9 results
Map of Agricultural Areas of the Siberian Region
This Soviet-era map shows the agricultural areas of Siberia, district borders, railroads, rivers, lakes, district centers, and cities. Although much of Siberia is unsuited for farming, good conditions prevail in the forest steppe region of southwestern Siberia and in parts of southern Siberia. Peasants who migrated from European Russia in the 19th century had to adjust to Siberian conditions, learning, for example, to plant their crops neither too low in the wet taiga (which risked rot) nor too high on open lands (which risked frost). By the late 19th century ...
Contributed by
Russian State Library
Asiatic Siberia. Map of the Siberia Region
This Soviet-era map shows population centers, spas, administrative borders, communication routes, piers, ports, mountains and elevated points, the height and depth (in meters) of natural features, rivers, lakes, swamps, mineral fields, mines, excavations, and newly-constructed factories. The colors on the inset maps in the upper and lower right denote the sea, tundra, and forested regions.
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Enisei Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Enisei Province, which is located in central Siberia and takes its name from the Enisei River, one of the longest rivers in Asia. The map marks ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Along the Russian Arctic Regions: Adolf Nordenskiöld's Voyage around Europe and Asia in 1878–80
This illustrated book by Eduard Andreevich Granstrem (1843–1918), a Russian writer of popular histories for young people, recounts the first successful navigation of the Northeast Passage, accomplished by the Finnish-born geographer and Arctic explorer Nils Adolf Erik Nordenskiöld (1832–1901) on the steamship Vega in 1878–79. A possible northern passage between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans had been discussed since the early 16th century, but Nordenskiöld was the first navigator to travel the entire water route along the northern coast of Europe and Asia. Accompanied by three other ...
Contributed by
Boris Yeltsin Presidential Library
Map of Asiatic Russia
Weimar was the cultural and intellectual capital of Germany in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, the home of poets Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller. This 1822 engraved map by the Weimar Geographic Institute shows provincial boundaries, population centers, and the different nationalities of Siberia. Ethnic Germans from the Baltic region in the service of the tsarist government played prominent roles in the exploration of Siberia in the 18th century and the region remained an object of fascination to many Germans.
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Letter on Birch Bark from Siberia by Rasma Kraukle, May 19, 1945
On August 5, 1940, the independent country of Latvia was forcibly incorporated into the Soviet Union, after having been occupied by the Red Army in June of that year. Estonia and Lithuania suffered a similar fate. Thousands of Latvians were arrested for having anti-Soviet views, taking part in resistance movements, being farmers, belonging to political parties, or refusing to join a collective farm.  Many were deported to Siberia. People who were in prisons, concentration camps, or settlements in Siberia wrote letters to friends and relatives on birch bark, which was ...
Contributed by
National Library of Latvia
Letter on Birch Bark from Siberia by Gražina Gaidene, May 15, 1949
On August 5, 1940, the independent country of Latvia was forcibly incorporated into the Soviet Union, after having been occupied by the Red Army in June of that year. Estonia and Lithuania suffered a similar fate. Thousands of Latvians were arrested for having anti-Soviet views, taking part in resistance movements, being farmers, belonging to political parties, or refusing to join a collective farm. Many were deported to Siberia. People who were in prisons, concentration camps, or settlements in Siberia wrote letters to friends and relatives in Latvia on birch bark ...
Contributed by
National Library of Latvia
Enisei Province
This card is one of a souvenir set of 82 illustrated cards–one for each province of the Russian Empire as it existed in 1856. Each card presents an overview of a particular province’s culture, history, economy, and geography. The front of the card depicts such distinguishing features as rivers, mountains, major cities, and chief industries. The back of each card contains a map of the province, the provincial seal, information about the population, and a picture of the local costume of the inhabitants.
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
General Map of Asiatic Russia: Showing an Up-to-Date Division into Provinces and Regions, Maritime Administration of the Maritime Region, and the Routes of Russian Seafarers
This Russian map of Siberia shows the borders of regions and districts, population centers, roads, fortresses, redoubts, outposts, guard posts, factories, mines, and ruins. It also indicates the territories of the various nationalities of Siberia and shows in fine detail the routes taken by the major Russian explorers--Bering, Billings, Kruzenshtern, Golovin, Sarychev, Gall--on their expeditions to the North Pacific and Alaska. The map was produced by the Corps of Military Topographers which, under a government regulation of 1822, was attached to the General Staff and the Military Topographical Depot “to ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia