9 results in English
The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
Narrative of an Expedition to Explore the River Zaire, Usually Called the Congo, in South Africa, in 1816
James Kingston Tuckey (1776-1816) was a British naval officer who, after service in the Caribbean, Asia, and Australia, was asked by the British government to command an expedition to explore the Congo River. He was to ascertain, in particular, whether the Congo was connected to the Niger River. Tuckey traveled 480 kilometers up the Congo, mapping the river and gathering ethnographic and geographic information. Before he could complete his mission, he died of fever (on October 4, 1816, near Moanda, in the present-day Democratic Republic of the Congo). This work ...
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Dictionary and Grammar of the Kongo Language, as Spoken at San Salvador, the Ancient Capital of the Old Kongo Empire, West Africa: Preface
William Holman Bentley (1855–1905) was born in Sudbury, United Kingdom, where his father was a Baptist minister. After working for a time as a bank clerk, he was accepted by the Baptist Missionary Society for its new Congo mission and, in April 1879, he sailed for the Congo with three other missionaries. In January 1881, Bentley and H.E. Crudgington became the first Europeans to establish a route inland from the mouth of the Congo River to Stanley Pool, site of present-day Kinshasa. While building mission stations and traveling ...
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The Colonial Expansion of French Congo
L’Expansion coloniale au Congo français (The colonial expansion of French Congo) is a study of the history, geography, population, administrative structures, and economy of Congo, published in 1906 in conjunction with the French Colonial Exposition in Marseille. In the years before World War I, France’s global empire, second in size only to Britain’s, was nearing its peak. The exposition was intended to glorify France’s civilizing mission as well as to highlight its profitable trade with the colonies, much of which passed through the port of Marseille ...
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Travels in South Africa in the Years 1849 to 1857
László Magyar (1814-64) was a Hungarian explorer who lived for 17 years in Angola and made important contributions to the study of the geography and ethnography of equatorial Africa. He was trained as a naval officer and served in the naval forces of Austria and Argentina. In 1846, he undertook his first expedition in Africa, a voyage up the Congo River. Magyar subsequently married a daughter of the King of Bihé and used his family connections to gain access to interior regions of the continent. Accompanied by a royal guard ...
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László Magyar's Travels in Southern Africa Between 1849 and 1857
László Magyar (1814-64) was a Hungarian explorer who lived for 17 years in Angola and made important contributions to the study of the geography and ethnography of equatorial Africa. He was trained as a naval officer and served in the naval forces of Austria and Argentina. In 1846, he undertook his first expedition in Africa, a voyage up the Congo River. Magyar subsequently married a daughter of the King of Bihé and used his family connections to gain access to interior regions of the continent. Accompanied by a royal guard ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sketch of Equatorial Africa: Containing the Latest Information Collected by Agents of the International Society of the Congo
The Association Internationale du Congo (International Association of the Congo) was an organization established by King Leopold II of Belgium to lay the basis for creation of a central African colony. Between 1879 and 1884, Leopold employed the explorer Henry M. Stanley to acquire from local chiefs, by means of treaties they did not understand or were coerced into signing, tracts of land along the Congo River and its tributaries. The association also established posts along the river. At an international congress in Berlin that convened on November 15, 1884 ...
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A Map of the Great Forest Region, Showing the Routes of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition, from the River Congo to the Victoria Nyanza
After his successful search for David Livingstone in 1871-72, the journalist Henry M. Stanley went on to become a celebrated African explorer in his own right. He led two further expeditions, an Anglo-American expedition in 1874-77, in which he explored the lakes of central Africa, and a relief expedition in 1887-90, ostensibly to rescue Emin Pasha (1840-92). Emin, a German explorer whose original name was Eduard Schnitzler, was the governor of Equatoria, the southernmost district of the Sudan, then ruled by Egypt. He was cut off from the outside world ...
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Map of the Belgian Congo
Little is known about the actual cartographer and engraver of this map, Léon de Moor. More is known about the publishing house, J. Lebègue and Co. The firm published many geographical documents, including maps and travel accounts. In 1896, when this map was published, the Belgian Congo–known as the Congo Free State–was actually a personal possession of King Leopold II and not an official Belgian colony. The king was engaged in a vigorous publicity campaign aimed at convincing the other European powers to recognize the legitimacy of his ...
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