Narrow results:

Place

Time Period

Topic

Additional Subjects

Type of Item

Language

Institution

35 results
The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
View 74 more issues
The Bunyoro Agreement 1955
This document, from the National Archives of Uganda, is the original of the Bunyoro Agreement of 1955 between Great Britain and the Kingdom of Bunyoro-Kitara, one of the traditional kingdoms of Uganda. The agreement, in both English and Lunyoro, was signed on September 3 by Sir Andrew Cohen (1909–68), governor of the Uganda Protectorate, on behalf of the British government in London and the government of the protectorate, and the Omukama (king), Sir Tito Gafabusa Winyi IV (1883–1971), on behalf of himself and his successors, the Rukurato (the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
Report of the Constitutional Committee 1959
This four-part report was prepared in 1959 by a constitutional committee established by Sir Frederick Crawford, Governor of Uganda, as the then-protectorate of Uganda prepared for independence from Great Britain. The committee was chaired by John Wild, and included two other Europeans, two Asians, and ten Africans. It was “to consider, and to recommend to the Governor, the form of direct elections on a common roll for the representative members of the Legislative Council to be introduced in 1961, the number of seats to be filled under the above system ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
The Wonderful Story of Uganda. To Which is Added the Story of Ham Mukasa, Told by Himself
The Wonderful Story of Uganda by the Reverend Joseph Dennis (J.D.) Mullins is an account of the mission to Uganda undertaken in the 1870s by the London-based Church Missionary Society (CMS) and the spread of Christianity in Uganda in the following decades. Mullins characterized the mission as “a Christian miracle of modern days. A nation situated in Central Africa, which twenty-five years ago had not received the Gospel, and had not even a written language, is to-day the home of thirty thousand Christians under Christian chiefs; its language has ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
The Mailo System in Buganda: A Preliminary Case Study in African Land Tenure
The basic unit of the mailo system is a square mile, hence the derivation of mailo, which is also equivalent to 640 acres. The term is used in Uganda to describe a land tenure system that came into effect when the kingdom of Buganda signed an agreement with the British-administered Uganda Protectorate there in 1900. Buganda runs along the northwest shore of Lake Victoria, in present-day south-central Uganda. This work is by Henry W. West, who was assistant commissioner for lands and surveys in the early 1960s and the foremost ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
The Lango: A Nilotic Tribe of Uganda
This 1923 study of the Lango people of north-central Uganda narrates the origins and history of the group, which had a form of government based on minor clan chiefs, rather than a king or superior chief, before the arrival of the British rule. Jack Herbert Driberg (1888–1946) was a British official in the service of the Uganda Protectorate in 1912–21 and lived and worked among the Lango, for whom he had both sympathy and admiration. He describes the ethnology of the Lango nation; their environment, including the fauna ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
Through the Dark Continent
Henry Morton Stanley (1841–1904) was born at Denbigh in North Wales, the illegitimate son of John Rowlands and Elisabeth Parry. His original name was John Rowlands. Abandoned by his mother, he spent his earliest years in the custody of relations but was then raised in the grim conditions of a workhouse. At age 17, he made his way to New Orleans, where he worked for a cotton broker and took on his new name. With the outbreak of the American Civil War, he enlisted in the Confederate Army, was ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
Uganda in Transformation: 1876–1926
Herbert Gresford Jones (1870–1958) was an Anglican cleric and missionary to Uganda. He studied at Cambridge University and was ordained in 1895. After serving as a vicar at churches in England and as a chaplain with the British forces in World War I, he went to Uganda in 1920, where he was bishop suffragan of Kampala until 1923. Uganda in Transformation: 1876–1926 is Jones’s account of the development of the Anglican Church in Uganda since the arrival of the first British missionaries in 1877. In a series ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
Uganda by Pen and Camera
Charles William Hattersley (1866–1934) was a British missionary who joined the Church Missionary Society in early 1897 after having managed a cutlery works in Sheffield. In September of that year he left England for Uganda, where he helped to set up the system of primary education, was involved in educating the sons of Ugandan chiefs, and eventually served as headmaster of the Church Missionary Society school on Mengo Hill in Kampala. An enthusiastic amateur photographer, Hattersley became the official photographer to the Ugandan court and the church. His Uganda ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
Uganda's White Man of Work: A Story of Alexander M. Mackay
Uganda's White Man of Work: A Story of Alexander M. Mackay is a children’s biography of Alexander Murdoch Mackay (1849–90), a pioneering missionary to Uganda. In 1876 Mackay answered a call of the Church Missionary Society to go to Uganda after King Mutesa I of Buganda told the explorer Henry Morton Stanley of his interest in receiving Christian missionaries. Mackay spent nearly 14 years in Uganda. In addition to teaching the Christian gospel, he worked as a farmer, carpenter, bridge and road builder, schoolmaster, printer, and translator ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
A. M. Mackay: Pioneer Missionary of the Church Missionary Society to Uganda
Alexander Murdoch Mackay (1849–90) was a pioneering missionary to Uganda. The son of a Free Church of Scotland minister, he studied engineering in Edinburgh and Berlin. In 1876 Mackay answered a call of the Church Missionary Society to go to Uganda, where King Mutesa I of Buganda (reigned, 1856–84) had expressed an interest in receiving Christian missionaries. In November 1878 Mackay arrived in Uganda, where he spent nearly 14 years, never once returning to his native Scotland. He translated the Gospel of Matthew into Luganda and applied his ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
The Buganda Agreement, 1955
By the late 19th century, Buganda was a powerful East African kingdom, running along the northwest shore of Lake Victoria, in present-day south-central Uganda.  The Buganda Agreement of 1900, which gave Buganda a large degree of internal autonomy within the British-ruled Uganda Protectorate, was modified by this 1955 treaty. The Buganda Agreement, 1955 was made on October 18 of that year, between Sir Andrew Cohen, Governor and Commander in Chief of the Uganda Protectorate, on behalf of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
The Ankole Agreement, 1962
The Ankole Agreement of 1901 consolidated Nkore and other states into the kingdom of Ankole, under the auspices of Britain’s Uganda Protectorate. The treaty was amended by further agreements between the governor of Uganda and the omugabe (king) of Ankole until this 1962 agreement. The Ankole Agreement, 1962 was made on August 30, 1962: “between Sir Walter Fleming Coutts, Knight Commander of the Most distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Governor and Commander in Chief of the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
In Uganda for Christ: The Life Story of the Rev. John Samuel Callis B.A., of the Church Missionary Society
In Uganda for Christ is a biography of the Reverend John Samuel Callis (1870–97), an early Christian missionary to Uganda. Callis was born in England and graduated from Saint Catharine’s College, Cambridge. Moved by the death of his eldest sister, he decided to dedicate his life to the church. After studying theology and working among the poor in London, he was ordained an Anglican priest on May 28, 1893. He served three years as curate outside London and then offered himself to the Church Missionary Society for the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
Central Africa: Naked Truths of Naked People
Charles Chaillé-Long (1842–1917) was an American from the state of Maryland who enlisted as a private in the Union Army in the Civil War, fought in the Battle of Gettysburg, and rose to the rank of captain. In 1870 he was one of the approximately 50 former Union and Confederate officers recruited to assist the khedive of Egypt in developing a national army. He became chief of staff to General Charles (“Chinese”) Gordon when Gordon was governor of Equatoria Province in Sudan. In that capacity, in April 1874 Chaillé-Long ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
The Church in Uganda: A Charge to the Missionaries of the Uganda Mission, 1913
The Church in Uganda: A Charge to the Missionaries of the Uganda Mission, 1913 contains the text of a document by J.J. Willis, bishop of Uganda, addressed to the Anglican missionaries in Uganda on the eve of the 1913 meeting of the Uganda synod. The document has two parts: the first is an overview of the situation of the church in Uganda and of the work done in the previous year; the second part deals with problems encountered by the Uganda mission in the field. The report on the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
In Memoriam. An Address, on the Occasion of the Service in Memory of Queen Victoria, February 2, 1901
“In Memoriam” is an address delivered by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914), bishop of Uganda, in the Cathedral Church of Saint Paul, Mengo, Uganda, on February 2, 1901, on the occasion of the service in memory of Queen Victoria, who had died on January 22. Tucker thanked God for Victoria’s “life and noble example,” her “wise and sympathetic rule,” and “that high and holy courage with which she bore the burdens of state.” Victoria’s reign, he concluded, “will stand out as the brightest and most glorious page in ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
An Address in Memory of King Edward VII, May 20, 1910
This document is an address delivered by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914), bishop of Uganda, in the Cathedral Church of Saint Paul, Mengo, Uganda, on May 20, 1910, on the occasion of the service in memory of King Edward VII, who had died on May 6. Edward was born in 1841, and became king of Great Britain and Ireland in 1901, following the death of his mother, Queen Victoria. Tucker characterized Edward as “a Sovereign whose name I venture to think will go down to posterity as ‘Edward the Peacemaker ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
Duty of the Church to the Empire and the World: Especially to Africa
Duty of the Church to the Empire and the World: Especially to Africa is a report to an Anglican Church congress by the Reverend Alfred R. Tucker (1849-1914), who had served as the first bishop of Uganda from 1899 to 1911. Tucker made three main points: the work of evangelism in Africa should be assumed, to the greatest possible extent, by native Africans; church government should be based on African national or tribal methods; and education in the vernacular—in the local languages—was a great duty of the church ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
In Memoriam: Bishop Alfred Robert Tucker, June 19, 1914
“In Memoriam,” is the program for the Eucharist and burial service for Bishop Alfred R. Tucker in Durham Cathedral, in northern England, on June 19, 1914, following Tucker’s death on June 15. Tucker was born in Woolwich, United Kingdom, on April 1, 1849. He studied art, and at the age of 25 exhibited his paintings at the Royal Academy. He entered Oxford University as an undergraduate in 1878 and graduated in 1882, the same year in which he was ordained a deacon in Gloucester Cathedral. In 1890 he wrote ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
Policy of the Uganda Mission
Policy of the Uganda Mission is the report by J.J. Willis (1872–1954) that he presented to an Anglican Church congress in July 1912, the same year that he became the second bishop of Uganda, succeeding Alfred R. Tucker. The report begins with an overview of the area, population, and the church’s missionary policy in the six provinces of the Diocese of Uganda. This is followed by sections on church organization, education, discipline, finance, and the role, both positive and in some respects problematic, of European settlers in ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda