4 results in English
La Grande Place, the Old Houses, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Grande Place in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). This square is the traditional center of Brussels, the location of city hall and the city’s market place. Its present appearance has not changed since around 1695, when the French army under Louis XIV destroyed its older structures, which had been built in the Middle Ages. The houses shown here reflect a Gothic–Baroque style of architecture, popular in the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Hubert's Gallery, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Royal Galleries St. Hubert in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located at the city center, this shopping arcade was designed by the architect Jean-Pierre Cluysenaar (1811–80) and opened in 1847 under the reign of King Leopold I to celebrate Belgium's independence in 1830. The arcade consists of two main sections, the King's Gallery and the Queen's Gallery, which are separated by a colonnade. With its ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Palace of the Nation, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Palace of the Nation in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Paleis der Natie, or Palais de la Nation, is a neoclassical building that faces the Royal Palace, or Palais Royal, and that has served as the seat of the Belgian parliament since the country’s independence in 1830. The building was constructed in 1779–83 for the assemblies of the old Council of Brabant, according to a design ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Brouckere Place and Anspach Monument, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of Brouckère Place and the Anspach Monument in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The monument was erected in 1897 to honor Jules Victor Anspach (1829–79), a former mayor of Brussels who championed urban development to benefit the city’s working class, and who was one of the chief promoters of Brussels’s boulevards. The monument features a large fountain designed by Emile Janlet (1839–1919), with sculptures by Paul de ...
Contributed by Library of Congress