4 results in English
Thesis on the Mirror of the Hearts
Khodzha Akhmed Iassavi (died 1166) was a philosopher, Sufi mystic, and the earliest known poet to write in a Turkic dialect. He was born in the city of Isfijab (present-day Sayram, in Kazakhstan) but lived most of his life in Turkestan (also in southern Kazakhstan). He was a student of Arslan Baba, a well-known preacher of Islam. At a time when Farsi dominated literature and public life, Iassavi wrote in his native Old Turkic (Chagatai) language. He was known during his lifetime as a holy person and people from all ...
The Genealogy of Khodzha Akhmed Iassavi
Nasab-nama (The genealogy of Khodzha Akhmed Iassavi) is considered to be the only written document in Kazakhstan confirming the family tree of Khodzha Akhmed Iassavi (died 1166), a philosopher, Sufi mystic, and the earliest known poet to write in a Turkish dialect. The author was Ibrakhim ibn Makhmud, the father of Khodzha Akhmed Iassavi and a well-known sheikh in Isfijab (present-day Sayram, in Kazakhstan), the city where Khodzha Akhmed Iassavi was born. Khodzha Akhmed Iassavi was known during his lifetime as a holy person and people from all parts of ...
Verses of the Kazakh Poet Abai Ibrahim Kunanbayev
Kazakhstan had a strong oral tradition in literature until the mid-19th century. Abai (Ibrahim) Kunanbayev (1845–1904) was a Kazakh poet and teacher, and the key figure in developing a new Kazakh national written literature. His father, Kunanbai Uskenbayev, was a landowner, and the family was prominent in eastern Kazakhstan. Abai studied at the madrassa led by Mullah Akhmet Riza in Semipalatinsk and also attended a Russian school. He spoke Arabic, Persian, and other Eastern languages. Abai Kunanbayev also translated into Kazakh works by major European and Russian poets, such ...
Map of the Khanates of Bukhara, Khiva, and Khokand and Part of Russian Turkistan
The Emirate of Bukhara and the khanates of Khiva and Kokand were independent states that came under Russian imperial control in the 1860s and 1870s. Russian Turkestan was a governor-generalship of the Russian Empire established in 1867, two years after the start of the Russian conquest of the region of Central Asia known as Turkestan. This map of these territories, comprising parts of present-day Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, was made by Eugene Schuyler (1840–90), an American diplomat, explorer, author, and scholar who was one of the first foreigners ...