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Classical Islamic Education Institutions in Hindustan
This work covers the history of madrasah education in India, from its earliest foundations under Sultan Mahmud Ghaznavi (979–1030), a patron of learning who ruled over an extensive empire that included most of present-day Afghanistan, eastern Iran, Pakistan, and northwestern India. Madrasahs, or Islamic religious schools, became widespread after the beginning of the Delhi sultanate in 1206, making them among the oldest active institutions in India. The early madrasahs were centers of learning, which educated the sons of rulers and personnel for government administration. When Muslim rule declined with ...
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Government College University Lahore
Articles in Pink Urdu
This publication consists of articles written by Siddiq Irshad Mullā Rumūzī (also seen as Ramozi, 1896–1952), a celebrated Urdu humorist and satirist. His subjects here are politicians and their actions, events involving politicians, and the state of the economy. His essays in this booklet also poke fun at so-called religious people, whom he deems imperceptive of the true essence of Islam and who blindly follow old traditions without any logic. While disapproving of people and situations and suggesting reforms, Mullā Rumūzī was careful not to criticize his country. Critics ...
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Government College University Lahore
The Drama of Akbar
Muḥammad Ḥusain Āzād (also called Ehsan Azad, circa 1834–1910) was a successful Urdu poet and a writer of vivid prose, particularly in his historical writing. He was born in Delhi, where his father, Muhammad Baqir, edited the first Urdu newspaper, Delhi Urdu Akhbar. Muhammad Baqir’s involvement in the Uprising of 1857 (also known as the Sepoy Rebellion) led to his execution by the British. His son moved to Lahore several years later, where he taught Arabic at Government College and was subsequently professor of Urdu and Persian at ...
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Government College University Lahore
Earthquakes of India: Volume I
This work describes the events before, during, and after a massive earthquake that struck early in the morning of April 4, 1905, at Kangra, a town in the Himalayan foothills in the northern region of India historically known as Punjab (in the present-day state of Himachal Pradesh). Before the quake, seismic activity had extinguished the flames of combustible gas that usually jetted out at the nearby Hindu temple of Jawala Mukhi, and worshippers thought the gods displeased. The earthquake and its aftershocks killed between 20,000 and 25,000 people ...
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Government College University Lahore
Sound Advice
Muḥammad Ḥusain Āzād (also called Ehsan Azad, circa 1834–1910) was a successful Urdu poet and a writer of vivid prose, particularly in his historical writing. He was born in Delhi, where his father, Muhammad Baqir, edited the first Urdu newspaper, Delhi Urdu Akhbar. Muhammad Baqir’s involvement in the Uprising of 1857 (also known as the Sepoy Rebellion) led to his execution by the British. Āzād moved to Lahore several years later, where he taught Arabic at Government College and was subsequently professor of Urdu and Persian at Oriental ...
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Government College University Lahore
History of Babylon and Nineveh
Tarikh e Babul Wa Nainawa (History of Babylon and Nineveh) is a history in Urdu of these two ancient cities. Babylon was founded early in the third millennium BC, at a site between the Euphrates and Tigris Rivers, south of present-day Baghdad, Iraq. It became important under Hammurabi (ruled 1792–50 BC), was ruled by the Neo-Babylonian emperor Nebuchadnezzar II (circa 634–562 BC, reigned circa 605–562 BC), and was conquered by Alexander the Great in 331 BC. Nineveh was on the east bank of the Tigris in ancient ...
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Government College University Lahore
Black Waters: The Strange History of Port Blair
Tavarikh-i ‘ajib (Black waters: The strange history of Port Blair) is an account of the British penal colony of Port Blair, located in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands in the Indian Ocean. The British first established a naval base and penal colony on the islands in 1789, which they had abandoned by 1796 because of disease. Following the Uprising of 1857 (also known as the Sepoy Rebellion), the British authorities in India saw a new need for a secure prison in a remote location, and construction began in Port Blair ...
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Government College University Lahore
A History of Sindh: Volume I
The prolific Urdu author and journalist Abdulhalīm Sharar (1860–1926) was born in and spent much of his life in Lucknow (in present-day Uttar Pradesh, India). He produced biographies, historical novels, romantic novels, histories, essays, and other works. Tarikh-e-Sindh (A history of Sindh) is one of Sharar’s major historical works. Permanent settlement in Sindh, a province of present-day Pakistan, dates back to about 7000 BC. The Indus Valley civilization, one of the world’s oldest cultures, flourished in Sindh in 3300–1750 BC, rivaling those of Egypt and Mesopotamia ...
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Government College University Lahore
The History of the Urdu Language
This work, published in Delhi in 1920, is a history of the Urdu language from its origins to the development of an Urdu literature. Urdu and Hindi share an Indo-Aryan base, but Urdu is associated with the Nastaliq script style of Persian calligraphy and reads right-to-left, whereas Hindi resembles Sanskrit and reads left-to-right. The earliest linguistic influences in the development of Urdu probably began with the Muslim conquest of Sindh in 711. The language started evolving from Farsi and Arabic contacts during the invasions of the Indian subcontinent by Persian ...
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Government College University Lahore
Family Practitioner
Homeopathy was introduced to India in the 1830s by John Martin Honigberger (1795–1869), a Romanian-born student of Samuel Hahnemann (1755–1843), the German physician regarded as the founder of homeopathic medicine. Honigberger spent some 15 years in Lahore, where his early patients included Maharaja Ranjit Singh of Punjab and the son of the Maharaja’s military advisor, General Jean François Allard. Homeopathy first flourished in Punjab and Bengal, before spreading to other parts of British India. In this book, Mirza Allah Baig Lakhnavi gives concise instructions for the purchase ...
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Government College University Lahore
Dictionary of Urdu Terms Used in Newspapers
Ziauddin Ahmad Barni (1890–1969) was born and educated in Delhi, where his father and one of his brothers were instrumental in the development of Urdu newspapers and several members of the family were renowned calligraphers. Proficient in Farsi and English, he worked in the Oriental Translator’s Office in Bombay (present-day Mumbai), until his retirement in 1948. He also wrote for the Bombay Chronicle in both English and Urdu. In 1915 he published this dictionary of terminology in common usage in the Urdu newspapers of the day. Entries are ...
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Government College University Lahore
Selected Poetry of Zafar
Muntakhib Kulliyat-I Zafar is a collection of poetry by the last Mughal emperor and last ruler of the Timurid Dynasty, Muhammad Bahadur Shah II (1775–1862), generally known as Bahadar Shah Zafar. The son of Akbar Shah II, the ruler of a declining empire, Zafar was a prolific writer and a great Urdu poet. He was influenced by Sauda, Meer, and Insha, eminent Urdu poets of the 18th–early 19th centuries. Zafar was also a noted patron of contemporary poets, including Ghalib, Dagh, Shah Naseer, Momin, and Zauq. He came ...
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Government College University Lahore
Who is the Murderer?
Panchkori Dey (also seen as Babu Panch Kori Dey, 1873–1945) was a Bengali writer of detective fiction, best known for two of his characters: Arindam Bosu, a dhoti-wearing detective working in India and Europe, and Jumelia, a cunning and wicked criminal. Dey was influenced by 19th-century European writers of criminal romances, such as Wilkie Collins and Emile Gaboriau. Hatyakari Ke? (Who is the murderer?) was first published in Bengali in about 1903; the edition presented here is a later Urdu translation. The plot revolves around a father who ...
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Government College University Lahore