6 results
Fiume, a Street, Croatia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late 19th-century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire) that was part of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a street scene in Fiume, as the present-day city of Rijeka, Croatia, was known at the time. The city, which dates to Roman times, was part of Austria-Hungary before World War I and was populated by both Croats and ethnic Italians. It became an object of contention ...
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Library of Congress
Fiume, the Corso, Croatia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late 19th-century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire) that was part of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the famous Corso, or promenade, in Fiume, as the present-day city of Rijeka, Croatia, was known at the time. The city, which dates to Roman times, was part of Austria-Hungary before World War I and was populated by both Croats and ethnic Italians. It became an object ...
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Library of Congress
Fiume, the Mole, (i.e, Molo), Croatia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late 19th-century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire) that was part of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the dock in the town of Opatija, Croatia, or Abbazia as it was known in Italian. At the time the photo was taken, Croatia was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the Adriatic coast was populated by many ethnic Italians.
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Library of Congress
Fiume, the Harbor, Croatia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late 19th-century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire) that was part of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the harbor in Fiume, as the present-day city of Rijeka, Croatia, was known at the time. The city, which dates to Roman times, was part of Austria-Hungary before World War I and was populated by both Croats and ethnic Italians. It became an object of contention in ...
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Library of Congress
Slavonia, Croatia, Bosnia, and a part of Dalmatia
Gerard Mercator’s 1590 Sclavonia, Croatia, Bosnia cum Dalmatiae parte (Slavonia, Croatia, Bosnia, and a part of Dalmatia) is the best representation of Bosnia made up to that time. One of the oldest items in the cartographic collections of the National and University Library of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the map was published by the well-known Blaeu firm in Amsterdam. Shown are villages, towns, rivers, and mountains. The scale is in German miles. The map is in Latin, but it gives place names in the languages of the region, which include ...
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National and University Library of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Dalmatia
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Dalmatia is Number 11 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. At the time this book was written, Dalmatia was a kingdom within the Austro-Hungarian Empire, consisting of about 120 islands ...
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Library of Congress