a military and administrative headquarters for their colonial empire in North and West Africa. The city was particularly important for its strategic harbor, located in the Bay of Algiers. The French promoted immigration to Algiers, and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Disembarking from a Ship, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of passengers disembarking from a ship in the harbor in Algiers, and being helped into small boats for transfer to shore, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). After seizing Algiers from the Ottomans in 1830, the French made the city a military and administrative headquarters for their colonial empire in North and West Africa. The city was particularly important for its strategic harbor, located in the Bay of Algiers. The French promoted immigration to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Passengers Disembarking, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of passengers disembarking from a ship in the harbor in Algiers into a fleet of boats for transfer to shore is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). After seizing Algiers from the Ottomans in 1830, the French made the city a military and administrative headquarters for their colonial empire in North and West Africa. The city was particularly important for its strategic harbor, located in the Bay of Algiers. The French promoted immigration to Algiers ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Steamship "Normannia", Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the steamship Normannia in the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Constructed in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1890, the Normannia was one of four twin-propeller steamers belonging to the Hamburg-American Line that regularly crossed the Atlantic from Hamburg, Germany, and Southampton, England to New York. The ship displaced 8,374.26 metric tons and was 152.40 meters long and 17.53 meters wide. The Normannia was severely damaged in January ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Street of the Camels, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of women and a child on the Street of the Camels in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Casbah of Algiers was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and searoutes: Handbook for Travellers as presenting “a highly attractive picture of Oriental life,” where “a few streets only, with small mosques, coffee-houses, and shops, show signs of life in the daytime, and that chiefly on Fridays and Sundays ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Red Sea Street, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of women on Red Sea Street in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Casbah of Algiers was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and searoutes: Handbook for Travellers as presenting “a highly attractive picture of Oriental life,” where “a few streets only, with small mosques, coffee-houses, and shops, show signs of life in the daytime, and that chiefly on Fridays and Sundays. Most of the streets, however ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Beggars in front of the Mosque “Sidi Abderrhaman,” Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the Mosque of Sidi Abderrahman in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The mosque was built in 1696 and dedicated to the learned marabout (holy man or mystic) Sidi Abderrahman (circa 1387–1468). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and searoutes: Handbook for Travellers told tourists that the mosque “has no attraction beyond its elegant minaret, adorned with coloured tiles; but its situation near the Jardin Marengo, and the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress