5 results in English
Group of Afghan Durbaries in Lahore, December 1880
This 1880 photograph of a group of Afghan notables in Lahore is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The Persian term durbar (darbar in Hindi) used in the caption describes a gathering of princes and other notables, usually for the purposes of state administration and business. In this durbar two British officers are present, one on the floor to the left of center and the other behind him, suggesting that they might have been cooperating with the Afghan attendees ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Bridge Across the Indus at Attock
This photograph of a pontoon bridge across the Indus River is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Pontoon bridges such as this one, formed from boats lashed together by various materials, were easily assembled and disassembled. This pontoon bridge was built near the town of Attock in Punjab Province, in present-day Pakistan, and likely was used by the British Army to ferry supplies and troops across the Indus. Laborers, fishermen, travelers, soldiers, and pack animals are seen in the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A History of the University of the Panjab
The University of the Punjab (as it is now spelled) was formally established in Lahore, in present-day Pakistan, in 1882. It was the fourth university founded by the British colonial authorities on the Indian subcontinent, the first three being at the initial British strongholds of Bombay, Madras, and Calcutta. The University of the Punjab was from the beginning both a teaching and an examining body, and it was the first higher education institution in India in a majority Muslim area. J.F. Bruce (1867–1933), who published this work in ...
Quatrain on Freedom
This calligraphic fragment includes a ruba'i (iambic pentameter quatrain) promoting personal independence and khatir (the renunciation of attachment to people and places). Beginning with an invocation to huwa al-mu'izz (God as the Glorified), the verses read: “Do not get tied to any person or to any place / Because the land and sea are vast and people are many / If a thousand beautiful ones come towards you / Look, move on, and do not get attached to anybody.” Executed in black nasta'liq script on a beige paper, the verses ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Panjabi Grammar: A Brief Grammar of Panjabi As Spoken in the Wazirabad District
Thomas Grahame Bailey (1872–1942) was a Church of Scotland missionary in India who made extensive studies of northern Indian languages. After studying Hindi and Urdu at the London University School of Oriental Studies, he went on to publish books on Panjabi (now usually called Punjabi), Himalayan dialects, Urdu, Kanauri, Kashmiri, Shina, and other languages. Panjabi Grammar: A Brief Grammar of Panjabi As Spoken in the Wazirabad District was written at the request of an official of the government of Punjab, in what was then a part of British India ...