4 results in English
Fortress of Brum in Pernambuco
This 19th-century plan, made by a captain in the Brazilian Army’s inspectorate of fortresses, shows the fortress at Brum, which was constructed by the Dutch and the Portuguese in the 17th century.
A Most Accurate Picture of Brazil
This early map showing Bahia state in Brazil is the work of Henricus Hondius (died 1638), a member of a famous Dutch mapmaking family. His father, Jodocus Hondius (1563-1612), acquired the plates for Gerard Mercator’s Atlas in 1604, and in 1606 published a new edition of this work. Henricus and his brother-in-law, Jan Jannson (died 1664), published the Novus Atlas (New atlas) in 1637. Dutch maps of the 16th century were marked by illustrated inserts, as seen on this map, and were generally the work of mapmaking families.
Old Recife
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. The port city of Recife, which appears in this photograph, was one of the earliest settlements in Brazil. Established in the late 1500s by the Portuguese, it was under ...
Hand-Drawn Maps and Plans of Recife in Pernambuco, All Saints’ Bay, and the Coast from Bahia to Gãmam…
This six-leaved, hand-drawn atlas shows the coastal area of Brazil’s Pernambuco and Bahia states as they appeared in the early 1630s. The maps include details of the city of Recife and All Saints’ Bay, as well as details of the coastline. The area was first settled by the Portuguese in 1534, and Pernambuco was one of Portugal’s only profitable Brazilian colonies during the early colonial period. The area benefitted from successful cotton and sugar cultivation. Pernambuco came under Dutch rule in 1630, around the time these maps were ...