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Gaetano Ciniselli
Italian-born Gaetano Ciniselli (1815−81) was the head of a large circus family, a circus equestrian, and a horse trainer who was taught by the famous French riding master François Baucher (1796−1873). He achieved fame throughout Europe and in 1877 founded and became director of the Ciniselli Circus in Saint Petersburg, which was housed in the first stone structure in Russia purpose-built for circus. He brought to the Saint Petersburg public all of the best performers and pantomimes of Europe. This portrait of Ciniselli was taken by Charles Bergamasco ...
Contributed by
The Bolshoi St. Petersburg State Circus - Museum of Circus Art
Ciniselli Circus Water Pantomime
This poster by an unknown artist is devoted to the Ciniselli Circus water pantomime (probably The Four Elements). Produced in Berlin by the firm Dinse & Eckert, the picture is a colored lithograph with the letters written in gold. The water pantomime was performed for the first time in Russia in 1892. In The Four Elements, water rushed down in a cascade and fountains gushed out in different places of the arena. Deer, elephants, and horses with riders swam in the arena lake. Pantomime, an art form in which the story ...
Contributed by
The Bolshoi St. Petersburg State Circus - Museum of Circus Art
Rules of Conduct for the Ciniselli Circus
This placard contains the rules of conduct for the Ciniselli Circus in Saint Petersburg set by the management. Issued on January 10, 1891, the rules were published in two languages: French and German. The choice of languages, combined with circus programs of the period, demonstrates that nearly all the performers in the circus came from abroad. The 18 points regulated the lives of circus personnel. Performers and staff were required to attend all rehearsals and to take care of their equipment and costumes; everyone was required to be ready at ...
Contributed by
The Bolshoi St. Petersburg State Circus - Museum of Circus Art
Emperor Alexander II with the Children: Sergei and Maria
This photograph, taken in 1860 or 1861, shows Tsar Alexander II (1818−81, ruled 1855−81), with two of his eight children: Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna (born 1853) and Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich (born 1857). Alexander is seated in a chair, three-quarters to his left, wearing a military uniform. The grand duchess is leaning on her father’s right knee, facing forward; the grand duke is sitting on his father’s left leg.  Alexander was most respected for his emancipation of the serfs in 1861, and his domestic reforms included ...
Contributed by
Boris Yeltsin Presidential Library
Family of Emperor Alexander III
This photograph of the family of Tsar Alexander III (1845−94) was taken about a year before his death from nephritis. Also shown in the photo are Empress Maria Fedorovna (1866−1928), Grand Duke Nicholas Alexandrovich (1868−1918), Grand Duke George Alexandrovich (1871−99), Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna (1875−1960), Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna (1882−1918), and Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovich (1878−1918). Empress Maria Fedorovna, also called Princess Dagmar, fled Russia in 1919 with other members of the Romanov family aboard the British battleship HMS Marlborough. She settled and ...
Contributed by
Boris Yeltsin Presidential Library
A Map of Saint Petersburg Province and County
The complete title of this 1792 watercolor manuscript map is “A map of Saint Petersburg province and county including parts of other counties belonging to the province, such as Shlisselburg, Sofeisk, Оranienbaum and Rozhdestveno with Saint Petersburg as the administrative center from which it radiates for 40 versts.” The text goes on to explain that part “of this province, previously called Ingria, was conquered from Sweden in 1702 and according to the Treaty of Nystad, in 1721 Ingria was formally ceded to Russia by Sweden. On May 16, 1703 Saint ...
Contributed by
Boris Yeltsin Presidential Library
Cathedral of SS, Peter and Paul, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul, the patron saints of St. Petersburg, is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Construction of a wooden church on the site of the cathedral began in 1703, one month after the city of St. Petersburg was officially founded. The church was consecrated on April 1, 1704. The stone cathedral was built between 1712 and 1733, under the direction of the Swiss-Italian ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Winter Palace Place and Alexander's Column, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Winter Palace and Alexander’s Column in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Winter Palace was built between 1754 and 1762 for Empress Elizabeth, the daughter of Peter the Great (1672-1725), and served as the residence of the Russian tsars from the 1760s until the revolution of 1917. The Baroque-style building measures more than 17,000 square meters and is distinguished by its ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Newsky, (i.e., Nevskii), Prospekt and the Admiralty, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Nevsky Prospect and the Admiralty in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In his novel, Nevsky Prospect, Gogol wrote of the street, “Step into it, and you step into a fairground.” Named for Alexander Nevsky (1220–63), the 13th-century hero who led Russian armies to victory over German and Swedish invaders, Nevsky Prospekt was planned by Peter the Great (1672-1725) and designed by the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Peter the Great Place, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of Peter the Great Place in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The statue, which stands beside the Neva River, just before St. Isaac's Cathedral (visible in the background), is famous as the “Bronze Horseman” of Alexander Pushkin's narrative poem of 1833. The statue was commissioned by Catherine II (1762–96) to honor Peter I. A model was made by French sculptor Etienne Maurice ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Kasan Cathedral, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Kazan Cathedral, also known as the Cathedral of Our Lady of Kazan, in St. Petersburg, is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The cathedral takes its name from Our Lady of Kazan, the most venerated icon of the Russian Orthodox Church, and was designed by the Russian architect Andrey Voronikhin (1759–1814). According to Baedeker’s Russia with Teheran, Port Arthur, and Peking (1914), the cathedral is ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Isaac Cathedral from Alexander's Garden, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of St. Isaac’s Cathedral in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Named after St. Isaac, the presumed patron saint of Peter the Great (1672-1725), the cathedral was commissioned by Alexander I (1777–1825) and was built between 1819 and 1858 under the direction of the French architect Richard de Montferrand (1786–1858). It is the largest cathedral in Russia. According to Baedeker’s Russia with ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Monument of Catherine II, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Catherine II monument in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Empress Catherine II, also known as Catherine the Great, ruled Russia from 1762 to 1796. She was much admired, particularly by the Russian nobility, who benefited from the reforms she instituted. The monument, erected in 1873, stands in a square just off of St. Petersburg’s main thoroughfare, Nevsky Prospekt. It was designed by ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Peterhof from Castle, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the palace of Peterhof in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Based on a design by the French architect Alexandre Jean-Baptiste LeBlond (1679–1719), Peterhof is regarded as the Russian Versailles. It was built by Peter the Great (1672–1725) as a summer residence. Located on the shore of the Neva Bay (or Gulf of Kronstadt), the palace offers a view of Kronstadt, the city ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Etruscan Vases in the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Detail of Church of the Resurrection on the Blood
The Church of the Resurrection (Savior on Spilled Blood) in Saint Petersburg was built on the site of the assassination in March 13, 1881, of Tsar Alexander II, known as the “Tsar Liberator” for his emancipation of the serfs in 1861. The idea for this memorial arose in 1883 on the initiative of Archimandrite Ignatii (Malyshev), with a plan by the architect Alfred Parland. Because of extensive use of decorative arts (including the creation of huge mosaics) on both the interior and exterior, the church was not completed until 1907 ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Etruscan Vases in the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg
Shown here from behind is an Etruscan vase in the form of a sphinx as portrayed in Greek art: the head of a woman on the body of a lion, with the wings of a giant bird. The item was photograped in the Hermitage Museum, but the date of this photograph is not known. The photographer lived in Saint Petersburg and could have been taken it at any point during his professional career in that city, from 1901 until 1918. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863 ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Etruscan Vases in the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg
Produced under the influence of Greek art from the seventh to the fourth ceturies BCE, Etruscan vases occupied one of the most magnificent halls in the New Hermitage, the Hall of Graeco-Etruscan Vases. The bulk of the collection, which numbers some 1,300 items, was purchased in Rome in 1834 and originally displayed at the Imperial Academy of the Arts. With the completion of the New Hermitage in 1851, the collection was transferred to a temple-like setting at the end of the west enfilade. Shown here is a vase in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Etruscan Vases in the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg
Produced under the influence of Greek art from the seventy to the fourth ceturies BCE, Etruscan vases occupied one of the most magnificent halls in the New Hermitage, the Hall of Graeco-Etruscan Vases. The bulk of the collection, which numbers some 1,300 items, was purchased in Rome in 1834 and originally displayed at the Imperial Academy of the Arts. With the completion of the New Hermitage in 1851, the collection was transferred to a temple-like setting at the end of the west enfilade. Shown in this side view is ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Etruscan Vases in the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg
Produced under the influence of Greek art from the seventh to the fourth centuries BCE, richly colored Etruscan vases occupied one of the most magnificent halls in the New Hermitage, the Hall of Graeco-Etruscan Vases. With the completion of the New Hermitage in 1851, the collection was transferred from the Imperial Academy of the Arts to a temple-like setting at the end of the west enfilade. Seen here is the head and bust of a Maenad, one of the ecstatic female followers of Bacchus, the god of wine. The bust ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
General Kuropatkin and His Staff Joyfully Leaving Saint Petersburg for the Front
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress