5 results in English
Homiliary on the Gospels (Numbers 1 to 20)
This manuscript of the homilies on the Gospels by Pope Gregory I (also known as Saint Gregory the Great, circa 540−604) was written in about 800 in the Alsatian monastery of Murbach, one of the most important cultural centers of the Carolingian Empire at that time. The monastery maintained a close relationship with the monasteries of Reichenau and Saint Gallen, located on Lake Constance, and their highly innovative scriptoria. The Carolingian minuscule in this manuscript bears some distinctive traits of the Alemannic script that was typically used in these ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Germans Destroyed by Horses
This print showing horses trampling a group of German soldiers is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “In one of the battles in the Alsatian theater of the war, at Gwaldikonen, the Germans settled on a small hill and installed their field artillery there. The French tried to attack several times but they were unable to get closer. The French lancers rushed onto the battery, but were killed. Suddenly the horses, with the riders gone, galloped onto the battery ...
Contributed by The British Library
The People of Alsace and Lorraine are French!
In 1871, at the conclusion of the Franco-Prussian War, Alsace and most of Lorraine, which had been part of France before the war, were annexed to the newly-formed German Empire. The French bitterly resented the loss of these territories, and their recovery became a prime objective of French foreign policy and one of France’s chief aims during World War I. This poster, published in Paris in 1914, personifies the German annexation by depicting an Alsatian woman with her hand chained to a brick wall. The bold text on the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Alsace-Lorraine
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Alsace-Lorraine is Number 30 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. At the conclusion of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871, the newly-formed German Empire annexed from France nearly all of Alsace ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Order for the Lord's Supper
This German text of the Ordnu[n]g des Herren Nachtmal (Order for the Lord's Supper) provides an inside view of the developing Christian Reformation in the 16th century. Martin Bucer (1491–1551) led the reforms in Strassburg (present-day Strasbourg, France), and this pamphlet of 24 pages documents the changes underway in the mass—the central liturgical service of the church—and in the rite of baptism and the blessing of marriage. The Ordnung includes printed music for the sung parts of the liturgy as well as woodcuts of ...