4 results in English
Commentaries by Domizio Calderini on Works by Juvenal, Statius, Ovid, and Propertius
Under the influence of Italian humanism and of his book-collector tutor János Vitéz, the Archbishop of Esztergom, Matthias Corvinus of Hungary (1443–1490), developed a passion for books and learning. Elected king of Hungary in 1458 at the age of 14, Matthias won great acclaim for his battles against the Ottoman Turks and his patronage of learning and science. He created the Bibliotheca Corviniana, in its day one of Europe’s finest libraries. After his death, and especially after the conquest of Buda by the Turks in 1541, the library ...
Commentaries and Questions on the Complete Logic of Aristotle and of the Subtle Doctor John Duns Scotus
Commentarii ac quaestiones in universam Aristotelis ac subtilissimi doctoris Ihoannis Duns Scoti logicam (Commentaries and questions on the complete logic of Aristotle and of the subtle doctor John Duns Scotus) was published in Lima, Peru in 1610. John Duns Scotus (died 1308) was a Franciscan priest and scholastic theologian and philosopher whose writings had great influence on both religious and secular thought in Europe. He was known by the Latin surname “Doctor Subtilis.” The first printing press in South America was established in Lima by Antonio Ricardo (circa 1540−1606 ...
Contributed by National Library of Peru
Saint Jerome’s “Instruments of Hieronymus” and other Music Manuscripts
A particular set of colored drawings—the so-called “instruments of Hieronymus”—is often found in portrayals of medieval musical instruments. These drawings go back to this miscellany from the Benedictine abbey of Saint Emmeram in Ratisbon (present-day Regensburg), Bavaria, which comprises several writings on music from the ninth century to the 13th. Executed in Freising in the third quarter of the ninth century, the drawings illustrate a letter, said to have been written by the Church Father and translator of the Bible Saint Jerome (died 420) to the Gallic Christian ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Liudprand’s “Antapodosis,” “Chronicle of Otto’s Reign,” and Regino of Prüm’s “The Chronicle”
This is a historical miscellany written in Freising, Bavaria, under Bishop Abraham (died 994). It contains two works by Liutprand of Cremona (died approximately 972)‏, Liber de rebus gestis Ottonis (A chronicle of Otto's reign) and Antapodosis (Tit-for-tat); and Chronica quam Regino quondam abbas Pruniensis composuit (Chronicle of Regino of Prüm) by Regino,‏ ‎abbot of Prüm (840−915) and its continuation by Adalbert of Magdeburg (died 981). Liutprand's historical works narrate mainly the history of Italy in the ninth century and first half of the tenth century, but ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library