16 results
Guide to the Great Siberian Railway
The 8,000-kilometer Trans-Siberian Railway linking Ekaterinburg in the Ural Mountains with the Pacific port of Vladivostok is the world’s longest railroad. Construction began in 1891 and was completed in 1916. By 1900, much of the line was finished and open for traffic. In that year, the Russian Ministry of Ways of Communication issued, in identical English and Russian editions, this illustrated guide to the railway. It includes a history of Siberia, an account of the construction, and a detailed listing of the towns and cities along the route.
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National Library of Russia
Map of the Far East of the USSR, Northern China (Manchuria) and Mongolia
This Soviet-era map is intended to serve a propaganda purpose. On the top and bottom are the slogans: "For the strengthening of the military-sanitary fund of the Red Cross"; "Citizens of the USSR must remember the Chinese adventure of 1929"; and " The Army and the Red Cross--together serving the defense of the USSR." Shown on the map are international borders, administrative borders on the territory of the USSR, population centers, railroad stations, and roads. The inset in the lower right is a schematic map of southern China. The portraits on ...
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National Library of Russia
Map of the Investigation of the Asiatic Part of the USSR for Hydrogeological Purposes in 1932
This map was created for use by a Soviet government research institute. By means of the color coding, it shows regions in Siberia where hydrogeological investigations had been carried out and divides those regions into three categories: detailed and special hydrogeological investigations from prospectors' experience…on a scale of two versts per inch; general hydrogeological investigations…more than two versts per inch; and geological, hydrogeological, soil, and other investigations eliciting the presence of underground water. The white areas, occupying by far the largest part of the map, indicate where neither ...
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National Library of Russia
Map of the Southern Half of Eastern Siberia and Parts of Mongolia, Manchuria, and Sakhalin: For a General Sketch of the Orography of Eastern Siberia
Orography is a branch of the science of geomorphology that deals with the disposition and character of hills and mountains. The orography of a region concerns its elevated terrain. This general sketch of the orography of eastern Siberia and adjacent areas shows hills, plateaus, lowlands, mountain ranges, and other features. Also shown are provincial and district centers, fortresses, Cossack villages, guard posts, factories and plants, mines, gold fields, monasteries, and postal and country roads.
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Russian State Library
Map of the New Discoveries in the Eastern Ocean
This Russian map of 1781 depicts parts of eastern Siberia and the northwestern part of the North American continent, including places reached by the Russians Mikhail Gvozdev and Ivan Sind, the English explorer Captain James Cook, and others. In 1732, the expedition led by Gvozdev and the navigator Ivan Fedorov crossed the Bering Strait between Asia and America, discovered the Diomede Islands, and approached Alaska in the vicinity of Cape Prince of Wales. The expedition landed on the shore of the North American mainland, marked on the map as the ...
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National Library of Russia
Map of Agricultural Areas of the Siberian Region
This Soviet-era map shows the agricultural areas of Siberia, district borders, railroads, rivers, lakes, district centers, and cities. Although much of Siberia is unsuited for farming, good conditions prevail in the forest steppe region of southwestern Siberia and in parts of southern Siberia. Peasants who migrated from European Russia in the 19th century had to adjust to Siberian conditions, learning, for example, to plant their crops neither too low in the wet taiga (which risked rot) nor too high on open lands (which risked frost). By the late 19th century ...
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Russian State Library
Map of Tobol'sk Province (16 Districts)
This map of the vast Siberian province of Tobol’sk shows the borders of the province and its districts, population centers, monasteries, winter encampments, fortresses, mines, salt and fish industries, and the routes of voyages by Malygin (1734, 1735), Skuratov (1734, 1735), Ovtsyn (1735), Murav'ev (1737), Pavlov (1737), Rozmyslov (1768), and the location where Dutch ships wintered in 1596. The title is in an artistic cartouche with a drawing of a hunting scene, mining symbols, and a maiden with an urn–an allegorical symbol of the Ob' River. The ...
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National Library of Russia
Map of the Western Part of Asiatic Russia as of 1807 and Notes About Siberia by a Member of the Privy Council of Senator M. Kornilov
This map depicts the western part of Asiatic Russia and includes the territory stretching from Ekaterinburg to Irkutsk (approximately 3,500 kilometers). Besides rivers, mountains, and cities, it shows settlements of different ethnic groups: Tungus, Ostyak, Kalmyk, and many others. The map incorporates remarks made by Alexei Kornilov, a governor of Irkutsk Province, then Tobol'sk Province, and later a senator. His notes, compiled in 1807, include information about the ethnic diversity of Irkutsk and Tobol'sk provinces, means of transportation, systems of government, and other topics. The right side ...
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National Library of Russia
From Tobol'sk to Obdorsk
This album of 32 original watercolors by the Tobol'sk artist M.S. Znamenskii is from the library of Tsar Nicholas II. The album was obtained for him in 1894 for 800 rubles following the death of the artist. Znamenskii painted the watercolors over a number of years and collected them in a birch-bark covered binding under the title "From Tobol'sk to Obdorsk." The subjects include scenes from Tobol'sk, Berezov, Obdorsk (present-day Salekhard), and other localities in Tobol’sk Province; the different ethnic groups living in this region ...
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Russian State Library
Report Map on the Hydrogeographic Work of Expeditions to the Eastern Ocean and by Squadron Ships in the Eastern Ocean for 1898 and Preceeding Years
Hydrographic maps mainly serve the needs of navigators and mariners. Other uses include fishing, oceanography, and underwater prospecting. Hydrographic mapping was highly developed in 19th-century Russia, where it was carried out by the Ministry of Marine to create and constantly update navigational charts. This map is from a larger work entitled Sobranie otchetnykh kart gidrograficheskikh rabot (Collection of Report Maps of Hydrogeographic Work and Maps Indicating Shipwrecks for 1898 in the Black Sea, Sea of Azov, Caspian Sea, White Sea, Baltic Sea, and Parts of the Eastern Ocean and ...
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National Library of Russia
We Live and Work According to Lenin: Atlas of the Novosibirsk Region
The Communist Party of the Soviet Union drew its legitimacy from the life and work of Vladimir I. Lenin, the leading figure of the Russian Revolution and the founder of the Soviet state. This late Soviet-era atlas of the Siberian region of Novosibirsk contains, in addition to its 32 maps, sections on V. I. Lenin and Siberia, the establishment of Soviet power in Novosibirsk, and the participation of the region in the Great Patriotic War (World War II), as well as descriptions of the industrial, agricultural, educational, and cultural achievements ...
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Russian State Library
Guide to the Great Siberian Railway
The 8,000-kilometer Trans-Siberian Railway linking Ekaterinburg in the Ural Mountains with the Pacific port of Vladivostok is the world’s longest railroad. Construction began in 1891 and was completed in 1916. By 1900, much of the line was finished and open for traffic. In that year, the Russian Ministry of Ways of Communication issued, in identical English and Russian editions, this illustrated guide to the railway. It includes a history of Siberia, an account of the construction, and a detailed listing of the towns and cities along the route.
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Asiatic Siberia. Map of the Siberia Region
This Soviet-era map shows population centers, spas, administrative borders, communication routes, piers, ports, mountains and elevated points, the height and depth (in meters) of natural features, rivers, lakes, swamps, mineral fields, mines, excavations, and newly-constructed factories. The colors on the inset maps in the upper and lower right denote the sea, tundra, and forested regions.
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National Library of Russia
Siberia and Migrants
In the 19th century, the government of Russia encouraged peasants to move from the western parts of the empire to untilled lands in Siberia. This book was intended as a guide for peasants interested in resettling. It contained information about the climate and soils of Siberia, conditions and economic opportunities, essential expenses for relocation and construction in a new place, as well as recommendations for the behavior of migrants in transit. The book was published in Khar'kov (Kharkiv, in Ukrainian) by the Khar’kov Society for the Expansion of ...
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Russian State Library
Map of Asiatic Russia
Weimar was the cultural and intellectual capital of Germany in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, the home of poets Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller. This 1822 engraved map by the Weimar Geographic Institute shows provincial boundaries, population centers, and the different nationalities of Siberia. Ethnic Germans from the Baltic region in the service of the tsarist government played prominent roles in the exploration of Siberia in the 18th century and the region remained an object of fascination to many Germans.
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National Library of Russia
General Map of Asiatic Russia: Showing an Up-to-Date Division into Provinces and Regions, Maritime Administration of the Maritime Region, and the Routes of Russian Seafarers
This Russian map of Siberia shows the borders of regions and districts, population centers, roads, fortresses, redoubts, outposts, guard posts, factories, mines, and ruins. It also indicates the territories of the various nationalities of Siberia and shows in fine detail the routes taken by the major Russian explorers--Bering, Billings, Kruzenshtern, Golovin, Sarychev, Gall--on their expeditions to the North Pacific and Alaska. The map was produced by the Corps of Military Topographers which, under a government regulation of 1822, was attached to the General Staff and the Military Topographical Depot “to ...
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National Library of Russia