18 results
Cairo to Kisumu: Egypt-Sudan-Kenya Colony
Cairo to Kisumu: Egypt-Sudan-Kenya Colony was the fifth in a series of books known as Carpenter’s World Travels, written by Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) in the 1920s and published by the Garden City, New York, firm of Doubleday, Page & Company. Carpenter was an American author of books on travel and world geography whose geographical readers were popular in American schools in the early 20th century. Cairo to Kisumu is not an account of a single journey, but a composite based on the notes Carpenter made on several trips ...
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Library of Congress
German East Africa as a Settlement Region for Europeans, Taking into Consideration British East Africa and Nyassaland
As imperial Germany began creating an overseas empire in the late 19th century, many influential Germans sought to emulate the example of Great Britain, which had built its large and powerful empire in part by promoting the settlement of immigrants from the British Isles to British-controlled territories in other parts of the world, including East Africa and South Africa. Germany declared a protectorate in East Africa in 1885 and established the colony of German East Africa (present-day Tanzania, Rwanda, and Burundi) in 1891. In 1908, Friedrich von Lindequist, undersecretary in ...
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Library of Congress
The Victoria Nyanza. The Land, the Races and their Customs, with Specimens of Some of the Dialects
Lake Victoria (in the Bantu language, Victoria Nyanza), is the largest lake in Africa and the second largest body of fresh water in the world, surpassed only by Lake Superior in North America. The lake is crossed by the equator, and is the chief source of the Nile River. The first European to reach the lake was the British explorer John Hanning Speke in 1858, who named it after Britain’s Queen Victoria. In 1890, at the height of the European scramble for colonies in Africa, Britain and Germany divided ...
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Library of Congress
A Drawing (with a Western Perspective) of the East Indies from the Promontory of Good Hope to Cape Comorin
This portolan map by the Dutch engraver, publisher, and map seller Frederick de Wit (1629 or 1630-1706) shows the Indian Ocean from the Cape of Good Hope to the west coast of India (Malabar). The map was first published in 1675 and was reprinted in 1715. It is oriented with east at the top. Kishm is placed in the present-day United Arab Emirates (UAE) and repeated as “Quaro” and “Quiximi.” The shape of the Arabian or Persian Gulf differs from that shown on other maps. There is a big island ...
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Qatar National Library
Sketch of Equatorial Africa: Containing the Latest Information Collected by Agents of the International Society of the Congo
The Association Internationale du Congo (International Association of the Congo) was an organization established by King Leopold II of Belgium to lay the basis for creation of a central African colony. Between 1879 and 1884, Leopold employed the explorer Henry M. Stanley to acquire from local chiefs, by means of treaties they did not understand or were coerced into signing, tracts of land along the Congo River and its tributaries. The association also established posts along the river. At an international congress in Berlin that convened on November 15, 1884 ...
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Library of Congress
Natal, Rhodesia, and British East Africa
In May 1910, the Verein für Sozialpolitik (Association for Social Policy), an influential organization of German economists based in Berlin, decided to commission a series of studies on the colonization and settlement of tropical regions by Europeans, with the goal of determining whether and under what conditions such colonization was economically and socially sustainable. The studies were to assist in the development of the German overseas empire, and German East Africa in particular. Each study was to include an overview of a particular region of settlement; analyses of its economy ...
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Library of Congress
Members of a Royal(?) Family Gathered for a Group Portrait, Kenya
This photograph, taken in Kenya in the early 20th century, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film ...
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Library of Congress
Large Group of People Gathered Around Some Men with Musical Instruments, Mombasa, Kenya
This photograph, taken in Kenya some time in the early 20th century, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass ...
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Library of Congress
Street Scene, Nairobi, Kenya Photo by D.V. Figueira, Mombasa
This photograph, showing a general store in Nairobi, Kenya, sometime in the first quarter of the 20th century, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16 ...
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Library of Congress
Through Unknown African Countries: the First Expedition from Somaliland to Lake Rudolf
A. Donaldson Smith was an American medical doctor and amateur big-game hunter who, in 1894-95, undertook an 18-month expedition from Berbera, Somalia (then British Somaliland) to Lake Turkana (then Lake Rudolf) in Kenya. He explored the headwaters of the Shabeelle River in Ethiopia and, on his return journey, descended the Tana River to the Kenyan coast. This book is his account of the expedition. Its appendices contain detailed descriptions and illustrations of the fishes, spiders and scorpions, moths, geological specimens, fossils, plants, and ethnographic objects collected on the expedition. Also ...
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Library of Congress
Ecclesia Anglicana: For What Does She Stand?
Frank Weston (1871–1924) was an Anglican clergyman who served as bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania) in 1908–24. He was a staunch Anglo-Catholic, meaning he belonged to the wing of the Anglican Church that emphasized the church’s continuity with its Roman Catholic heritage rather than its Protestant identity. Weston became involved in the bitter Kikuyu controversy of 1913–14, which arose from a 1913 conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya), British East Africa, where Anglicans, Methodists, and Presbyterians agreed to federate in response to a perceived threat from non-Christian ...
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National Library of Uganda
Steps towards Reunion: A Statement for the Consultative Committee
At a conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya) in 1913, British missionaries from the Anglican, Methodist, and Presbyterian churches agreed to a Scheme of Federation to help them compete with non-Christian groups in Africa and to avoid transplanting the “unhappy divisions” among the churches of Britain to the mission field. The conference gave rise to a bitter controversy within the Anglican Church. Frank Weston, bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania), objected to federation with the other churches. He accused two of the leading Anglicans involved in the conference, William George Peel, bishop ...
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National Library of Uganda
The Case against Kikuyu: A Study in Vital Principles
Frank Weston (1871–1924) was an Anglican clergyman who served as bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania) in 1908–24. He was a staunch Anglo-Catholic, meaning he belonged to the wing of the Anglican Church that emphasized the church’s continuity with its Roman Catholic heritage rather than its Protestant identity. Weston became involved in the bitter Kikuyu controversy of 1913–14, which arose from a 1913 conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya), British East Africa, where Anglicans, Methodists, and Presbyterians agreed to federate in response to a perceived threat from non-Christian ...
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National Library of Uganda
Kikuyu
At a conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya) in 1913, British missionaries from the Anglican, Methodist, and Presbyterian churches agreed to a Scheme of Federation to help them compete with non-Christian groups in Africa and to avoid transplanting the “unhappy divisions” among the churches of Britain to the mission field. The conference gave rise to a bitter controversy within the Anglican Church. Frank Weston, bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania), objected to federation with the other churches. He accused the leading Anglicans involved in the conference, William George Peel, bishop of Mombasa ...
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National Library of Uganda
Eighteen Years in Uganda and East Africa
Eighteen Years in Uganda and East Africa is an account in two volumes by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914) of his work as Anglican bishop of Eastern Equatorial Africa in 1890–99 and as the first bishop of Uganda from 1899 until 1908, when the book was published. Volume 1 includes a review of the early history of European involvement in East Africa, from the arrival of the first Church Missionary Society (CMS) missionary in Mombasa (present-day Kenya) in 1844. It recounts Tucker’s arrival in Africa in 1890 and ...
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National Library of Uganda
Tucker of Uganda: Artist and Apostle, 1849-1914
Tucker of Uganda: Artist and Apostle, 1849-1914 is a biography of Alfred R. Tucker, the first bishop of Uganda. The book traces Tucker’s early life in England, his training and success as an artist, his studies at Oxford, his work as an Anglican clergyman, and his call to go to Africa as a missionary. Consecrated bishop of Eastern Equatorial Africa by the Archbishop of Canterbury on April 25, 1890, Tucker left for Africa the same day. He made a survey trip of the Uganda Protectorate in late 1890–early ...
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National Library of Uganda
Men and Creatures in Uganda
This book is a first-hand account of a trip taken by John Bland-Sutton (1855–1936) in 1910 from the port of Mombasa (present-day Kenya) to Uganda and back to the coast via the Rift Valley of Ethiopia and Kenya. Bland-Sutton was a distinguished British surgeon who did pioneering work in several areas of medicine. His interest in the natural sciences is reflected in his careful descriptions of the animals he observed, which included antelopes, gazelles, lions, crocodiles, and many species of birds. The book also provides descriptions of the Masai ...
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National Library of Uganda
East Africa and Uganda, or, Our Last Land
John Cathcart Wason (1848–1921) was a Scottish-born farmer and politician who as a young man immigrated to New Zealand, where he acquired large landholdings and was elected to the national parliament. In 1900 he sold his New Zealand estate and returned to Scotland, where he was elected to the British parliament. Wason took an interest in colonial affairs and was particularly concerned about what he saw as the British government’s mismanagement of British East Africa and the Uganda Protectorate, which he regarded as the last territories in the ...
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National Library of Uganda