17 results in English
The Pilgrimage of Alpha (Manuel Ancízar) in the Northern Provinces of New Granada, 1850–51
Peregrinación de Alpha (Manuel Ancízar) por las provincias del norte de la Nueva Granada, en 1850 i 51 (The pilgrimage of Alpha (Manuel Ancízar) in the northern provinces of New Granada, 1850–51) consists of articles written by Manuel Ancízar (1812–82), published in book form in 1853. Ancízar, who wrote under the pseudonym Alpha, was secretary of the Comisión Corográfica (Chorographic Commission) of New Granada (the Spanish viceroyalty that comprised all or parts of present-day Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, and Venezuela). Formed in 1849, the commission included engineers and geographers ...
Chair of the Chief of the Panches
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the carved wooden chair of a Panche chieftain. It was executed in Neiva Province (present-day Cundinamarca Department) in 1857. The Panches were an Amerindian people who, in pre-Columbian times, predominated in this part of west-central Colombia. At the start of the 16th century there were at least 30,000 Panches, but they resisted colonial rule and did not long survive the arrival of the conquistadors. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of ...
The Pacho Ironworks, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the rural village of Pacho, in Bogotá Province (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia, with the large ironworks in the foreground. The foundry, which was the first in Latin America, was established in 1814 to exploit the extensive iron deposits in the local mountains. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups. Paz was born in ...
Laguna de Siecha, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows Laguna de Siecha, in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department) in west-central Colombia. The lake was of religious significance to the indigenous local Chibcha Muisca people, who were believed to have made gold offerings to their deities at the lake. Settlers in search of gold drained the lake in colonial times, but it has since refilled. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional ...
Natural Bridge, Called the “Land Bridge,” Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) of a scene in Bogotá Province (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia shows two men and their pack animals high on the rocky terrain above a river. Another man stands closer to the water. The caption on the painting indicates that the pack train is en route from Pandi to Cunday (in present-day Tolima Department) and that the river – possibly the Sumapaz – emerges after running underground for more than 300 meters. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of ...
Guatavita Lake, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows Guatavita Lake in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting states that the lake, situated at an altitude of 3,139 meters, was a “notorious place of worship of the aboriginal people.” The lake was a sacred place to the local Chibcha Muisca people, who revered its water deity. The initiation rites of their chiefs, in which the new chief, covered in gold dust, would dive into the lake and other gold offerings would be ...
Panoramic View of the Town and District of Pacho, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the town of Pacho, Bogotá Province (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia, where, as the caption explains, a rich iron mine was located. Situated in the Andes at an altitude of 1,900 meters, Pacho was the site of the first foundry in Latin America, established in 1814. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups ...
View of the Town of Pandi, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the town of Pandi in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting indicates that the town is located  “less than a half league [about two kilometers] from the natural bridge of Icononzo over the Sumapaz River, full of erratic stones, 1,000 meters above sea level, with a particular group of hieroglyphs made by the Chibchas Indians.” The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and ...
View of the Plain of Fusagasugá, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the llano, or plain, of Fusagasugá in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting indicates that this was a place of relaxation for the inhabitants of Bogota. “It is located over 1,772 meters over the sea level, with an average temperature of 20.5 centigrade. At a distance from the capital of 11 1/2 Granadan leagues.” The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia ...
View of the City of Cipaquirá, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the city of Cipaquirá in the province of Bogotá (present-day Zipaquirá, Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting indicates that this was where a rich mine of sal gema (halite) was found. The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity and Saint Anthony of Padua is prominent in the image. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial ...
Wooden Bridge over the Cuja River, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the wooden bridge over the Cuja River in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. A man and his mule are crossing the bridge. The scene is near Fusagasugá, an area of Colombia known for its natural beauty and pleasant climate. The Cuja flows north into the Caribbean. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial ...
Bridge of the Common over the Funza River or Bogotá River, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the Bridge of the Common over the Bogotá River in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The bridge over the Bogotá (previously called the Funza) was built by a Spanish engineer, Domingo Esquiaqui, and opened to traffic in 1796. The name of the bridge derives from its having been paid for by local landowners and others who benefited from its construction. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and ...
Erratic Stone, near the Town of Pandi, with Hieroglyphs made by the Indians, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows an unusual red-painted and inscribed rock in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting identifies the scene as that of an “erratic stone, located near the town of Pandi, close to another group, with hieroglyphs made by the Indians, all facing the Boquerón, from where the Sumapaz runs down to the Magdalena.” The monolith is one of the first recorded sites of rock art in Colombia, and the “hieroglyphs” are pictographs made by the local ...
Rocks with Hieroglyphics Made by the Indigenous People, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) depicts a rugged scene in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting identifies the scene as that of “stones with hieroglyphs made by the Indians, close to the Facatativá [River], facing the savannah of Bogotá.” The “hieroglyphs” are pictographs made by local people, probably in pre-colonial times. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s ...
A Family Excursion Close to Bogotá, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows a large family group on an excursion near Bogotá, in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. People of different ages are seated on a rug, engaged in various activities. A man plays the guitar and a couple dances. Local people, including two mounted men, watch from the back. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic ...
Tequendama Falls, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows Tequendama Falls, in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting indicates that the falls are 146 meters high, located at 2,467 meters above sea level, and 4 ½ leagues distant from the capital city of Bogotá. According to more accurate present-day measurements, the falls are 157 meters high, and located 32 kilometers west of the capital. At the falls, the Bogotá River plunges down a rocky gorge that is only 18 meters wide at ...
Group of Rocks with Hieroglyphs near Pandi, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) depicts a scene in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting identifies the subject as a “group of stones near the town of Pandi, with hieroglyphs made by the Indians, facing the Boqueron, close to the old lake of Fusagasuga, probably when the upper lake of Sumapaz fell, which led to the discovery of an underground river, on top of which sits the natural bridge of Icononzo. It could be said that the Indians wanted to ...