14 results in English
Map of Northern Arabia: in Illustration of Lady Anne Blunt’s Journeys
This map shows the routes of two Arabian journeys taken in the late 1870s by Lady Anne Blunt (1837–1917) and her husband, the poet Wilfrid Scawen Blunt (1840–1922). Lady Anne was a skilled equestrienne and horse breeder, who purchased Arabian horses from Bedouin tribesmen, which she then had transported back to England. Her work did much to establish the Arabian breed in Britain. In 1878, Lady Anne journeyed from Beirut, across northern Syria, and south through Mesopotamia to Baghdad. From there she traveled north along the Tigris River ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Java and Madura
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Java and Madura is Number 82 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Java was the most populous island in what was then the Dutch East Indies (present-day Indonesia). Madura is ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
University, Belgrade, Servia
This photochrome print of Kapetan Misino zdanje (Captain Misa's building) in Belgrade, Serbia, is part of “Views of Belgrade, Serbia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Built between 1858 and 1863, the structure was designed by Czech architect Jan Nevole (1812-1903). It was intended to be the residence of the wealthy merchant and proponent of education, Captain Misa Anastasijevic, who donated it to the city on the condition that it be used for educational and cultural pursuits. The building, with its many domes and portals, recalls the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Makian As It Appears from the Side of Ngofakiaha
This view of the island of Makian and the village of Ngofakiaha in the Maluku Islands (present-day Indonesia) is from the Atlas Blaeu-Van der Hem. Representing the entire surface of the Earth, the 50 volume work is often considered the most beautiful and most remarkable atlas ever composed. The collectors atlas (a special form of compiling cartographic material) was based on the Atlas Maior (Great atlas), published in Amsterdam by Joan Blaeu (1596–1673) in various editions between 1662 and 1672. This was the largest and most expensive book produced ...
Contributed by Austrian National Library
Moslems Worshipping the Shrines Sacred to Islam, Mecca, Arabia
This photograph of a scene in Mecca, present-day Saudi Arabia, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Chart of Part of the Sea Coast of New South Wales on the East Coast of New Holland from Point Hicks to Black Head
This map is one of four manuscript charts from the first great voyage of exploration by Captain James Cook, which in April 1770 made the first clear delineation of the east coast of Australia. Sponsored by the Royal Society and the Royal Navy, the expedition had several objectives. Cook was to observe and describe the transit of Venus, chart the coastlines of places he visited in the South Pacific, and record details of the peoples, flora, and fauna he saw. The expedition sponsors also hoped Cook would find and claim ...
A Chart of Part of the Sea Coast of New South Wales on the East Coast of New Holland from Black Head to Cape Morton
This map is one of four manuscript charts from the first great voyage of exploration by Captain James Cook, which in April 1770 made the first clear delineation of the east coast of Australia. Sponsored by the Royal Society and the Royal Navy, the expedition had several objectives. Cook was to observe and describe the transit of Venus, chart the coastlines of places he visited in the South Pacific, and record details of the peoples, flora, and fauna he saw. The expedition sponsors also hoped Cook would find and claim ...
A Chart of Part of the Sea Coast of New South Wales on the East Coast of New Holland from Cape Morton to Cape Palmerston
This map is one of four manuscript charts from the first great voyage of exploration by Captain James Cook, which in April 1770 made the first clear delineation of the east coast of Australia. Sponsored by the Royal Society and the Royal Navy, the expedition had several objectives. Cook was to observe and describe the transit of Venus, chart the coastlines of places he visited in the South Pacific, and record details of the peoples, flora, and fauna he saw. The expedition sponsors also hoped Cook would find and claim ...
A Chart of Part of the Sea Coast of New South Wales on the East Coast of New Holland from Cape Palmerston to Cape Flattery
This map is one of four manuscript charts from the first great voyage of exploration by Captain James Cook, which in April 1770 made the first clear delineation of the east coast of Australia. Sponsored by the Royal Society and the Royal Navy, the expedition had several objectives. Cook was to observe and describe the transit of Venus, chart the coastlines of places he visited in the South Pacific, and record details of the peoples, flora, and fauna he saw. The expedition sponsors also hoped Cook would find and claim ...
The U.S. Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin: a Personal Narrative
Elisha Kent Kane (1820–57) was an American Arctic explorer. He studied medicine in his native Philadelphia and in 1843 entered the U.S. Navy as a surgeon. In 1850 he sailed as the senior medical officer and naturalist on an expedition in search of Sir John Franklin (1786–1847), the British naval officer and explorer who had been missing in the Canadian Arctic since 1845. Funded by New York merchant Henry Grinnell and carried out by the U.S. Navy, the expedition explored Lancaster Sound and Wellington Channel and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
South: The Story of Shackleton's Last Expedition, 1914–17
After the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached the South Pole in December 1911, the British explorer Ernest Henry Shackleton, who had come within 180.6 kilometers of the pole in 1909, decided that the last great Antarctic journey to be achieved was a crossing of the continent. After fitting out the ship Endurance, Shackleton headed south from England in September 1914. The Endurance left the whaling station at Grytviken, South Georgia Island on December 5. In January 1915 the ship encountered heavy pack ice in the Weddell Sea, and eventually ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Heart of the Antarctic; Being the Story of the British Antarctic Expedition 1907–1909
The British Antarctic Expedition of 1907–9, led by Ernest H. Shackleton, left Port Lyttelton, New Zealand, in the ship Nimrod on January 1, 1908. On February 3, the Nimrod deposited Shackleton and a party of 14 men at Cape Royds, on Ross Island. The men divided into three groups. One would try to reach the South Pole, a second went north to reach the South Magnetic Pole, while a third was to explore the mountains west of McMurdo Sound. Shackleton, three companions, and four ponies set out for the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Roald Amundsen's "The North West Passage"; Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration of the Ship "Gjöa", 1903-1907
Attempts to find the Northwest Passage—a water route from Europe to Asia through the Arctic archipelago north of the Canadian mainland—began as far back as the late-15th century. After numerous failures, many involving disaster and great loss of life, the Northwest Passage finally was successfully navigated in 1903–6 by the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen (1872–1928). Amundsen and a small crew of six left Christiania (present-day Oslo, Norway) in the converted 47-ton fishing boat Gjöa on June 16, 1903. They proceeded to the west coast of Greenland ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General Map Showing the Explorations and Surveys of the Expedition, 1907-09
The British Antarctica Expedition of 1907-09, led by Ernest H. Shackleton, left Port Lyttelton, New Zealand, in the ship Nimrod on January 1, 1908. On February 3, the Nimrod deposited Shackelton and a party of 14 men at Cape Royds. The men divided into three groups. One would try to reach the South Pole, a second went north to reach the South Magnetic Pole, while a third was to explore the mountains west of McMurdo Sound. Shackleton, three companions, and four ponies set out for the South Pole on October ...
Contributed by Library of Congress