4 results in English
Yongle Encyclopedia
The Yongle Encyclopedia is a large-scale encyclopedia–the largest in pre-modern China--arranged by subject categories traditionally used in China. The entire work is comprised of 22,877 juan (sections) of text proper and a prolegomenon and index in 60 juan, all bound in 11,095 volumes, amounting to about 370 million characters in all. The encyclopedia preserved textual information from about 8,000 texts of all kinds, from pre-Qin times to the early Ming dynasty, covering the works of famous specialists in such areas as astronomy, geography, human affairs, famous ...
Contributed by National Library of China
Selected Anecdotes about Su Shi and Mi Fu
This book is a collection of anecdotes about two great Song masters of poetry, painting, and calligraphy, Su Shi (1037–1101) and Mi Fu (1051–1107). It was compiled by Guo Hua, about whom little is known, reviewed by Xu Richang, and edited by Hu Zhengyan (1580–1671), a painter, calligrapher, and seal carver. Hu Zhengyan published the first Chinese color woodblock print in his house, the famed Shi zhu zhai (Ten Bamboo Studio), where this work also was printed. Su Shi, also called Su Dongpo, gained even  greater popularity ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Heroes Return to the Truth
This 1861 work was published during the Taiping Rebellion, a vast political and religious revolt against the Qing dynasty of China that lasted for more than ten years. Very few books were produced in that period, thus publications from that era are rare. The chief author of this work was He Chunfa, minister of the bureau of punishments in the court of Gan Wang (Shield King), a title bestowed by Hong Xiuquan (1813–64), the Taiping leader, to Hong Rengan (1822–64), one of his cousins. In 1851, Hong Xiuquan ...
Contributed by National Central Library
The Story of Pei Du, Who Returned the Belt He Had Found at the Fragrant Hill
This work is based on a play by the notable Yuan dynasty playwright, Guan Hanqing (circa 1225–1302), Shan shen miao Pei Du huan dai (Pei Du returned the belt at the Temple of Mountain Deity). Ming dynasty playwright Shen Cai revised the story under the title Xin kan chong ding chu xiang fu shi biao zhu Pei Du Xiangshan huan dai ji (The story of Pei Du, who returned the belt he had found at the fragrant hill). Shen’s play follows the Yuan poetic drama format, called si ...
Contributed by National Central Library