9 results in English
Map of the Investigation of the Asiatic Part of the USSR for Hydrogeological Purposes in 1932
This map was created for use by a Soviet government research institute. By means of the color coding, it shows regions in Siberia where hydrogeological investigations had been carried out and divides those regions into three categories: detailed and special hydrogeological investigations from prospectors' experience…on a scale of two versts per inch; general hydrogeological investigations…more than two versts per inch; and geological, hydrogeological, soil, and other investigations eliciting the presence of underground water. The white areas, occupying by far the largest part of the map, indicate where neither ...
Map of Agricultural Areas of the Siberian Region
This Soviet-era map shows the agricultural areas of Siberia, district borders, railroads, rivers, lakes, district centers, and cities. Although much of Siberia is unsuited for farming, good conditions prevail in the forest steppe region of southwestern Siberia and in parts of southern Siberia. Peasants who migrated from European Russia in the 19th century had to adjust to Siberian conditions, learning, for example, to plant their crops neither too low in the wet taiga (which risked rot) nor too high on open lands (which risked frost). By the late 19th century ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
Map of the Western Part of Asiatic Russia as of 1807 and Notes About Siberia by a Member of the Privy Council of Senator M. Kornilov
This map depicts the western part of Asiatic Russia and includes the territory stretching from Ekaterinburg to Irkutsk (approximately 3,500 kilometers). Besides rivers, mountains, and cities, it shows settlements of different ethnic groups: Tungus, Ostyak, Kalmyk, and many others. The map incorporates remarks made by Alexei Kornilov, a governor of Irkutsk Province, then Tobol'sk Province, and later a senator. His notes, compiled in 1807, include information about the ethnic diversity of Irkutsk and Tobol'sk provinces, means of transportation, systems of government, and other topics. The right side ...
We Live and Work According to Lenin: Atlas of the Novosibirsk Region
The Communist Party of the Soviet Union drew its legitimacy from the life and work of Vladimir I. Lenin, the leading figure of the Russian Revolution and the founder of the Soviet state. This late Soviet-era atlas of the Siberian region of Novosibirsk contains, in addition to its 32 maps, sections on V. I. Lenin and Siberia, the establishment of Soviet power in Novosibirsk, and the participation of the region in the Great Patriotic War (World War II), as well as descriptions of the industrial, agricultural, educational, and cultural achievements ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
Asiatic Siberia. Map of the Siberia Region
This Soviet-era map shows population centers, spas, administrative borders, communication routes, piers, ports, mountains and elevated points, the height and depth (in meters) of natural features, rivers, lakes, swamps, mineral fields, mines, excavations, and newly-constructed factories. The colors on the inset maps in the upper and lower right denote the sea, tundra, and forested regions.
Ilimka Wharf, Where Twenty-Fathom Vessels Are Built. Shoals at Ilimka
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Village of Ilimka
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of Asiatic Russia
Weimar was the cultural and intellectual capital of Germany in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, the home of poets Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller. This 1822 engraved map by the Weimar Geographic Institute shows provincial boundaries, population centers, and the different nationalities of Siberia. Ethnic Germans from the Baltic region in the service of the tsarist government played prominent roles in the exploration of Siberia in the 18th century and the region remained an object of fascination to many Germans.
General Map of Asiatic Russia: Showing an Up-to-Date Division into Provinces and Regions, Maritime Administration of the Maritime Region, and the Routes of Russian Seafarers
This Russian map of Siberia shows the borders of regions and districts, population centers, roads, fortresses, redoubts, outposts, guard posts, factories, mines, and ruins. It also indicates the territories of the various nationalities of Siberia and shows in fine detail the routes taken by the major Russian explorers--Bering, Billings, Kruzenshtern, Golovin, Sarychev, Gall--on their expeditions to the North Pacific and Alaska. The map was produced by the Corps of Military Topographers which, under a government regulation of 1822, was attached to the General Staff and the Military Topographical Depot “to ...