52 results
Map of Sweden
This map shows the Kingdom of Sweden as it appeared at the end of the 18th century. At the time, the kingdom included present-day Sweden as well as Finland, which, however, was lost to the Russian Empire in 1809. The map is the work of Samuel Gustaf Hermelin (1744-1820), a Swedish industrialist and diplomat who also practiced cartography. Hermelin studied mining at the University of Uppsala before traveling to the United States to study industrialization. While in North America, he was instrumental in establishing diplomatic relations between Sweden and the ...
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National Library of Brazil
Atlas of Livonia, or of the Two Governments and Duchies Livonia and Estonia, and of the Province of Oesel
This work containing 14 maps is the first complete atlas of Latvia and Estonia. The compiler of the atlas, Count Ludwig August Mellin (1754-1835), was a Baltic German who was born in Tuhala, Estonia, then a province of the Russian Empire. On a visit to Riga in 1782, Crown Prince Paul of Russia reportedly asked to see a map showing the location of the Livonian division of the Russian Army. When it turned out that no such map existed, Mellin, then a young officer in the army trained in technical ...
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Library of Congress
Railway Bridge, Riga, Russia (i.e., Latvia)
This photochrome print of a bridge in Riga, Latvia (at the time part of the Russian Empire) is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Constructed in 1871-72, the bridge was the first iron railway bridge to cross the Daugava River. Baedeker’s Russia with Teheran, Port Arthur, and Peking (1914) described it as “an iron Girder Bridge . . . 1/2 M. long, supported by eight granite piers,” which led to the Mitau suburb ...
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Library of Congress
Dvinsk. Roman Catholic Church
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Dvinsk. General View of the Embankment of the Western Dvina River
The town of Dvinsk, located on the Western Dvina River, was founded by the Livonian Order in 1275 as the Dünaburg castle. As a result of the 1772 partition of Poland, the town was absorbed into the Russian Empire and became an important garrison defending the southwestern approaches to Saint Petersburg. In early July 1812 a secondary French force approached the town but was defeated. In 1893 Alexander III renamed the town Dvinsk, and by the time of this photograph it had become a regional industrial center by virtue of ...
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Library of Congress
Railroad Bridge across the Western Dvina River Near Dvinsk
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Dvinsk. View from Southwest from the Bell Tower of a Military Cathedral
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
General Map of Courland Province Showing Postal and Major Roads, Stations and the Distance in Versts Between Them
This 1820 map of Courland Province is from a larger work, Geographical Atlas of the Russian Empire, the Kingdom of Poland, and the Grand Duchy of Finland (Geograficheskii atlas Rossiiskoi imperii, tsarstva Pol'skogo i velikogo kniazhestva Finliandskogo), containing 61 maps of the Russian Empire. Compiled and engraved by Colonel V.P. Piadyshev, it reflects the detailed mapping carried out by Russian military cartographers in the first quarter of the 19th century. The map shows population centers (five gradations by size), inns, postal stations, roads (two types), provincial and district ...
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National Library of Russia
Courland Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Courland Province , located in part of present-day Latvia, and bordered by the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga. Russia acquired the territory of Courland Province ...
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National Library of Russia
Lifland Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Lifland Province, located in the western part of the empire, and bordered by the Gulf of Riga to the west and Lake Chudskoe to the east ...
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National Library of Russia
Letter on Birch Bark from Siberia by Matilde Kaktiņa, June 10, 1951
On August 5, 1940, the independent country of Latvia was forcibly incorporated into the Soviet Union, after having been occupied by the Red Army in June of that year. Estonia and Lithuania suffered a similar fate. Thousands of Latvians were arrested for having anti-Soviet views, taking part in resistance movements, being farmers, belonging to political parties, or refusing to join a collective farm. Many were deported to Siberia. People who were in prisons, concentration camps, or settlements in Siberia wrote letters to friends and relatives on birch bark, which was ...
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National Library of Latvia
Letter on Birch Bark from Siberia by Rasma Kraukle, May 19, 1945
On August 5, 1940, the independent country of Latvia was forcibly incorporated into the Soviet Union, after having been occupied by the Red Army in June of that year. Estonia and Lithuania suffered a similar fate. Thousands of Latvians were arrested for having anti-Soviet views, taking part in resistance movements, being farmers, belonging to political parties, or refusing to join a collective farm.  Many were deported to Siberia. People who were in prisons, concentration camps, or settlements in Siberia wrote letters to friends and relatives on birch bark, which was ...
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National Library of Latvia
The Ķegums Hydro Power Plant and the Temporary Bridge over the Daugava, November 1936
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken in November 1936, shows the temporary wooden bridge over the river and workers building the concrete supports for a new bridge. The historic buildings along the right bank of the river, before the reservoir was created, can be seen in the background. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern ...
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Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
The Temporary Dam for the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, December 10, 1936
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on December 10, 1936, depicts the construction of a temporary dam on the right bank of the river. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
The Ķegums Hydro Power Plant Construction Site, January 21, 1937
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on January 21, 1937, depicts workers at the construction site. Horses and wagons can be seen transporting building materials. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
The Ķegums Hydro Power Plant Turbine Assembly, July 15, 1937
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on July 15, 1937, depicts the assembly of power plant turbine suction pipes. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia as a ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
View of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant Construction Site, August 19, 1937
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on August 19, 1937, shows the construction site with the new metal bridge over the river in the foreground; part of its architectonic shape was preserved until September 1986. Housing for engineers and workers can be seen in the background, on the right bank. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries ...
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Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Construction of the Daugava Bridge and the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, October 28, 1937
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on October 28, 1937, shows the construction of the metal frame and permanent supports for the bridge over the river. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Construction of the Ice-breaking Wall at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, May 20, 1938
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on May 20, 1938, shows the blocks for concreting the ice-breaking wall at the plant. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Construction at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, July 7, 1938
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on July 7, 1938, shows the power plant building construction works. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia as a symbol of ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Construction at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant Dam, September 16, 1938
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on September 16, 1938, shows the blocks for concreting the supports of the new metal bridge over the river and ice cutters at the power plant dam. The perspective makes clear the massive scale of the project. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum