6 results in English
French Mandate for Togoland
As a consequence of World War I, Germany was stripped of its colonies and the Ottoman Empire was partitioned and forced to surrender control of territories in the Middle East. The Covenant of the League of Nations established a system under which the League conferred upon certain states a mandate to rule those former colonies which, in the language of the Covenant, were “inhabited by peoples not yet able to stand by themselves under the strenuous conditions of the modern world.” Britain and the British Empire, France, Belgium, and Japan ...
Ghana, One Year Old: a First Independence Anniversary Review
This pamphlet recaptures the main events of the first year of Ghana’s history as an independent country. It features texts on politics by the prime minister and the leader of the opposition, a political year in review, and greetings from foreign leaders. Also included are articles on the arts, sports, education, science, and agriculture of the country, as well as stories about Ghana’s role in the world and its plans for the future. Moses Danquah, a long-time columnist for the Daily Graphic and one of Ghana’s most ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Guinea Itself, as Well as the Greatest Portion of Nigritia or the Land of the Blacks, the One Called Ethiopia Inferior by Modern Geographers, the Other Southern Ethiopia
This 1743 map shows western Africa from the territory of present-day Gabon in the south to Niger, Mali, and Mauritania in the north. The map was published in Nuremberg, Germany, by the firm of Homännische Erben, meaning the successors of the Nuremberg engraver and publisher Johann Baptist Homann (1663-1724) and his son, Johann Christoph Homann (1703-30). It is based on an earlier work by the great French mapmaker Jean Baptiste d’Anville (1697-1782). The illustration at the lower left depicts an African village. Items such as dress, houses and other ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Ghana’s Policy at Home and Abroad: Text of Speech Given in the Ghana Parliament, August 29, 1957
On March 6, 1957, Ghana became the first country in sub-Saharan Africa to achieve independence from a European colonial power. The new state was made up of the former British colony of the Gold Coast and the Trusteeship Territory of Togoland. The country’s first prime minister (and later president) was Kwame Nkrumah (1909-72), a U.S.-educated political activist who led the fight for independence from Britain. In this speech, delivered to the parliament of Ghana and circulated internationally by the country’s newly-established embassies, Nkrumah gave a progress ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Togo under the German Flag
Germany, a latecomer to the competition among the European powers for colonies in Africa, established the Togoland Protectorate in 1884. Encompassing the territory of present-day Togo and the Volta Region District of Ghana in western Africa, Togo was portrayed by German imperial circles as a model colony, financially self-sufficient and benefiting from bridges, roads, and railroads built to support an agricultural industry based on cacao, coffee, and cotton exports. Later historians disputed this characterization, noting the often harsh treatment of the Togolese under German rule. The German authorities used scientific ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Adoo Quamina, 1820
This 1820 hand-colored aquatint after William Hutton (1797–1860) depicts Adoo Quamina, a captain and courtier to the Ashanti king. It forms the frontispiece to Hutton’s book A Voyage to Africain the Year 1820, which was published in London the following year. Hutton was formerly the British acting consul to Ashanti, a powerful West African state in the region of present-day Ghana, and an officer serving in the British African Company of Merchants. He described the warrior as appearing “in his war-dress, with his body covered with fetishes ...
Contributed by Brown University Library