5 results
The Book of Calixto and Melibea and of the Old Whore Celestina
La Celestina is undoubtedly one of the greatest bestsellers in Spanish literature. It is said to have been printed in more than 200 early editions, although fewer than half of these have survived. The work, by Fernando de Rojas (died 1541), began as a comedy in 16 acts, which was extended to 21 acts in the tragicomedy, which became the popular version. In addition to being published throughout Spain, the Spanish text was printed in Lisbon, Rome, Venice, Milan and Antwerp. Early translations into Italian, French, German, English, and Dutch ...
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National Library of Spain
Amadis of Gaul
Amadís de Gaula (Amadis of Gaul) is a famous prose romance of chivalry, first composed in Spain or Portugal and most likely based on French sources. An early version of the work probably existed by the late 13th century or early 14th century. A version in three books, of which brief fragments are extant, can be dated around 1420. Garci Rodriguez de Montalvo, ruler of Medina del Campo, reworked that version, added a fourth book, and continued with a fifth, entitled Las sergas de Esplandián (The adventures of Esplandian). The ...
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National Library of Spain
Writings of Lope de Vega: Daza Codex
Félix Arturo Lope de Vega (1562–1635) was a playwright and poet during Spain’s literary Golden Age and known for his prodigious output. He wrote some 3,000 sonnets, three novels, four novellas, nine epic poems, and about 1,800 plays. This manuscript, known as the Daza Codex, is a signed draft, written by Lope between 1631 and 1634, near the end of his life. It is not a book in itself but a cartapacio misceláneo (miscellaneous notebook) that belonged to the Duke of Sessa, Lope’s patron and ...
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National Library of Spain
A Celebration of and Posthumous Works by the Phoenix of Mexico and Tenth Muse, the Mexican Poet, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz
Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651–95) is considered among the greatest writers of Mexico, a central figure of 17th-century Latin American literature, and an early feminist who championed the right of women to acquire knowledge. She was born on the hacienda of Nepantla to parents who were not married and placed in the custody of her maternal grandfather. In 1667, she joined the Order of Discalced Carmelites in Mexico City, where she was free to pursue her intellectual and literary interests. She owned a library of some 4,000 ...
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Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon
Amadis of Gaul
Amadís de Gaula (Amadis of Gaul) belongs to the genre of chivalric romances written in Spain in the late 15th century and the first half of the 16th century, often based on French sources. They are characterized as imaginative works of illusion, filled with wonders and enchantments. The Amadís of the National Library of Colombia is a beautiful volume of 600 pages (more than 1,500 pages in today's editions), printed in two columns in gothic type. It is illustrated with numerous woodcuts covering a wide variety of ...
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National Library of Colombia