20 results in English
General Geography in Brief for the Whole World
Published in 1843 with the support of many private donors, General Geography in Brief for the Whole World is a reworking in Bulgarian of Samuel Goodrich’s American textbook, Peter Parley's Method of Telling about Geography to Children, but from the Greek translation produced by American missionaries rather than the original English. Other Greek-language geography texts also inspired aspects of this work, notably William Channing Woodbridge’s Rudiments of Geography (1835), which was translated into Greek by missionaries at about the same time as Goodrich’s text. When American ...
Bulgarian Grammar
Notable as the first Bulgarian grammar, this book is also culturally significant because of the role that its author, Neofit Rilski (1793–1881), played in the promotion of secular education in Bulgaria and in the establishment of a modern Bulgarian literary language. Neofit, a priest associated with the Rila Monastery, was a leading figure in the 19th-century Bulgarian National Revival and its concomitant education reform. He was the first headmaster of the Gabrovo School, the first secular school in Bulgaria. In the midst of a national debate in the 1830s ...
Something for the Unlearned
Most famous for being the father of Bulgarian revolutionary Khristo Botev, Botio Petkov (1815–69) was an accomplished educator and writer in his own right. Among his students were the luminaries Ivan Vazov and Nikola Nachov. Born in the town of Karlovo, Petkov himself studied with a famous teacher, Raino Popovich. Petkov wrote for the early Bulgarian newspaper Tsarigradski vestnik (Constantinople Herald), and published several translations into Bulgarian from Russian, including this book. Petkov completed this translation while he was a seminary student in Odessa, a city in Russia (present-day ...
Universal Geography for Children
Geography textbooks were very popular as basic education tools during the 19th-century National Revival in Bulgaria. Between 1824 and 1878, some 43 different titles or editions of this genre were published. Universal Geography for Children by Ivan Bogorov, or Bogoev (1818–92), appeared early in this tradition. Bogorov’s book was a translation from the Russian of a work, also entitled Universal Geography, by Vasilii Bardovskii (1804–74), a teacher of geography at a gymnasium in St. Petersburg and the author of several popular Russian geography textbooks. Bogorov’s Mathematical ...
Book of Kings or a Bulgarian History, Which Teaches from Whence Came the Bulgarians, How They Became Rulers, How They Reigned and How Their Kingdom Perished and Fell under the Yoke
This book is the first published edition of Paisii Khilendarski’s 1762 Slaveno-Bulgarian History, which is considered the founding document of the Bulgarian National Revival. Paisii’s history encouraged the Bulgarians, who had been under Ottoman rule for centuries, to discover their national consciousness and to embrace the Bulgarian language. The work was so influential that it was copied by hand and excerpted many times, without Paisii being identified as the author or his name associated with the work. This 1844 edition, compiled and revised by Khristaki Pavlovich, also fails ...
Bulgarian Dream Interpreter, Printed for the Curiosity of Readers
Published in 1844, Bulgarian Dream Interpreter is an early Bulgarian astrological publication, part of a Balkan tradition of apocryphal and astrological works. It was intended to assist readers in interpreting their dreams by providing an alphabetical list of dreams and interpretations. The work is anonymous, but the publisher was Zaharia Carcalechi, a noted Bucharest journalist and publisher who produced works mainly in Romanian, but who also published 12 Bulgarian-language books in the period between 1840 and 1850.
Bulgarian Phrasebook for Those Who Would Like to Speak Greek
Bulgarian Phrasebook for Those Who Would Like to Speak Greek is an 1845 phrasebook and manual for writing business letters in Greek for use by Bulgarians. It was not the first such business aid published in Bulgarian, but it is significant because of the importance of its author, Konstantin Fotinov (circa 1790–1858), a Bulgarian educator and editor of the first Bulgarian periodical, Liuboslovie (Philology). Fotinov recognized that in order to compete with the Greeks in the area of commerce, Bulgarians needed to be conversant in Greek, which was widely ...
Bulgarian Arithmetic
Arithmetics were a popular genre of textbooks during the era of the Bulgarian National Revival in the 19th century, when it was widely believed that everyone, especially future businessmen, needed to know basic mathematics. Bulgarian Arithmetic was the fourth such text published in this era, in 1845. The author, Khristodul Kostovich Sichan-Nikolov (1808–89), was a monk, teacher, writer, and publicist, often assisted in his scholarly pursuits by the writer, educator, and priest Neofit Rilski. Before writing his own text, Sichan-Nikolov had been involved as the editor of the first ...
Book of Amusements for 1846
Book of Amusements for 1846 was the second in a series that began publication the previous year, in 1845. The anthologist, Konstantin Ognianovich (1798–1858), was a Serb who believed in education for Bulgarians and who contributed to the Bulgarian National Revival by producing poetic works and popular anthologies that encouraged reading and Bulgarian national pride. Part of the tradition of calendar publishing, the volumes in the series led the transformation of the genre from an earlier focus on light content to the production of popular anthologies with serious content ...
Brief Interpretation of the Holy Church, and How Many Holy Vessels and Vestments are Kept There, and of the Everyday Services, of the Divine Liturgy, and of the Holy Church Mysteries
Brief Interpretation of the Holy Church, and How Many Holy Vessels and Vestments Are Kept There, and of the Everyday Services, of the Divine Liturgy, and of the Holy Church Mysteries is a Bulgarian translation of a liturgical work originally written in Greek. Shown here is the second edition. In 1837, when the first edition of this work was published, very few Bulgarian books existed for educational or even religious purposes. The Greek original is by the Hellenistic educator, Demetrios Nikolaos Darvares (1757–1853); the translation is by Raino Popovich ...
Grammar of the Slavic Language
Ivan N. Momchilov was a noted teacher and textbook writer during the 19th-century era of the Bulgarian National Revival. As a teacher, he recognized the need for a basic primer for his pupils on Church Slavic, and set about writing such a work. His 1847 Grammar of the Slavic Language was Momchilov’s first textbook and the first Church Slavic grammar to be published in Bulgarian and by a Bulgarian. It was compiled using several other grammars as its foundation, namely those by the Russian Ivan Stepanovich Peninskii, by the ...
New Testament of Our Lord Jesus Christ
The noted educational reformer, grammarian, and priest Neofit Rilski (1793–1881) was the first to translate the New Testament into modern Bulgarian. Rilski’s translation was critical to religious education, as most Bulgarians could not understand the existing translations of the Bible into Church Slavic. Financed by the Protestant British and Foreign Bible Society and sanctioned by the head of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, Ilarion, Metropolitan of Tŭrnovo, the translation was a milestone in the Bulgarian National Revival and in the efforts of Bulgarians to achieve religious autonomy from the ...
Aesop’s Fables
Aesop’s Fables are a favorite for the instruction of children the world over. The first published Bulgarian translations of the fables were found in Petur Beron's Primer with Various Instructions of 1824, commonly known as the Fish Primer. The first separate publication devoted just to Aesop’s tales is this 1852 compilation by Petko Slaveikov (1827–95), a noted poet, publicist, translator, folklorist, and leader in the Bulgarian enlightenment. Slaveikov translated the fables in a literary fashion and with a strong Bulgarian flavor. The book is not illustrated ...
Writing Manual
Sava Dobroplodni (1820–94) was a noted educator, dramatist, and literary figure during the era of the National Revival in Bulgaria. In his role as an educator, he wrote many textbooks, including this pismennik (writing manual). Published in 1853, Dobroplodni’s guide was one of the earliest Bulgarian manuals of writing, or orthography, as well as the first to provide definitions of such literary terms as metaphor, synonym, and allegory. The book showed the Slavic, Greek, German, and French alphabets, offered rules for writing, and gave examples of good writing ...
Bulgarian Folk Songs
Naiden Gerov (1823–1900) was a renowned Bulgarian literary figure, whose accomplishments included composing the first poem in modern Bulgarian. His most important work was his Dictionary of the Bulgarian Language, which he worked on for many decades and which was published in five volumes between 1895 and 1904. Gerov’s lifelong interest in Bulgarian folklore is reflected in his monumental dictionary, in which he included many words from folk materials. Although he gathered much material, most of it was not published during his lifetime. This small anthology, Bulgarian Folk ...
Brief Anthropology, or the Science of Man
Naiden P. Stoianov (1830–76) was the author of several Bulgarian textbooks, but he is better known as one of the leaders of the uprising by the Bulgarians against Ottoman rule in April 1876. Also known as the Koprivshtitsa uprising after one of the towns in which the insurrection was centered, the April uprising was brutally crushed by the Ottomans. Stoianov died in prison after being tortured. He was a student of both Neofit Rilski and Naiden Gerov, leading writers and luminaries in the Bulgarian National Revival of the 19th ...
The Forest Traveler
Georgi Rakovski (1821–67) was an important Bulgarian revolutionary and writer who was one of the leaders in the Bulgarian struggle against Ottoman rule. He lived a life of constant intrigue against the Ottomans, which at times included spying, imprisonment, escape from captivity, organizing rebellions, and surviving a sentence of death that was not carried out. Rakovski published several newspapers and wrote many works intended to inspire the Bulgarian people, including The Forest Traveler, one of the most famous ideological works of Bulgarian literature. Written while Rakovski was in hiding ...
Humorous Calendar for the New Year
Petko Rachov Slaveikov (1827–95) was one of the most renowned Bulgarian literary figures of the 19th century. He was a poet, publicist, translator, editor, dramatist, and folklorist. He believed fervently in the ideals of the National Revival movement and many of his works reflect his aspirations for the education of the Bulgarian people and for political and religious independence from the Ottoman Turks. Some of Slaveikov’s most popular works were his humorous calendars, which contained a variety of writing styles, including poems, amusing sketches, and horoscopes. These calendars ...
Bulgarian Folk Songs
Bulgarian Folk Songs is the most important National Revival-era compilation of Bulgarian folk material. Gathered and edited by Dimitrii Miladinov (1810–62) and his brother Konstantin (1830–62), the work contains folk songs, riddles, games, and proverbs from both the western and eastern parts of Bulgaria. The Miladinovs were born in Struga (in present-day Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia) in what was then the Ottoman Empire. With its 665 songs, Bulgarian Folk Songs had a strong influence on Bulgarian literature and culture as well as on the development of Slavic ...
Bulgarian Folk Calendar for Leap Year 1868
Bulgarian Folk Calendar for Leap Year 1868 is one of a number of popular folk calendars produced by En’o Kŭrpachev (1833–1916), a publisher in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul), during the National Revival era in Bulgaria. The first published Bulgarian calendar appeared in 1818. Over 100 of them were published during the National Revival era alone. The wave of popularity for Bulgarian calendars began in the 1840s and continued long past the end of the Revival period. Calendars were a popular genre of reading material in the 19th century, and ...