6 results
Storthings Bygningen, Christiania, Norway
The Storthings Byningen is the hall of the Norwegian parliament, which was completed in 1866. This photomechanical print from the Detroit Publishing Company shows how it appeared in the last decade of the 19th century. Oslo, the present-day capital of Norway, was called Christiania from 1624 to 1878 (Kristiania from 1878 to 1924). It was named after King Christian IV of Denmark, which was part of a Nordic union with Norway for more than 400 years.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Oscarshal, Christiania, Norway
According to the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark, the “château of Oscarshall was erected in the English Gothic style by Nebelong for King Oscar I in 1849-52, and adorned with paintings by eminent Norwegian artists. It was sold to the government by Charles XV, but it is still kept up as a royal residence. It deserves a visit for the sake of its pictures and the view.” This photomechanical print from the Detroit Publishing Company shows how a late 19th-century tourist would have approached ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Tourist's House, Spitzbergen, Norway
This photochrome print is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The photo depicts a tourist house on Spitsbergen Island, part of the Svalvard Archipelago, located within the Arctic Circle, some 550 kilometers north of the Norwegian mainland. There were no tourist accommodations on Spitsbergen until around 1896, when the Vesteraalens Steamship Company constructed a tourist house along the coast of Advent Bay to accommodate an influx of visitors. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Ovrelerfos, Trondhjem, Norway
This photochrome print from the “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company shows a noted tourist destination in Norway as it would have appeared in the last decade of the 19th century. The Lille (Lower) Lerfos and Store (Upper) Lerfos are picturesque waterfalls on the Nid River, several kilometers south of the city of Trondheim. The 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers advised that the best view of the falls “is from one of the windows ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
A Sami Family, Norway
This photochrome print is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The photo shows a Sami, or Lapp, family gathered by a pair of traditional conical tents called lavvu, in northern Norway. In his 1876 work Through Norway with a Knapsack, the British scientist and author William Mattieu Williams described the lavvu as "a framework of wooden ribs, all bearing towards each other in the centre," over which animal skin is stretched for insulation. The Sami, the indigenous people of northern ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
A Doll's House
Few plays have had as much influence globally on social norms and conditions as A Doll’s House by the Norwegian playwright, Henrik Ibsen (1828–1906). Considered one of the great figures of world literature, Ibsen gave theatrical art a new vitality by bringing into European bourgeois drama an ethical gravity, psychological depth, and social significance that the theater had lacked since the days of William Shakespeare. His plays portray people from the middle class of his day, whose routines are suddenly upset as they confront a deep crisis in ...
Contributed by
National Library of Norway