Fathers of the Solovetsky Monastery and Their Sufferings
This manuscript was made around 1800 by an often-persecuted group of Russian Christians, the Old Believers. Because books were frequently confiscated from this group and its members were denied the use of printing presses, they continued to write important books such as this one by hand. This text chronicles and illustrates the story of a group of monks at the Solovetsky Monastery who opposed the controversial reforms introduced by Nikon (Patriarch of Moscow, 1652−58) and who endured a siege of eight years (1668−76) before they were finally betrayed ...
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Walters Art Museum
Monastery, Canal (19th Century), Solovetskii Island, Russia
This photograph of a canal on Large Solovetskii Island was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated in the southwestern part of the White Sea, the island and its archipelago are the site of the Transfiguration-Solovetskii Monastery, one of the most revered monastic institutions in Russia. Founded as early as 1429 by the monk Savvatii, the monastery experienced its greatest development in the second half of the 16th century ...
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Monastery, Cathedral of the Transfiguration of the Savior (1558-1566), Northwest View with Gallery (1602), and Church of St. Nicholas (1832-1834) Solovetskii Island, Russia
This photograph of the central ensemble of the Transfiguration-Solovetskii Monastery was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on Large Solovetskii Island, part of an archipelago in the White Sea, the monastery was founded as early as 1429 by the monk Savvatii. Following his death in 1435, the enterprise was revived by the monk Zosima in 1436. After decades of tenuous existence, the remote monastery greatly expanded in the ...
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Corner Tower of the Trinity Cathedral in the Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
View of the Solovetskii Monastery from the Inn. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the monumental Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. This photograph, showing the monastery’s west wall, was taken from a large hotel next to the pier at the Harbor of Blessedness. The massive walls of the monastery were constructed primarily of granite boulders, and were ...
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Library of Congress
View of the Solovetskii Monastery from Land. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. This view of the monastery’s east wall was taken from the northeast. The massive walls of the monastery were constructed primarily of granite boulders, and were built between 1582 and 1621. In the foreground, with a small ...
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Library of Congress
Monastery's Boat. A Study. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here is a large rigged sailing vessel that belonged to the Transfiguration Monastery, which was located near the rail route, on Great Solovetskii Island. Founded in 1436, by the 16th century the monastery had become one of the most important spiritual centers in Russia, despite its location on a ...
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Library of Congress
Entrance into Trinity Cathedral in the Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. Seen here is the main entrance to the monastery, the Holy Gate. The gate structure was built into the western part of the massive walls of the monastery, which were constructed primarily of granite boulders and were built ...
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Library of Congress
Model of the Boat on Which Peter the Great Visited Solovetskii Monastery in 1694. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. Shown here is a model of the three-masted ship Saint Peter, suspended from the brick vault of an entrance passage to the monastery. At the command of Peter I, the ship was built in 1693 at the Solombala ...
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Library of Congress
Solovetskii Monastery from the Lake. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. This view shows the Saint Nicholas Tower and gate, located at the northeast corner of the monastery. The massive walls of the monastery were constructed primarily of granite boulders, and were built between 1582 and 1621, with the ...
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Library of Congress
Trinity Cathedral and the Electric Station. A Side View. Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. Seen here is the brick building of the electric station for the monastery, completed in 1912 and equipped by the Saint Petersburg affiliate of the Siemens Company. Behind the electric station is the south wall of the monastery ...
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Library of Congress
Trinity Cathedral. Side View. Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Island
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. Shown here is the Tsar Bell Tower, demolished during the Soviet period. More a pavilion than a bell tower, it was built to house the large “Good Tidings” bell presented to the monastery in 1860 by Tsar Alexander ...
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Library of Congress
Canal in Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. The main island was dotted with dozens of lakes, and ameliorative work for drainage and transportation began as early as the 16th century. Shown here is a boat canal begun in the early 20th century between Lake Valdai ...
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Library of Congress
Canal in Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. The main island was dotted with dozens of lakes, and ameliorative work for drainage and transportation began as early as the 16th century. Shown here is a boat canal under construction between Lake Valdai and Lake Kotlovannoe (the ...
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Library of Congress
Canal in Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. The main island was dotted with dozens of lakes, and ameliorative work for drainage and transportation began as early as the 16th century. Shown here is a boat canal under construction between Lake Valdai and Lake Kotlovannoe (the ...
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Library of Congress
Peter's Chapel in the Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. Seen here is the Chapel of Saint Savvatii (misidentified in the caption) at the Savvatii skete (monastic retreat) on Great Solovetskii Island. This site was sacred because of its association with a founder of the monastery, the venerable ...
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Library of Congress
Aleksandr Nevskii Chapel on the Hill in the Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
This photograph was taken near the historic area of the Solovetskii-Transfiguration Monastery, located on the Solovetskii Archipelago in the southwestern part of the White Sea. The caption erroneously identifies the church on the distant hill as Saint Alexander Nevskii Chapel. It is in fact the Church of the Ascension on Sekirnaia Hill, one of the most renowned skete (monastic retreats) on the islands. The church was built in 1860–62 with a single cupola. Because of the church’s elevated position, the cupola was surmounted with a powerful lantern that ...
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View of the Makarev Hermitage from the Chapel. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. Seen in this view northeast from Sekira (Poleax) Hill (the highest point on the island) is the Saint Savvatii skete, or monastic retreat (misidentified in the caption as the Makarev Hermitage). This site was sacred because of its ...
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Library of Congress
Near the Makarev Hermitage. A Study. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. Shown here is a building where fat was rendered. The walls were constructed of granite boulders on a part of the island known as Seldianyi (Herring). Cape seals were the primary source for the fat, which was rendered ...
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Library of Congress