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A Modern Depiction of Ireland, One of the British Isles
Abraham Ortelius (1527-98) was a Flemish engraver and businessman who traveled widely to pursue his commercial interests. In 1560 he became interested in scientific geography during a voyage with Gerardus Mercator. Ortelius’s major work, Theatrum orbis terrarum (Theater of the world), was published in Antwerp in 1570, at the threshold of the golden age of Dutch cartography. Theatrum presented the world in its component parts and reflected an age of exploration, broadened commercial connections, and scientific inquiry. Now considered the world’s first atlas, the original Theatrum was enhanced ...
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Library of Congress
Sean Lester
Sean Lester (1888–1959) was an Irish journalist and government official who held important positions in the League of Nations. A Protestant who was educated at the Methodist College in Belfast, he nonetheless supported Irish independence and was a member of Sinn Fein. Following the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922, he joined the country’s foreign ministry and in 1929 became Ireland’s representative to the League of Nations. He chaired committees attempting to resolve territorial disputes between Peru and Colombia and between Bolivia and Paraguay, and ...
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United Nations Office at Geneva Library
A Large Proportion of Interior Ireland Consists of Bogs from Which Peat Is Dug
This photograph of a peat cutter and a woman at a bog in Ireland is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs ...
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Library of Congress
All in One with the Irish Canadian Rangers 199th Overseas Battalion
In World War I, many Irish immigrants to Canada volunteered to serve in the Canadian armed forces. To assist with recruitment, the Canadian government established a purely Irish battalion, the Irish Canadian Rangers 199th Overseas Battalion. Based in Montreal, the unit began signing up volunteers in the winter of 1915–16. Also known as the Duchess of Connaught's Own Irish Rangers, after their royal patron, wife of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Governor-General of Canada, the rangers sailed for Europe in December 1916 and made a triumphal tour ...
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Library of Congress
For the Glory of Ireland
This World War I recruiting poster, published in Dublin in 1915, shows a woman holding a rifle. She gestures to a distant shore in flames labeled "Belgium," as she addresses a man with a walking stick. The caption reads: “Will you go or must I?” Appeals to manly pride, often voiced by women, were a common device used in posters aimed at encouraging men to enlist. The title, “For the Glory of Ireland,” appeals to national pride. Until 1922, when the southern counties seceded to form the Irish Free State ...
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Library of Congress
Irish Canadians. Enlist in an Irish and Canadian Battalion. 199th Battalion C.E.F. Irish Canadian Rangers
This World War I recruiting poster from Canada shows two soldiers, one presumably Canadian, the other Irish, shaking hands, as one points to the motto, "Small nations must be free." The background features the maple leaf and shamrocks, symbols, respectively, of Canada and Ireland. The address of the recruiting office and the name of commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel H.J. Trihey, are given at the bottom of the poster. During the war, many Irish immigrants to Canada volunteered to serve in the Canadian armed forces. To assist with recruitment, the Canadian ...
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Library of Congress
Irishmen - Avenge the Lusitania. Join an Irish Regiment To-Day
Until 1922, when the southern counties seceded to form the Irish Free State, Ireland was part of the United Kingdom. When World War I broke out, many Irish nationalists seeking independence for Ireland urged their compatriots to shun the British war effort. Some went so far as to conspire with German agents in various anti-British activities, but other Irishmen rallied to the British cause. Between 1914 and 1916, approximately 180,000 Irishmen volunteered to serve in the British armed forces. This poster, published in 1915 by the Central Council for ...
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Library of Congress