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Map of Baikal, a Sea, a Lake, or an Angara Gap, Located in the Irkutsk Province with All the Neighboring [Territory], Whose Mathematical Measurements were Completed and it Became Fully Known in 1806
Lake Baikal and the region around it were extensively explored by Russian expeditions in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This map shows in great detail the shoreline of the lake and the network of rivers flowing into and out of Baikal. The title of the map is shown in a cartouche. Below the title is a single-headed eagle, holding in its talons the coat of arms of Irkutsk Province. The illustration at the lower left is a view of Nikolaevsk Pier, located at the point where the Angara ...
Contributed by
Russian State Library
Church of the Elevation of the Cross (1747-58), South View, Irkutsk, Russia
This southeast view of the Church of the Elevation of the Cross in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Built in stages from 1747 to 1760 on the Hill of the Cross, the church originally bore the name of its first main altar, dedicated to the Trinity, with a secondary altar dedicated to the Elevation of the Cross. The elongated form combines traditional 17th-century ...
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Library of Congress
Church of the Elevation of the Cross (1747-58), Southeast Corner, Irkutsk, Russia
This southeast view of the main structure of the Church of the Elevation of the Cross in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Built in stages from 1747 to 1760 on the Hill of the Cross, the church originally bore the name of its first altar, dedicated to the Trinity, with a secondary altar dedicated to the Elevation of the Cross. The primary altar ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of the Savior (1706-10), Southwest View, Irkutsk, Russia
This photograph of the Church of the Miraculous Icon of the Savior (Spas Nerukotvornyi) in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. From the time of its first log forts in the 1660s, Irkutsk was destined to be the administrative and commercial center of eastern Siberia. In 1700, Irkutsk became the third Siberian city capable of producing bricks on a large scale. In 1706-10, master ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Log Fort Tower (Late 17th Century), Bel'sk, Russia
This photograph of the surviving log tower at the Bel'sk fort (Irkutsk territory, eastern Siberia) was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. From the middle of the 17th century to the 19th century, Russian settlements in the vast Irkutsk territory were built almost entirely of logs. Remarkably, a few of these log structures from the 17th century have survived. Among them is this watch tower from the fort ...
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Library of Congress
Church of the Savior (1706-10), East View, Irkutsk, Russia
This photograph of the Church of the Miraculous Icon of the Savior (Spas Nerukotvornyi) in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. From the time of its first log forts in the 1660s, Irkutsk was destined to be the administrative and commercial center of eastern Siberia. In 1700, Irkutsk became the third Siberian city capable of producing bricks on a large scale. Shortly thereafter, in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Governor-General's Residence (1814-21). Built by the Merchant M. V. Sibiriakov, the Building Now Serves as Part of Irkutsk State University, Irkutsk, Russia.
This photograph of the former Sibiriakov Mansion in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. From the time of its first log forts in the 1660s, Irkutsk was destined to be the administrative and commercial center of eastern Siberia. In 1700, Irkutsk became the third Siberian city capable of producing bricks on a large scale. This grand residence, with a Corinthian portico, was built in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Irkutsk Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Irkutsk Province, located in eastern Siberia and bordered by China (present-day Mongolia) to the south. Irkutsk, situated just west of Lake Baikal, was the administrative center ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Irkutsk Province
This card is one of a souvenir set of 82 illustrated cards–one for each province of the Russian Empire as it existed in 1856. Each card presents an overview of a particular province’s culture, history, economy, and geography. The front of the card depicts such distinguishing features as rivers, mountains, major cities, and chief industries. The back of each card contains a map of the province, the provincial seal, information about the population, and a picture of the local costume of the inhabitants.
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
General Map of Irkutsk Province, Self-Compiled in Irkutsk, Yakutsk, and Udinsk Provinces
This multi-colored, hand-colored map of eastern Siberia shows the state of geographic knowledge at the beginning of the last quarter of the 18th century. The geographic grid and the mapping of the rivers are well-executed. Sakhalin Island is shown, but is poorly mapped. The work is by Johann Treskot (1721-86), a cartographer at the Geographical Department of the Academy of Sciences in Saint Petersburg, who compiled many of the maps published by the academy from the 1740s to the 1780s.
Contributed by
Russian State Library
Geognostic Map of the Localities of Irkutsk, Verkholensk, and Balagansk Districts
The first geological (geognostic) maps in Russia were produced in the 1850s. This map of the Irkutsk region was published by the Siberian Department of the Imperial Russian Geographic Society under the leadership of Academician F.B. Schmidt. It shows the location of mines and minerals, caves, gaps, salt deposits, springs, landslides, and patterns of freezing on Lake Baikal. The colors denote different types of rock.
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Russian State Library
Geological Map of the Lena Gold Fields
This map from 1901 depicts a gold mining area in eastern Siberia covering 12 versts (circa 11 kilometers) from north to south and 6 versts (circa 6.5 kilometers) from east to west. The area is located between the Lena and Vitim rivers in the Patom Highland, northwest of Lake Baikal. The map, which is in Russian and French, shows rivers, numerous gold mines, mountains, and highlands. The Vitim River, a large tributary of the Lena, one of the major rivers of Russia, is shown at the bottom of the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia