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The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
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National Library of Uganda
Report of the Constitutional Committee 1959
This four-part report was prepared in 1959 by a constitutional committee established by Sir Frederick Crawford, Governor of Uganda, as the then-protectorate of Uganda prepared for independence from Great Britain. The committee was chaired by John Wild, and included two other Europeans, two Asians, and ten Africans. It was “to consider, and to recommend to the Governor, the form of direct elections on a common roll for the representative members of the Legislative Council to be introduced in 1961, the number of seats to be filled under the above system ...
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National Library of Uganda
The Mailo System in Buganda: A Preliminary Case Study in African Land Tenure
The basic unit of the mailo system is a square mile, hence the derivation of mailo, which is also equivalent to 640 acres. The term is used in Uganda to describe a land tenure system that came into effect when the kingdom of Buganda signed an agreement with the British-administered Uganda Protectorate there in 1900. Buganda runs along the northwest shore of Lake Victoria, in present-day south-central Uganda. This work is by Henry W. West, who was assistant commissioner for lands and surveys in the early 1960s and the foremost ...
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National Library of Uganda
The Lango: A Nilotic Tribe of Uganda
This 1923 study of the Lango people of north-central Uganda narrates the origins and history of the group, which had a form of government based on minor clan chiefs, rather than a king or superior chief, before the arrival of the British rule. Jack Herbert Driberg (1888–1946) was a British official in the service of the Uganda Protectorate in 1912–21 and lived and worked among the Lango, for whom he had both sympathy and admiration. He describes the ethnology of the Lango nation; their environment, including the fauna ...
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National Library of Uganda
The Buganda Agreement, 1955
By the late 19th century, Buganda was a powerful East African kingdom, running along the northwest shore of Lake Victoria, in present-day south-central Uganda.  The Buganda Agreement of 1900, which gave Buganda a large degree of internal autonomy within the British-ruled Uganda Protectorate, was modified by this 1955 treaty. The Buganda Agreement, 1955 was made on October 18 of that year, between Sir Andrew Cohen, Governor and Commander in Chief of the Uganda Protectorate, on behalf of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and ...
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National Library of Uganda
Entebbe: Uganda, Africa 1: 250,000
This 1911 map shows Entebbe, the seat of government of the Protectorate of Uganda prior to independence in 1962. It is based on surveys by the Uganda Topographical Survey of 1909–10 and the Uganda Survey Department of 1907–8, completed by the Geographical Section of the General Staff, and printed at the War Office in London. Depicted are the counties, kingdoms, water springs, and major towns within and around Entebbe, along with telegraph lines and stations, railways, post offices, and Protestant and Catholic mission stations. Five categories of roads ...
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National Library of Uganda