11 results in English
Map of Baikal, a Sea, a Lake, or an Angara Gap, Located in the Irkutsk Province with All the Neighboring [Territory], Whose Mathematical Measurements were Completed and it Became Fully Known in 1806
Lake Baikal and the region around it were extensively explored by Russian expeditions in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This map shows in great detail the shoreline of the lake and the network of rivers flowing into and out of Baikal. The title of the map is shown in a cartouche. Below the title is a single-headed eagle, holding in its talons the coat of arms of Irkutsk Province. The illustration at the lower left is a view of Nikolaevsk Pier, located at the point where the Angara ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
Map of the Southern Half of Eastern Siberia and Parts of Mongolia, Manchuria, and Sakhalin: For a General Sketch of the Orography of Eastern Siberia
Orography is a branch of the science of geomorphology that deals with the disposition and character of hills and mountains. The orography of a region concerns its elevated terrain. This general sketch of the orography of eastern Siberia and adjacent areas shows hills, plateaus, lowlands, mountain ranges, and other features. Also shown are provincial and district centers, fortresses, Cossack villages, guard posts, factories and plants, mines, gold fields, monasteries, and postal and country roads.
Contributed by Russian State Library
Map of Agricultural Areas of the Siberian Region
This Soviet-era map shows the agricultural areas of Siberia, district borders, railroads, rivers, lakes, district centers, and cities. Although much of Siberia is unsuited for farming, good conditions prevail in the forest steppe region of southwestern Siberia and in parts of southern Siberia. Peasants who migrated from European Russia in the 19th century had to adjust to Siberian conditions, learning, for example, to plant their crops neither too low in the wet taiga (which risked rot) nor too high on open lands (which risked frost). By the late 19th century ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
First Nerchinsk Regiment of Zabaikal Cossack Troops
The First Nerchinsk Cossack Regiment was created in 1898 on the basis of the First Chita Regiment. In May 1899, the regiment was relocated from Chita to the Ussuriisk Region. In 1900, it was sent to Manchuria in connection with Russia’s participation in the European effort to quell the Boxer Rebellion, an uprising against foreign influence in China. The regiment later participated in the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05 before returning to Chita after a six-year absence. This book is a historical outline of the regiment’s activities in 1898-1906 ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
From Tobol'sk to Obdorsk
This album of 32 original watercolors by the Tobol'sk artist M.S. Znamenskii is from the library of Tsar Nicholas II. The album was obtained for him in 1894 for 800 rubles following the death of the artist. Znamenskii painted the watercolors over a number of years and collected them in a birch-bark covered binding under the title "From Tobol'sk to Obdorsk." The subjects include scenes from Tobol'sk, Berezov, Obdorsk (present-day Salekhard), and other localities in Tobol’sk Province; the different ethnic groups living in this region ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
We Live and Work According to Lenin: Atlas of the Novosibirsk Region
The Communist Party of the Soviet Union drew its legitimacy from the life and work of Vladimir I. Lenin, the leading figure of the Russian Revolution and the founder of the Soviet state. This late Soviet-era atlas of the Siberian region of Novosibirsk contains, in addition to its 32 maps, sections on V. I. Lenin and Siberia, the establishment of Soviet power in Novosibirsk, and the participation of the region in the Great Patriotic War (World War II), as well as descriptions of the industrial, agricultural, educational, and cultural achievements ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
Strolls Around Tobol'sk in 1830
Tobol'sk was founded by the Cossack Danila Chulkov in 1587 on the site of a Tatar town. It is considered the father of Siberian cities. Thanks to its position on the Great Siberian Post Road, Tobol'sk became the main administrative point for all of Siberia. Until 1824 it was the seat of government for Western Siberia. This book offers a portrait of the city during the first third of the 19th century through the eyes of one of its residents. The end of the book contains a set ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
Siberia and Migrants
In the 19th century, the government of Russia encouraged peasants to move from the western parts of the empire to untilled lands in Siberia. This book was intended as a guide for peasants interested in resettling. It contained information about the climate and soils of Siberia, conditions and economic opportunities, essential expenses for relocation and construction in a new place, as well as recommendations for the behavior of migrants in transit. The book was published in Khar'kov (Kharkiv, in Ukrainian) by the Khar’kov Society for the Expansion of ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
Economic Map of Yakutsk Oblast
This Soviet-era economic map of the Yakut Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic is from an atlas, Yakutia ASSR: Atlas, Socialist Yakutia. It shows six different economic regions in this vast region of Siberia. Depicted on the map are centers for the production of machinery, electricity, and foodstuffs, and for extractive industries producing coal, natural gas, gold, mica, salt, building materials, and diamonds. The development of the mining industry in Yakutia, which started in the 1960s, brought an influx of migrants from European Russia and the other Slavic republics of the Soviet ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
General Map of Irkutsk Province, Self-Compiled in Irkutsk, Yakutsk, and Udinsk Provinces
This multi-colored, hand-colored map of eastern Siberia shows the state of geographic knowledge at the beginning of the last quarter of the 18th century. The geographic grid and the mapping of the rivers are well-executed. Sakhalin Island is shown, but is poorly mapped. The work is by Johann Treskot (1721-86), a cartographer at the Geographical Department of the Academy of Sciences in Saint Petersburg, who compiled many of the maps published by the academy from the 1740s to the 1780s.
Contributed by Russian State Library
Geognostic Map of the Localities of Irkutsk, Verkholensk, and Balagansk Districts
The first geological (geognostic) maps in Russia were produced in the 1850s. This map of the Irkutsk region was published by the Siberian Department of the Imperial Russian Geographic Society under the leadership of Academician F.B. Schmidt. It shows the location of mines and minerals, caves, gaps, salt deposits, springs, landslides, and patterns of freezing on Lake Baikal. The colors denote different types of rock.
Contributed by Russian State Library