15 results
Rock Painting S00176, Bethlehem, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State, South Africa
This San rock painting depicts an upside-down, plum-red antelope with a bleeding nose and, at the upper left, a smaller antelope painted in yellow, also bleeding from the nose. The upside-down posture and the nasal emanations both indicate death. For the San, this death was both literal and metaphoric. Metaphorically, death involved a shaman's passage to the Spirit World that was believed to exist behind the rock surface. The painting is from the eastern Free State of South Africa, which is noted for its depictions of upside-down antelope in ...
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Rock Painting S00501, Bethlehem, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State
This San rock painting depicts red-colored rain-animals. Among all San groups, the most important ritual is the Great Dance in which, through trances, the San say that they harness a kind of spiritual power. They use this power for healing, hunting, removing societal tensions, making rain, and other tasks. Aspects of the Great Dance are pervasive in San rock art, in part because this dance was of such great significance to the San, but more importantly because the act of making rock art seems to have been part of the ...
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Rock Painting S00568, Bethlehem, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State
This San rock painting shows rain-animals in upside-down posture, a familiar indication of death in the San culture. For the San, this death was both literal and metaphoric. Metaphorically, death involved a shaman's passage to the Spirit World that was believed to exist behind the rock surface. The painting is from the eastern Free State of South Africa, which is noted for its depictions of upside-down antelope in a variety of unusual contexts. The image of the painting is part of the Woodhouse Rock Art Collection of the Department ...
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Rock Painting S00927, Clocolan, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State
This San rock painting shows a rain-animal in plum and white colors. San communities believed that rain-animals had to be captured and slaughtered by shamans in order to bring rain. The image of the painting is part of the Woodhouse Rock Art Collection of the Department of Library Services at the University of Pretoria. The collection includes more than 23,000 slides, maps, and tracings from a large number of rock art sites in South Africa. The San are hunter-gatherer people who lived throughout southern and eastern Africa for thousands ...
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Rock Painting S01321, Ficksburg, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State
This red-and-black San rock-art image of people and a rain-animal depicts aspects of the Great Dance. Among all San groups, the most important ritual is the Great Dance in which, through trances, the San say they harness a kind of spiritual power. They use this power for healing, hunting, removing societal tensions, making rain, and other tasks. San communities also believed that rain-animals had to be captured and slaughtered by shamans in order to bring rain. The image of the painting is part of the Woodhouse Rock Art Collection of ...
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Rock Painting S01392, Ficksburg, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State
This San rock painting depicts black-and-red colored magical objects, including rain-animals, such as snakes with animal heads, which are encountered by dancers in their out-of-body vision journeys that are part of the Great Dance. Among all San groups, the most important ritual is the Great Dance in which, through trances, the San say that they harness a kind of spiritual power. They use this power for healing, hunting, removing societal tensions, making rain, and other tasks. San communities also believed that rain-animals had to be captured and slaughtered by shamans ...
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Paul Kruger Street, Pretoria, South Africa
This photograph shows Paul Kruger Street, looking south towards Pretoria Station, Pretoria, South Africa, as it appeared around 1910. The railroad station was the work of Sir Herbert Baker (1862-1946), a British-born architect who designed many important buildings in South Africa. The street was named in honor of Paul Kruger (1825-1904), the president of the South African Republic (Transvaal) who led the resistance of the Afrikaans-speaking Boers to Britain in the Boer War of 1899-1902. The photograph is from the Van der Waal Collection at the Department of Library Services ...
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Pretoria Station, South Africa, 1893
This photograph shows the arrival of the first train at Pretoria Station, Pretoria, South Africa, in 1893. Railroad construction in South Africa was spurred by economic development associated with the gold mining industry, following the discovery of gold near present-day Johannesburg in 1886. Pretoria, at the time the capital of the South African Republic, was connected by rail to Cape Town in 1893, and to Durban and Lourenço Marques (in the then-Portuguese colony of Mozambique) in 1895. The photograph is from the Van der Waal Collection at the Department of ...
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Union Buildings in Pretoria, South Africa
This photograph shows the eastern facade of the Union Buildings in Pretoria, South Africa. These buildings, 285-meters long and built from light sand stone, were designed in the English monumental style by the architect Sir Herbert Baker (1862-1946). The cornerstone was laid in November 1910, shortly after the Union of South Africa was formed. Construction was completed in 1913, at a cost of £1,310,640 for the buildings and £350,000 for the building site. The stamp on the back of the photograph reads: “Alan Yates, 240 Andries str ...
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British Troops Marching in Market Street, Pretoria
This photograph shows British troops marching on Market Street, later called Paul Kruger Street, in Pretoria, South Africa, in 1877. In 1877-78, the British Army engaged in a series of punitive expeditions against the Basuto, Zulu, and Galeka peoples that resulted in the annexation of the Transkei to the Cape Colony. The photograph is from the Van der Waal Collection at the Department of Library Services at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. The Van der Waal Collection forms part of an archive of South African architecture assembled by architectural ...
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Church Square, Pretoria, South Africa, 1905
This 1905 photograph shows Church Square in Pretoria, South Africa, looking east. The cast iron fountain, known as the Sammy Marks Fountain, was imported from Ireland by businessman Sammy Marks (1843-1920) and moved from Church Square to the city zoo in 1910. Born in Lithuania, the son of a Jewish tailor, Marks came to South Africa in 1868. He began his career by peddling jewelry and cutlery, but soon became involved in the rapidly developing gold-, diamond-, and coal-mining industries. Behind the fountain is the recently completed Tudor Chambers, then ...
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Sketches Representing the Native Tribes, Animals, and Scenery of Southern Africa: From Drawings Made by the Late Mr. Samuel Daniell
Samuel Daniell (1775–1811) was an English painter and draughtsman who arrived in South Africa in December 1799. He was appointed secretary and artist for the expedition of 1801–2 from the Cape of Good Hope to Bechuanaland led by P.J. Truter and William Somerville. On his return to England, Daniell published, with the assistance of his uncle, the painter Thomas Daniell, and his brother, the painter and engraver William Daniell, African Scenery and Animals (1804–5). He later moved to Ceylon (present-day Sri Lanka), where he made sketches ...
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Nursery Tales, Traditions, and Histories of the Zulus in their Own Words: With a Translation into English, and Notes by the Rev. Canon Callaway. Volume 1
Nursery Tales, Traditions, and Histories of the Zulus in Their Own Words is a compilation of Zulu literature gathered by the Reverend Henry Callaway (1817–90) in the Natal region of South Africa in the late 1850s and 1860s. Callaway left the United Kingdom in 1856 to become a Church of England missionary. In 1858 he settled near the Umkomanzi River in Natal and began to study the Zulu language, religious beliefs, and oral traditions. As Callaway mastered the language, he wrote down tales dictated to him by native storytellers ...
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The Gentleman Digger: Being Studies and Pictures of Life in Johannesburg
The Gentleman Digger is a fictional work set in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 1889. Following the discovery of gold in the 1880s, Johannesburg became a boomtown that attracted miners and prospectors from all over the world. The book depicts the rapid growth of the city and the squalor, glitter, drunkenness, and crime that characterized the early mining camps. The book’s author, the Comtesse de Brémont (1864–1922), was born Anna Dunphy to Irish parents in Cincinnati, Ohio. At the age of 17, she married the Comte de Brémont, a ...
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Dutch Writers from South Africa: A Cultural-Historical Study, Part I
Hollandse skrywers uit Suid-Afrika : 'n kultuur-historiese studie. Deel I (Dutch writers from South Africa: a cultural-historical study, Part I) is a compilation of works by authors of Dutch origin living in South Africa between 1652 and 1875. The book, published in 1934, traces the development of the Afrikaans language, beginning with the transplantation of Dutch culture to South Africa. Topics covered include the influence of other European countries, especially France, on the development of Afrikaans, and the output of important diarists, novelists, and journalists. Among the authors whose works are ...
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