7 results
Sarajevo, Looking Toward Alifakovak, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print of Sarajevo is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. According to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), Sarajevo “lies in a narrow valley watered by the Miljačka, at the foot and on the slopes of hills rising to a height of 5,250 ft. The numerous minarets and the little houses standing in gardens give the town ...
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Library of Congress
Sarajevo, Bendbasi, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the village of Bendbasi, located to the east of Sarajevo. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process ...
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Library of Congress
Sarajevo, Turkenviertal, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a scene from the Turkish quarter of the city of Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to ...
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Library of Congress
Girl of Sarajevo, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire) that was part of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a girl from the Bosnian city of Sarajevo in the last decade of the century, wearing the traditional baggy trousers, or dimije, worn by women in Bosnia.
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Library of Congress
Ring Street, Budapest, Hungary, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire) that was part of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the section of Budapest that, since 1920, has been called Lujza Blaha Square, named after a popular actress. The back of the old National Theater, which was demolished in 1965 to make way for the construction of an underground metro station and tunnel, is visible on the ...
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Library of Congress
László Magyar's Travels in Southern Africa Between 1849 and 1857
László Magyar (1814-64) was a Hungarian explorer who lived for 17 years in Angola and made important contributions to the study of the geography and ethnography of equatorial Africa. He was trained as a naval officer and served in the naval forces of Austria and Argentina. In 1846, he undertook his first expedition in Africa, a voyage up the Congo River. Magyar subsequently married a daughter of the King of Bihé and used his family connections to gain access to interior regions of the continent. Accompanied by a royal guard ...
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Library of Congress
A New Depiction of the Whole of Hungary
This rare map of Hungary was produced by Matthias Zündt in 1567. Zündt (circa 1498–1572) was an engraver, sculptor, and goldsmith from Nuremberg who produced 13 copper-plate engraved maps and views between 1565 and 1571. The map originally appeared in six sheets arranged together. It shows colorful views of important cities, kingdoms, provinces, and bordering countries. Episcopal churches and Turkish religious buildings are shown, reflecting the fact that at the time one-third of the country was ruled by the Turks. Pastoral life is depicted through illustrations of cattle, shepherds ...
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University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries