11 results in English
Peshawar Fort
This photograph of Peshawar Fort is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Also known as Bala Hissar (High Fort, in Persian), the fort served as the winter capital of the Durrani Empire (1747–1818). It was reconstructed in 1835 under the Sikh Empire (1799–1849), after its conquest by Sikh forces, but was captured by the British in 1849. The fort dominates the background of the photograph. The dirt road in the foreground is the Grand Trunk Road running ...
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Jamrūd Fort near the Khyber
This photograph of Jamrūd Fort is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The three tribesmen in the foreground of the picture wear loose tunics, longi (turbans), and dōpâta (shawls) and carry jezails (long heavy muskets). The fort is located at the eastern entrance to the Khyber Pass (in present-day Pakistan), the strategically important pass through the Hindu Kush mountain range along the historic Silk Road that in the 19th century linked British India and Afghanistan. It was the site ...
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Jamrūd Fort, Another View
This photograph of Jamrūd Fort is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The fort is located in present-day Pakistan at the east entrance to the Khyber Pass, the strategically important mountain pass through the Hindu Kush mountain range along the historic Silk Road that in the 19th century linked Afghanistan with British India. It was the site of a major battle between the Sikh and Durrani Empires in 1836–37. Even though the fort appears to be in disrepair ...
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Group of Afridis at Jamrūd, 1866
This photograph of a group of Afridi tribesmen with rifles is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The Afridi are Pashtun Afghans, part of the Karlani tribal confederacy, who both fought against and with the British in Afghanistan during all three Anglo-Afghan wars. The British frequently classified the peoples that they conquered with fixed personality or “racial” traits. They regarded both the Punjabi Sikhs and the Afghan Afridi tribesmen as “warlike” peoples. Different Afridi clans cooperated with the British ...
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Ali Masjid and Surroundings
This photograph of Ali Masjid is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Ali Masjid is a small shrine located at the narrowest point in the Khyber Pass, to the east of the city of Landi Kotal. The shrine is dedicated to ʻAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib (circa 600–661), nephew and son-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad and one of the first converts to Islam. Above the shrine sits a fort, at the highest point of the pass (visible atop the ...
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Ali Masjid and the British Camp, 1878
This photograph of the British camp at Ali Masjid is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Ali Masjid is located in the narrowest part of the Khyber Pass, and was the first location captured by General Sir Samuel Browne (1824–1901) on his march with the Peshawar Valley Field Force towards Kabul at the start of war. The battle took place on November 21, 1878. Browne’s victorious British and Indian troops faced the Afghan army and tribesmen led ...
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Gorge Below Ali Masjid
This photograph of the gorge below Ali Masjid is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Ali Masjid is located at the narrowest point in the Khyber Pass and contains a shrine to ʻAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib (circa 600–661), the nephew and son-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad, one of the first converts to Islam and held to be particularly holy for his being born inside the Kaaba at Mecca. The fortress above the shrine was built in 1837 by ...
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Ali Masjid from Below
This photograph of Ali Masjid is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Ali Masjid is located at the narrowest point in the Khyber Pass. It contains a shrine to ʻAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib (circa 600–661), the nephew and son-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad, and a fortress built in 1837 by the Afghan amir, Dōst Mohammad Khān (1793–1863). The shrine and fort are located in extremely rugged terrain overlooking a deep gorge. The figures in the foreground, one ...
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Captured Guns at Ali Masjid
This photograph of artillery pieces captured by British forces in the Battle of Ali Masjid is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. In the battle, which took place in November 1878, a British and Indian force led by General Sir Samuel Browne (1824–1901) won a victory over the Afghan Army and tribesmen led by Gholam Hyder Khan. Browne captured the fort at Ali Masjid and then marched to Kabul, prompting the Afghan amir, Sher ʻAlī Khān (1825–79 ...
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Camp on Shagai Heights
This photograph of the British camp on the Shagai Plateau is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The ascent to the Shagai Plateau begins shortly after the entrance to the Khyber Pass from the southeast (at Peshawar, in present-day Pakistan). The encampment of the conical tents of the Peshawar Valley Field Force stretches off into the horizon. The camels seen among the tents were used by the British and Indian troops to transport supplies and equipment. Smaller hills in ...
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Kohat Pass
This photograph of Afridi tribesmen at the Kohat Pass is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The Kohat Pass links the town of Kohat with Peshawar further to north. The pass is the home territory of the Pashtun Afridi tribe, who were regarded by the British authorities as a strongly independent and “warlike” tribe. The Afridi men shown here are observing the photographer, who might have been John Burke. He was rejected as an official photographer but accompanied the ...
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