141 results in English
Church of the Dormition (1774), South Facade, Kondopoga, Russia
This south view of the Church of the Dormition in Kondopoga (Karelia) was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on an inlet of Lake Onega, Kondopoga existed as a settlement by the late 15th century. In the mid-18th century its significance increased with the discovery in two nearby villages of rich sources of marble, used for the construction of some of Saint Petersburg's most notable buildings. Deposits ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Dormition (1774), Southeast View, Kondopoga, Russia
This southeast view of the Church of the Dormition in Kondopoga (Karelia) was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on an inlet of Lake Onega (visible here), Kondopoga existed as a settlement by the late 15th century. In the mid-18th century its significance increased with the discovery in two nearby villages of sources of marble, used for the construction of some of Saint Petersburg's most notable buildings ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Transfiguration (1714), West Facade, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Church of the Transfiguration of the Savior on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1991 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches. The site’s dominant feature is the Church of the Transfiguration of ...
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Church of the Transfiguration (1714), Southwest View, Cupolas with Aspen, Kizhi Island, Russia
This view of cupolas at the top of the Church of the Transfiguration of the Savior on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1991 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches. The site’s dominant feature is the Church ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Dormition (1774), East Facade, Detail, Kondopoga, Russia
This detailed view of the east facade of the Church of the Dormition in Kondopoga (Karelia) was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on an inlet of Lake Onega, Kondopoga existed as a settlement by the late 15th century. In the mid-18th century its significance increased with the discovery in two nearby villages of sources of marble, used for the construction of some of Saint Petersburg's notable ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Transfiguration (1714), West View, Evening, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Church of the Transfiguration of the Savior on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches and a bell tower. In 1990, this ensemble was added to the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Intercession (1764), Southwest View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This southwest view of the Church of the Intercession of the Mother of God on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two churches, one dedicated to the Transfiguration and the other to the Intercession ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Pogost Ensemble, Church of the Transfiguration (1714), and Bell Tower (19th Century), Northwest View, Evening, Kizhi Island, Russia
This northwest view of the main church ensemble on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches. In 1990, this ensemble was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List. The site’s dominant ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Pogost Ensemble, Church of the Intercession (1764) (Right); with Bell Tower (19th Century); and Church of the Transfiguration (1714), South View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This south view of the main church ensemble on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches. In 1990, this ensemble was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List. The site’s dominant ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Transfiguration (1714), West View, Sunset, Kizhi Island, Russia
This spectacular west view of the Church of the Transfiguration of the Savior on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1991 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches and a bell tower. In 1990, this ensemble was added to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Intercession (1764), Icon Screen, Kizhi Island, Russia
This interior view of the Church of the Intercession of the Mother of God on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing a bell tower and two wooden churches, one dedicated to the Transfiguration and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Intercession (1764), Icon Screen, Kizhi Island, Russia
This interior view of the Church of the Intercession of the Mother of God on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches, one dedicated to the Transfiguration (1714) and the other to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel of Archangel Michael, from Lelikozero Village (Late 18th Century), West View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Chapel of Archangel Michael on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1991 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. The Chapel of Archangel Michael, built at the end of the 18th century, originally was located at ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel of the Dormition (Late 17th Century?), West View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Chapel of the Dormition at the village of Vasil'evo on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. The Chapel of the Dormition, built at the end of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel of the Miraculous Image of Christ, from Vigovo Village (Late 17th Century?), West View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Chapel of the Miraculous Image of the Savior (Spas Nerukotvornyi) on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. The Chapel of the Miraculous Image of the Savior dates from ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Oshevnev House, from Oshevnevo Village (1876), Kizhi Island, Russia
This southwest view of the Oshevnev house on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches. In 1990, this ensemble was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List. The site’s dominant feature ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Three Prelates, from Kavgora Village (Late 18th Century), Southwest View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This southwest view of the Chapel of the Three Prelates on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. Originally built in the village of Kavgora (Kondopoga District), the Chapel of the Three Prelates (Trëkh ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sergin House, from Munozero Village (1880s), Kizhi Island, Russia
This southwest view of the Sergin house on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1988 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches. In 1990, this ensemble was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List. Originally located in the village ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Resurrection of Lazarus, from Murom Monastery (Karelia, Late 14th Century?), Northeast View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This northeast view of the Church of the Resurrection of Lazarus on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1988 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. The miniature Church of the Resurrection of Lazarus was originally built at the Murom-Dormition Monastery ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Dormition (1711-1717), West Facade, Kem', Russia
This west view of the Cathedral of the Dormition in Kem' (Karelia) was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the southwest shore of the White Sea, Kem’ was not only an important settlement in its own right, but also served as a gateway to the Solovetskii Islands. Built in 1711-17, the Cathedral of the Dormition is one of the most interesting wooden structures in Russian architecture—and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Dormition (1711-1717), North Chapel of Saints Zosima and Savvatii, Northeast View, Kem', Russia
This northeast view of the Cathedral of the Dormition in Kem' (Karelia) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the southwest shore of the White Sea, the Kem’ region belonged to the medieval trading center of Novgorod until the end of the 15th century. In the 16th century, Kem’ became an important outpost on Muscovy’s northwest flank and served as a gateway to the Solovetskii Islands ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Dormition (1711-1717), West Facade, Kem', Russia
This west view of the Cathedral of the Dormition in Kem' (Karelia) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the southwest shore of the White Sea, Kem’ was not only an important settlement in its own right, but also served as a gateway to the Solovetskii Islands. Built in 1711-17, the Cathedral of the Dormition is one of the most interesting wooden structures in Russian architecture—and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Dormition (1711-1717), East View, Kem', Russia
This east view of the Cathedral of the Dormition in Kem' (Karelia) was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the southwest shore of the White Sea, Kem’ was not only an important settlement in its own right, but also served as a gateway to the Solovetskii Islands. Built in 1711-17, the Cathedral of the Dormition is one of the most interesting wooden structures in Russian architecture—and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Olonetsk Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Olonetsk Province, located in the northwestern part of the empire. The province borders Finland across Lake Ladoga in the west, and also contains many other lakes ...
Ladva Station on the Murmansk Railroad. Unevenness of the Railway
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Pogost Ensemble, Church of the Transfiguration (1714) (Left); Bell Tower (19th Century); Church of the Intercession (1764), West View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the main church ensemble on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches and a bell tower. The site’s dominant feature is the Church of the Transfiguration of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
City of Petrozavodsk. General View from Onega Lake
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, then called Petrograd. Among the towns in this northern area along the route was Petrozavodsk, founded in September 1703, just four months after Saint Petersburg. Tsar Peter I (the Great) needed an additional iron works to supply his military, and his energetic associate Alexander Menshikov discovered an appropriate site where the Shuya River enters Lake Onega. The name of the settlement soon evolved to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral in Petrozavodsk
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, then called Petrograd. Among the towns in this northern area along the route was Petrozavodsk, founded in September 1703, just four months after Saint Petersburg. Seen here is the southwest view of the Cathedral of the Descent of the Holy Spirit, constructed from 1860 to 1872. The Russo-Byzantine design, with five domes, was created by the renowned Petersburg architect Konstantin Thon. Implementation of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Petrozavodsk. Chapel Built by Peter the Great
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, Petrograd. Among the towns in this northern area along the route was Petrozavodsk, founded in September 1703, just four months after Saint Petersburg. Seen here is the southwest view of the Church of Saints Peter and Paul, commissioned by Tsar Peter I most likely in 1703. The structure, referred to in some sources as a cathedral, was built of logs with subsequent plank siding ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Place Where the Palace of Peter the Great Stood in the Petrozavodsk Park
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, then called Petrograd. Among the towns in this northern area along the route was Petrozavodsk (“Peter’s factory”), founded in September 1703, just four months after Saint Petersburg. Tsar Peter I (the Great) needed an additional iron works to supply his military, and his associate Alexander Menshikov discovered an appropriate site where the Shuya River enters Lake Onega. A plaque attached to a post ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church in Petrozavodsk
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, then called Petrograd. Among the towns in this northern area along the route was Petrozavodsk (“Peter’s factory”). Seen here from the southwest is the Cathedral of the Resurrection, built in 1800 and originally dedicated to the Descent of the Holy Spirit. (With the completion of a much larger Cathedral of the Holy Spirit in 1872, this church was rededicated to the Resurrection.) Although ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Petrozavodsk. General View of the Factory
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, then called Petrograd. Among the towns in this northern area along the route was Petrozavodsk (“Peter’s factory”), founded in September 1703, just four months after Saint Petersburg. Tsar Peter I (the Great) needed an additional iron works to supply his military, and his associate Alexander Menshikov discovered an appropriate site where the Shuya River enters Lake Onega. The works were subsequently renamed the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Petrozavodsk Station on the Olonetsk Railroad
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, Petrograd. The caption for this image mistakenly identifies this structure as the Petrozavodsk station, which was along the route. In fact, it is one of the depot buildings at the Lodeinoe Pole station. Located on the Svir River and now a part of Leningrad oblast, Lodeinoe Pole was at the time of this photograph a part of Olenets Province. The Olenets Railway was a ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Petrozavodsk. General View from the Railroad
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, Petrograd. Among the towns in this northern area along the route was Petrozavodsk (“Peter’s factory”), founded in September 1703, just four months after Saint Petersburg. This panoramic view toward the northeast, taken from Golikovka Station, includes the white churches and administrative buildings of the central part of town, as well as the area of wooden houses to the southwest of the Alexandrovsky Factory ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Curve, near the Petrozavodsk Station
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, then called Petrograd. Although not completed in time to have a major impact on Russia’s efforts in the First World War, the northern part of the Murmansk Railroad (renamed the Kirov Railroad in 1935) was to prove immensely significant as a link for Lend-Lease shipments during World War II. Shown here is a curved grade cut through the rocky ground north of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Approach to the Railroad Bridge over the Lososinka River near the Petrozavodsk Station on the Murmansk Railway
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is track construction leading north to the bridge over the Lososinka River near the Petrozavodsk Station. This photograph reveals significant challenges in stabilizing the track bed over marshy terrain with uneven bedrock. The 25-kilometer Lososinka originates at Lososinskoe Lake and flows through Petrozavodsk, where it empties into Lake ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Same Bridge from the Side. Railroad Bridge over the Lososinka River, Petrozavodsk
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is construction on the bridge over the Lososinka River near the Petrozavodsk Station. The 25-kilometer Lososinka originates at Lososinskoe Lake and flows through Petrozavodsk, where it empties into Lake Ladoga. Log scaffolding supports the track and structural work on the bridge, which is faced with limestone blocks. This ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railroad Bridge on the Murmansk Railway
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is the log house of a railway post near a road crossing in the vicinity of Petrozavodsk (in Karelia). A woman stands in front of a shed, next to which are log sections to be cut for firewood. The track takes a sharp curve (on right). A signal ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Petrozavodsk Station on the Murmansk Railway
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is the log house of a railway post near a road crossing in the vicinity of Petrozavodsk (in Karelia). A woman stands in front of a shed, next to which are log sections to be cut for firewood. The track takes a sharp curve (on right). A signal ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Petrozavodsk. General View from the Station on the Murmansk Railway
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This stunning view of Petrozavodsk (now capital of Karelia) was taken from the railroad embankment to the west of the town. On the left is the wooden Church of the Trinity and the Church of the Elevation of the Cross, consecrated in 1852 and the only church shown here that ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
On the Handcar outside Petrozavodsk on the Murmansk Railway
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View of the Petrozavodsk Station on the Olenetsk Railroad
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here is Golikovka Junction at Petrozavodsk (now capital of Karelia). The junction served as the boundary for the Olenets and Murmansk Railways. A line of flatbed cars extends along a siding whose hastily-laid track rises and dips on the soft ground. Barely visible to the left of the locomotive ...
Contributed by Library of Congress