5 results
Edict Prohibiting Traveling Shows Throughout Tuscany
This edict, dated February 1, 1780, was promulgated by Domenico Brichieri Colombi, fiscal auditor of the city of Florence, in execution of orders issued by Pietro Leopoldo of Lorraine, Grand Duke of Tuscany (reigned 1765−90). It prohibited public performances by traveling entertainers so as not to give to the people “opportunities to dissipate themselves vainly.” The edict applied to “Charlatans, Cantimbanchi [street singers], Storytellers, Puppeteers, Peddlers, Jugglers, and all those who carry on freak shows, exhibit Machines, Animals, or who sell secrets, and to any other foreigner who goes ...
Contributed by
Educational Documentation Centre of Circus Arts (CEDAC)
Works of Galileo Galilei, Part 1, Volume 13, Familiar Correspondence: Letters from Women to Galileo Galilei
This codex contains letters to the Italian scientist, philosopher, and mathematician Galileo Galilei (1564–1642), including those written by his daughter Virginia, a nun in the convent of San Matteo in Arcetri, who had taken the name Sister Maria Celeste. From 1623 to 1633, Virginia faithfully wrote to her father, and her letters are a touching testimony of filial love. In 1633, Galileo was convicted of heresy for arguing the Copernican view that the Earth moves around the sun and was sentenced to life imprisonment. His sentence was commuted to ...
Contributed by
National Central Library of Florence
Royal Museum, the Court (i.e. Bargello Museum, the Courtyard), Florence, Italy
This photochrome print of the court of the Royal Museum in Florence is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Construction of the building, which was intended to be a palace, began in 1255, based on a design by the architect Lapo Tedesco (died circa 1280). From the late 13th century to the early 16th century, the building was known as the Palazzo del Popolo (Palace of the People), and was home to the podestà, or the city ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Leaning Tower, Pisa, Italy
This photochrome print of the Leaning Tower in Pisa is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Also known as Il Campanile, the marble and granite structure was built to serve as the bell tower (campanile) of the Cathedral of Pisa. Construction began in 1174 according to a design by the architect Bonnanno Pisano, but was interrupted numerous times. The tower was not completed until 1350, nearly two hundred years later. Fifty-seven meters high, the tower is built ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Pitti Palace, Royal Residence, Florence, Italy
This photochrome print of the Palazzo Pitti in Florence is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Situated on the south side of the Arno River, the palace was designed by the Renaissance architect Filippo Brunelleschi (1377–1466) around 1458, for Luca Pitti (1398-1472), a friend and servant of the Medici family. The palace was still unfinished when Pitti died. In 1550, nearly 80 years after Pitti's death, Eleonora de Toledo, the wife of Grand Duke Cosimo ...
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Library of Congress