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History of Byzantium
This Greek manuscript on parchment dating from the 12th to the 13th centuries is one of the most valuable codices in the National Library of Spain, treasured for the richness of its illumination. The work, by Ioannes Scylitza (flourished 1081), is a history of the Byzantine emperors from 811 to 1057, covering events from the proclamation of Michael I Rangabe in 811 to the reign of Michael VI in 1056–57. The manuscript contains 577 miniatures by different artists. Most of the scenes are accompanied by a caption that explains ...
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National Library of Spain
Priest Puncho Miscellany of 1796
This intriguing manuscript was written in the vernacular Bulgarian of the late 18th century and was intended to be printed. The content of the manuscript consists of literary texts compiled from older manuscripts, Russian printed books, apocrypha, a reworked version of the first real Bulgarian chronicle, Paisiĭ Khilendarski’s Istoriia slavianobolgarskaia (Slaveno-Bulgarian history), as well as texts of unspecified or unknown origin. The illumination, although stylistically naive, is very rich. It includes two self-portraits of the scribe and compiler Puncho, together with numerous miniatures, some of them with unusual iconography ...
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National Library of Bulgaria
Bashkioi Copy of “Slaveno-Bulgarian History”
This handwritten copy of Paisiĭ Khilendarski’s Istoriia slavianobolgarskaia (Slaveno-Bulgarian history) was made in 1841 by the priest Vasilii Manuilov. In addition to the main text, the manuscript contains accounts of two miracles of the Holy Mother. First published in 1762, Paisiĭ’s history encouraged the Bulgarians, who had been under Ottoman rule for centuries, to discover their national consciousness and to embrace the Bulgarian language. The work was so influential that it was copied by hand and excerpted many times without Paisiĭ being identified as the author or his ...
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National Library of Bulgaria
Serbia
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Serbia is Number 20 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Serbia was a powerful medieval kingdom conquered by the Ottoman Turks in 1459. The Serbs regained their independence in the ...
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Library of Congress
Greece with the Cyclades and Northern Sporades
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Greece with the Cyclades & Northern Sporades is Number 18 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. The book covers physical and political geography, political history, social and political conditions, and economic ...
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Library of Congress
Holland
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Holland is Number 25 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Holland, or the Kingdom of the Netherlands as it was formally known, remained neutral during the war. The book covers ...
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Library of Congress
Albania
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Albania is Number 17 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Albania was conquered by the Ottomans in the middle of the 15th century and did not achieve full independence from ...
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Library of Congress
Belgium
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Belgium is Number 26 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. The book covers physical and political geography, political history, social and political conditions, and economic conditions. The section on geography ...
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Library of Congress
Bulgaria
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Bulgaria is Number 22 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Bulgaria was a powerful medieval kingdom that came under the control of the Ottoman Turks in the 14th century. The ...
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Library of Congress
Young Albania
This photograph of two small Albanian boys in picturesque costumes, wearing shoes with pointed, up-turned toes, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs ...
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Library of Congress
Across Iceland
This book is an account of a journey across central Iceland, from the northeast to the southwest, made in the summer of 1900 by a party of five men and one woman. The author and expedition leader, William Bisiker, was an English geographer associated with the Oxford School of Geography. The group included Arthur W. Hill, a noted botanist and later director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and the geologist Herbert H. Thomas, later a noted paleobiologist and archaeologist. In addition to the overland journey, the book recounts a ...
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Library of Congress
Album of a Journey through Southern Russia and the Crimea, by Way of Hungary, Wallachia, and Moldova
This four-volume work documents the expedition undertaken in 1837 by the Russian industrialist and philanthropist Anatolii Demidov (1812-70) through southeastern Europe and the southern parts of the Russian Empire. Demidov was accompanied by a team of French scientists, engineers, and artists. The expedition gathered a wealth of information about the geography, history, archaeology, and peoples and cultures of a region still largely unknown to the rest of the world. Denis Auguste Marie Raffet (1804-60), the staff artist of the expedition, produced 64 lithographed plates for the volumes, along with many ...
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Library of Congress
Bulgarian Haiduts
Georgi Stoikov Rakovski (1821-67) was a famous Bulgarian revolutionary who drew inspiration from the haiduts, the traditional bandits who lived in the mountains of Bulgaria and robbed from the Ottomans. He intended to write a larger history of the haiduts in Bulgaria, but was able to send his publisher only the 39 pages that comprise Book I before he died of tuberculosis at the age of 46.
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Library of Congress
Fiume, the Corso, Croatia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late 19th-century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire) that was part of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the famous Corso, or promenade, in Fiume, as the present-day city of Rijeka, Croatia, was known at the time. The city, which dates to Roman times, was part of Austria-Hungary before World War I and was populated by both Croats and ethnic Italians. It became an object ...
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Library of Congress
Charter Given by the High and Mighty Lords of the States General on the Date of June the Third, 1621
On June 3, 1621, the States-General, the governing body of the United Provinces of the Netherlands, issued a charter to a group of Dutch merchants to establish the Dutch West India Company. Similar to the Dutch East India Company, which was founded in 1602 in order to promote trade with Asia, the West India Company was granted a 24-year monopoly on all trade by Dutch merchants and inhabitants in a region that included the Americas and West Africa. The text of the charter, published in this 1623 pamphlet, contained 45 ...
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National Library of the Netherlands
Book of Kings or a Bulgarian History, Which Teaches from Whence Came the Bulgarians, How They Became Rulers, How They Reigned and How Their Kingdom Perished and Fell under the Yoke
This book is the first published edition of Paisii Khilendarski’s 1762 Slaveno-Bulgarian History, which is considered the founding document of the Bulgarian National Revival. Paisii’s history encouraged the Bulgarians, who had been under Ottoman rule for centuries, to discover their national consciousness and to embrace the Bulgarian language. The work was so influential that it was copied by hand and excerpted many times, without Paisii being identified as the author or his name associated with the work. This 1844 edition, compiled and revised by Khristaki Pavlovich, also fails ...
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Central Library of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
Baker Standing in Front of the "American Bakery," Ortaköy, Istanbul, Turkey
This photograph of an unusual bakery in Istanbul, Turkey, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives ...
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Library of Congress
Lake Lucerne
This panoramic photograph shows Lake Lucerne, Switzerland, as it appeared in the early 20th century. Panoramic photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. This view is comprised of three photographs spliced together to provide a broader image than would be possible with a single photograph. The Boston office of the Notman Photo Co. copyrighted the photograph in 1909. The Notman firm was founded by William Notman (1826-1891), a Scottish-born Canadian photographer who opened a studio in Montreal in 1856. Notman eventually became the largest ...
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Library of Congress
The Roumanian Question: The Roumanians and their Lands
Romania was formed in 1861 by the union of the provinces of Moldavia and Wallachia, which had been ruled by the Ottoman Turks for centuries. At the 1878 Congress of Berlin, the major European powers recognized the full independence of Romania. In World War I, Romania fought on the side of France, Britain, and the other Allied powers against Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Bulgaria, chiefly with the aim of gaining territories traditionally inhabited by ethnic Romanians but under the control of Austria-Hungary and other neighboring countries. Published in Pittsburgh in 1919 ...
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Library of Congress
Slavonia, Croatia, Bosnia, and a part of Dalmatia
Gerard Mercator’s 1590 Sclavonia, Croatia, Bosnia cum Dalmatiae parte (Slavonia, Croatia, Bosnia, and a part of Dalmatia) is the best representation of Bosnia made up to that time. One of the oldest items in the cartographic collections of the National and University Library of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the map was published by the well-known Blaeu firm in Amsterdam. Shown are villages, towns, rivers, and mountains. The scale is in German miles. The map is in Latin, but it gives place names in the languages of the region, which include ...
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National and University Library of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Bosnia and Herzegovina is Number 12 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Bosnia was conquered by the Turks in 1463, Herzegovina in 1483. As the power of the Ottoman Empire ...
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Library of Congress