12 results in English
Maps of Shazhou in Jiangyin County
The land on which Shazhou, Jiangyin County, Jiangsu Province (present-day Zhangjiagang) is located was formed by alluvial deposits of the Yangtze River over a period of thousands of years. As the land grew and changed, local people made paintings of the area, which they petitioned the authorities to acquire. Measurements of the narrow strip of land formed by the river deposits differed, and those seeking to obtain land often conspired with officials, resulting in lawsuits and disorder. Two officials, Wu Heng and Xie Cunbin, together with the magistrate of Jiangyin ...
Contributed by National Central Library
Supplement to the Local Gazetteer of Wu Prefecture
Wujun (Wu Prefecture) is an ancient name used during the Qin and Han (221 BCE–220 CE) for the seat of Guiji (situated in present-day Suzhou). The words tu jing in the title denote an older type of local gazetteer, which first appeared during the Eastern Han (25–220 CE). It was not until the Southern Song that such works were replaced by more formal gazetteers. This printed work is a very rare Song edition. The work goes back to 1099, the second year of Yuanfu era during the reign ...
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Colored Waterway Map of the Grand Canal from Yueyang to the Yangtze River Estuary and from Jiangyin to the Forbidden City of Beijing
The world-famous Beijing−Hangzhou Grand Canal is the oldest and longest artificial waterway in the world. Starting from Beijing in the north, it passes southwards to Hangzhou. Construction of the canal, which links some of China’s most important river networks, began in the fifth century BC. By the 13th century, the total length of the canal was more than 2,000 kilometers. Today, its length is 1794 kilometers. This map, executed in the traditional painting style, shows its entire length in a single long scroll. It is one of ...
Contributed by National Library of China
Yongle Encyclopedia
The Yongle Encyclopedia is a large-scale encyclopedia–the largest in pre-modern China--arranged by subject categories traditionally used in China. The entire work is comprised of 22,877 juan (sections) of text proper and a prolegomenon and index in 60 juan, all bound in 11,095 volumes, amounting to about 370 million characters in all. The encyclopedia preserved textual information from about 8,000 texts of all kinds, from pre-Qin times to the early Ming dynasty, covering the works of famous specialists in such areas as astronomy, geography, human affairs, famous ...
Contributed by National Library of China
China, Kiangsu Province, Shanghai, Industrial Plants on Soochow Creek, with Boats at a Cotton Mill in the Foreground
This photograph of a scene showing Suzhou Creek in Jiangsu Province, near Shanghai, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Illustrated Album of Yangzhou Prefecture
The album, by an unknown artist, contains twelve illustrations depicting Yangzhou Prefecture and the eleven counties of Jiangdu, Guazhou, Yizhen, Qinxing, Gaoyou, Xinghua, Baoying, Qinzhou, Rugao, Tongzhou, and Haimen. Each illustration is followed by an essay on the history of the county depicted. Situated along the Grand Canal and close to the Yangtze River, Yangzhou had been a leading economic and cultural center and major trading port since the Tang dynasty. This work provides both textual and visual testimony to its place in history. The information in the county histories ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Selected Anecdotes about Su Shi and Mi Fu
This book is a collection of anecdotes about two great Song masters of poetry, painting, and calligraphy, Su Shi (1037–1101) and Mi Fu (1051–1107). It was compiled by Guo Hua, about whom little is known, reviewed by Xu Richang, and edited by Hu Zhengyan (1580–1671), a painter, calligrapher, and seal carver. Hu Zhengyan published the first Chinese color woodblock print in his house, the famed Shi zhu zhai (Ten Bamboo Studio), where this work also was printed. Su Shi, also called Su Dongpo, gained even  greater popularity ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Factual Records on Huaiyin
Huaiyin, also known as Huai’an, was a prefectural city in Jiangsu Province, situated on an ancient section of the Grand Canal and the Huai River, major waterways for transporting grain. The Huai linked the Yellow River and Yangtze River, and, like them, originally ran from west to east, flowing directly to the sea. In the 12th century, Jin and Song armies, using flooding as a weapon of war, changed the course of the Yellow River so that it flowed south into the Huai. The Yellow River sediment gradually brought ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Heroes Return to the Truth
This 1861 work was published during the Taiping Rebellion, a vast political and religious revolt against the Qing dynasty of China that lasted for more than ten years. Very few books were produced in that period, thus publications from that era are rare. The chief author of this work was He Chunfa, minister of the bureau of punishments in the court of Gan Wang (Shield King), a title bestowed by Hong Xiuquan (1813–64), the Taiping leader, to Hong Rengan (1822–64), one of his cousins. In 1851, Hong Xiuquan ...
Contributed by National Central Library
A Complete Illustrated Atlas of Counties under the Jurisdiction of the Jiangning Administrative Government
Jiangning was designated a province in the 25th year of the Qianlong reign of the Qing dynasty (1760). The provincial administrative government was established under the supervision of the governor-general of two Yangtze provinces, one of eight governor-generalships instituted during the Qing dynasty. The province straddled the Yangtze River and was close to the sea, bordering Anhui and Sichuan to the south and Henan to the north. Under its jurisdiction were four prefectures, two directly-controlled divisions, one subprefecture, and 33 divisions and counties. The territory stretched more than 750 li ...
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A Complete View of the Canal from Jiangsu to Beijing
Jiangsu zhi Beijing yun he quan tu (A complete view of the canal from Jiangsu to Beijing) is made of a long continuous sheet of paper folded into accordion-like leaves. It has 21 folds, each 24.1 centimeters high and 13 centimeters wide. The title at the beginning is handwritten in ink and the calligraphy is in the official script style. The work was printed in the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), but the author and the date of publication are unknown. The three-line inscription on the left indicates that the ...
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The Story of Pei Du, Who Returned the Belt He Had Found at the Fragrant Hill
This work is based on a play by the notable Yuan dynasty playwright, Guan Hanqing (circa 1225–1302), Shan shen miao Pei Du huan dai (Pei Du returned the belt at the Temple of Mountain Deity). Ming dynasty playwright Shen Cai revised the story under the title Xin kan chong ding chu xiang fu shi biao zhu Pei Du Xiangshan huan dai ji (The story of Pei Du, who returned the belt he had found at the fragrant hill). Shen’s play follows the Yuan poetic drama format, called si ...
Contributed by National Central Library