4 results in English
Genealogy of Ma Family
This manuscript is a collection of records documenting the deeds and actions of four members of Ma family, prominent in Liaoyang, northeast China. They are Ma Mingpei (1600–1666), his son Ma Xiongzhen (1634–77), his grandson Ma Shiji (1650–1714), and his great-grandson Ma Guozhen (1666–1720). Ma Mingpei rose in his official career to the presidency of the Board of War and to the military governorship of Jiangnan and Jiangxi, and took part in the suppression of the Southern Ming forces in the sixth year of the Chongzhen ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of Quantong Province or Lyau-tong and of the Kingdom of Kau-li or Korea: For the Universal History of a Society of Men of Letters
This 1745 map of Korea was prepared for a universal history published in France in the 18th century. Based on an earlier English map, it is mainly in French but includes some names in German, e.g., “Das gelbe Meer” for the Yellow Sea. The notation at the bottom indicates that the prime meridian is set at Ferro Island, otherwise known as El Hierro, the southwestern-most of the Canary Islands. In his Geographia, the ancient astronomer and geographer Ptolemy (87-150) specified that maps should use coordinates stated in degrees, with ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Russian Soldier Protests as Two Japanese Soldiers Interrupt His Dinner Preparations
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Raijin, the God of Thunder, Frightens the Russians Out of Tokuriji (near Nanshan)
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by Library of Congress