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30 results
Mirror of the Saxons
More than 400 manuscripts of the Sachsenspiegel (Mirror of the Saxons) survive, attesting to the wide dissemination and influence on the whole of Europe of this first law book in German. The most beautiful copies are the four illuminated manuscripts, all produced between 1295 and 1371, and now held in Heidelberg, Oldenburg, Dresden, and Wolfenbüttel. The most artistically valuable of these documents is the Dresden manuscript, preserved in the Saxon State and University Library. Its 924 image sequences on 92 pages are the most extensive of those in the four ...
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Saxon State and University Library, Dresden
Manifesto to the Czechoslovak People in America
In World War I, all sides used posters as tools to mobilize their populations for the war effort. “'Manifest k Ceskoslovenskému lidu v Americe!" (Manifesto to the Czechoslovak people in America) is one of a series of posters created by Vojtech Preissig (1873-1944) that encouraged Czech and Slovak volunteers to fight with the Czechoslovak Legion against Austria-Hungary and Germany to further the cause of an independent Czechoslovakia. Preissig was a Czech artist living in the United States. The poster was designed and printed at the Wentworth Institute in Boston and ...
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Library of Congress
Devin and the Danube River, Southwest Slovakia, near Austrian Border, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late 19th-century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire) that was part of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts Devín Castle, located on a bluff in southwestern Slovakia, at the confluence of the Morava and Danube rivers. The castle was an important military fortress of Great Moravia, a Slavic state that in the first half of the 8th century covered parts of present-day Moravia, western Slovakia ...
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Library of Congress
Entrance to Castle, Prague, Bohemia, Austro-Hungary
Prague Castle is the largest medieval castle complex in Europe and the historic seat of kings, emperors, and presidents going back to the ninth century. This photochrome print shows the castle as it appeared in the last decade of the 19th century. In addition to the castle itself, the complex includes St. Vitus’ Cathedral, several palaces, a monastery, Golden Lane (once home to writer Franz Kafka), and St. George’s Basilica.
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Library of Congress
Museum, Prague, Bohemia, Austro-Hungary
The National Museum of what is now the Czech Republic was founded in 1818 by Count Kašpar Maria Sternberg (1761-1838), an early scholar in the field of paleontology. The museum’s collections include millions of objects in the fields of natural history, history, art, and music. The main building, pictured here, was completed in 1891. It is located at the upper end of Wenceslas Square, one of the main squares in the city of Prague. The square is named for Saint Wenceslas, the patron saint of Bohemia.
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Library of Congress
Radetzky Memorial, Prague, Bohemia, Austro-Hungary
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows the bronze monument to Field Marshal Radetzky, who stands on a shield borne by eight soldiers, holding his baton and a flag. Joseph, Count Radetzky (1766-1858), was a soldier of Czech origin who led many victorious campaigns in the service of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The monument was erected in 1858, the year of Radetzky’s death. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in ...
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Library of Congress
Jajce, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the town of Jajce, which, according to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), is “an old town picturesquely situated on the left bank of the Vrbas, on the slope of Gola Planina.” Shown here is the “superb Waterfall of the Pliva, which is precipitated from the Lake of ...
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Library of Congress
Sarajevo, Looking Toward Alifakovak, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print of Sarajevo is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. According to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), Sarajevo “lies in a narrow valley watered by the Miljačka, at the foot and on the slopes of hills rising to a height of 5,250 ft. The numerous minarets and the little houses standing in gardens give the town ...
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Library of Congress
Sarajevo, Bendbasi, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the village of Bendbasi, located to the east of Sarajevo. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process ...
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Library of Congress
Sarajevo, Turkenviertal, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a scene from the Turkish quarter of the city of Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to ...
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Library of Congress
Three Men in Field with Stacks of Grain, Hungary
This photograph, taken in Hungary in 1923, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. At the ...
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Library of Congress
Warsaw - Place Krasinski
This photograph of Warsaw is from the George Grantham Bain Collection at the Library of Congress. The collection contains approximately 40,000 glass plate negatives and 50,000 photographic prints, most dating from the 1900s to the mid-1920s. Bain, who was born in 1865 and died in 1944, founded the New York-based Bain News Service in 1898. Specializing in news about New York City, and to a lesser degree the eastern United States, Bain distributed its own pictures and those purchased from other commercial agencies to about 100 newspapers. While ...
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Library of Congress
Warsaw Province
This card is one of a souvenir set of 82 illustrated cards–one for each province of the Russian Empire as it existed in 1856. Each card presents an overview of a particular province’s culture, history, economy, and geography. The front of the card depicts such distinguishing features as rivers, mountains, major cities, and chief industries. The back of each card contains a map of the province, the provincial seal, information about the population, and a picture of the local costume of the inhabitants. Varshavskaia guberniia (Warsaw Province) depicted ...
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National Library of Russia
Kingdom of Poland
This card is one of a souvenir set of 82 illustrated cards–one for each province of the Russian Empire as it existed in 1856. Each card presents an overview of a particular province’s culture, history, economy, and geography. The front of the card depicts such distinguishing features as rivers, mountains, major cities, and chief industries. The back of each card contains a map of the province, the provincial seal, information about the population, and a picture of the local costume of the inhabitants. The Kingdom of Poland depicted ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Palace of the Elector of Brandenburg
This birds-eye view map offers a detailed picture of the Berlin palace of the elector of Brandenburg as it appeared in 1688. The residence was part of a large fortress that Frederick William I (1620–88) ordered built following the end of the Thirty Years’ War (1618–48) in Germany. Construction began in 1650 under the direction of the architect and engineer, Johann Gregor Memhardt (1607–78), and continued for more than a quarter of a century. The complex, also known as the Berlin Fortress, had five city gates and ...
Contributed by
Berlin State Library - Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation
Locomotive: Newspaper for the Political Education of the People, No. 1, April 1, 1848
The radical 1848 newspaper Locomotive is the most important journalistic work of Friedrich Wilhelm Alexander Held (1813–72). After pursuing a military career as an officer in the Prussian army, Held returned to civilian life and worked for a time as an actor and writer. In 1843, he moved to Leipzig where he published the newspaper, Die Lokomotive (The locomotive). The paper quickly achieved success, its circulation reaching some 12,000 copies per day. His paper was soon banned, even though Held was less a political radical than an advocate ...
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Berlin State Library - Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation
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The Triumphs of Maximilian
Among the many endeavors undertaken by Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I (1459–1519) to further his legacy was his plan of a monumental allegorical triumph, to be composed of more than 200 woodcuts. Many of the foremost artisans of the time worked on the project, but it was stopped after the Emperor's death and thus was never finished. The Munich manuscript of the Turnierbuch (Tournament book, also known as The Triumphs of Maximilian) features copies of the preparatory drawings made by Hans Burgkmair the Elder (1473–1531), who was ...
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Bavarian State Library
Early Bavarian Law
The Lex Baiuvariorum (Bavarian law) is the oldest surviving Latin document of any extent composed in Bavaria and the most important source for the early history of Bavaria. Containing the text of the first Bavarian statute book, it reflects, besides the history of the law, the economic, social, and cultural history of Bavaria under Agilolfingian rule in the sixth–eighth centuries. It focuses on criminal law, prescribing fiscal penalties for various infringements, and also deals with constitutional, civil, and procedural law. The preface reveals the high sources from which the ...
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Bavarian State Library
Austria, Hungary, Foreign Policy of Austria-Hungary
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Austria, Hungary, Foreign Policy of Austria-Hungary is Number 1 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. The book is in three parts. The first is an overview of the political history ...
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Library of Congress
Austrian Silesia
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Austrian Silesia is Number 4 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. The duchy of Austrian Silesia consisted of the two Silesian districts of Troppau and Teschen that remained under Austrian ...
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Library of Congress
Bavarian Palatinate
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Bavarian Palatinate is Number 37 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. The study includes sections on physical and political geography, political history, social and political conditions, and economic conditions, of ...
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Library of Congress