4 results
Map of the New Discoveries in the Eastern Ocean
This Russian map of 1781 depicts parts of eastern Siberia and the northwestern part of the North American continent, including places reached by the Russians Mikhail Gvozdev and Ivan Sind, the English explorer Captain James Cook, and others. In 1732, the expedition led by Gvozdev and the navigator Ivan Fedorov crossed the Bering Strait between Asia and America, discovered the Diomede Islands, and approached Alaska in the vicinity of Cape Prince of Wales. The expedition landed on the shore of the North American mainland, marked on the map as the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
First Nerchinsk Regiment of Zabaikal Cossack Troops
The First Nerchinsk Cossack Regiment was created in 1898 on the basis of the First Chita Regiment. In May 1899, the regiment was relocated from Chita to the Ussuriisk Region. In 1900, it was sent to Manchuria in connection with Russia’s participation in the European effort to quell the Boxer Rebellion, an uprising against foreign influence in China. The regiment later participated in the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05 before returning to Chita after a six-year absence. This book is a historical outline of the regiment’s activities in 1898-1906 ...
Contributed by
Russian State Library
Report Map on the Hydrogeographic Work of Expeditions to the Eastern Ocean and by Squadron Ships in the Eastern Ocean for 1898 and Preceeding Years
Hydrographic maps mainly serve the needs of navigators and mariners. Other uses include fishing, oceanography, and underwater prospecting. Hydrographic mapping was highly developed in 19th-century Russia, where it was carried out by the Ministry of Marine to create and constantly update navigational charts. This map is from a larger work entitled Sobranie otchetnykh kart gidrograficheskikh rabot (Collection of Report Maps of Hydrogeographic Work and Maps Indicating Shipwrecks for 1898 in the Black Sea, Sea of Azov, Caspian Sea, White Sea, Baltic Sea, and Parts of the Eastern Ocean and ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Letter on Birch Bark from Siberia by Aleksandrs Pelēcis, June 19, 1955
On August 5, 1940, the independent country of Latvia was forcibly incorporated into the Soviet Union, after having been occupied by the Red Army in June of that year. Estonia and Lithuania suffered a similar fate. Thousands of Latvians were arrested for having anti-Soviet views, taking part in resistance movements, being farmers, belonging to political parties, or refusing to join a collective farm. Many were deported to Siberia. People who were in prisons, concentration camps, or settlements in Siberia wrote letters to friends and relatives on birch bark, which was ...
Contributed by
National Library of Latvia