7 results in English
Map of Lesser Antilles
Joan Vinckeboons (1617–70) was a Dutch cartographer and engraver born into a family of artists of Flemish origin. He was employed by the Dutch West India Company and for more than 30 years produced maps for use by Dutch mercantile and military shipping. He was a business partner of Joan Blaeu, one of the most important map and atlas publishers of the day. Vinckeboons drew a series of 200 manuscript maps that were used in the production of atlases, including Blaeu’s Atlas Maior. This pen-and-ink and watercolor map ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Ground Plan of the Works and Buildings on the Wood Estate of Peter Langford Brooke, Esq., Situated in the Parish of St. John's, Antigua
In the colonial period, the Langford Brooke family of Mere in Cheshire, England, owned several properties on the British island of Antigua. This document is a detailed ground plan of the works and buildings on the family’s Wood estate. A lettered index at the left indicates the various structures, which include the boiling house, still house, windmill, blacksmith’s shop, great house, and others. The drawing at the bottom center shows how water was supplied from a pond to the works on the estate. At the upper left is ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Map of the Estate of Peter Langford Brooke, Esquire, Called the Wood Situated in the Parish of St. John's, Antigua
In the colonial period, the Langford Brooke family of Mere in Cheshire, England, owned several properties on the island of Antigua. This map from 1821, based in part on an earlier map, shows the Wood estate with its 24 fields devoted to the growing of sugar cane. The index on the right indicates the works and buildings on the estate, and the exact sizes of the different fields. An accompanying ground plan, prepared by the same surveyor, depicted the estate’s works and buildings in more detail. Antigua’s earliest ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Plan of the Estate Called Jonas's Situated in the Division of North Sound in the Island of Antigua, the Property of Peter Langford Brooke, Esquire
In the colonial period, the Langford Brooke family of Mere in Cheshire, England, owned several properties on the island of Antigua. This map from 1821 shows the Jonas estate. The references at the right provide information about the shares of land devoted to growing sugar cane and to other uses, as well as a key to the plantation’s structures, which included the windmill, boiling house, curing house, rum cellar, the overseer’s rooms, the sick house and laying-in room, the great house and offices, and pens for mules and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Ground Plan of the Works and Buildings on the Estate of Peter Langford Brooke, Esquire, Called Jonas's in the Division of North Sound in the Island of Antigua
In the colonial period, the Langford Brooke family of Mere in Cheshire, England, owned several properties on the British island of Antigua. This document is a detailed ground plan of the works and buildings on the Wood estate. A lettered index at the left indicates the various structures on the estate, which include the boiling house, still house, windmill, blacksmith’s shop, great house, and many others. A dotted line at the center indicates a “pipe which conveys juice from the Mill to the boiling house.” An accompanying map, produced ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Plan of English Harbour
This well-executed, colored British map is of English Harbour, Antigua, one of the principal port facilities for British activities in the Caribbean in the18th century. The map shows the coastline, coastal features, extensive soundings, a navigational hazard, fortifications, shipyards, cultivated fields and vegetation, and an ornate wind rose. It also includes a keyed legend. The map indicates that the primary purpose of the port was as a naval depot and dry dock. The map is from the Howe Collection at the Library of Congress, which was acquired in 1905 from ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
About the Natural History of the Indies
Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo (1478–1557) was one of the most important early chroniclers of the Spanish presence in the Americas. Born in Madrid of noble parents from Asturias, at age 12 he became a page to the Duke of Villahermosa. He witnessed the surrender of Granada and, in 1492, entered the service of Prince Don Juan I, whose death in 1497 changed the path of his life. After living several years in Italy, Oviedo returned to Spain around 1505 and, from then onward, began traveling between the Iberian Peninsula ...
Contributed by National Library of Spain